The Time Machine : An Invention / Edition 1

The Time Machine : An Invention / Edition 1

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by H. G. Wells, Nicholas Ruddick, Nicholas Ruddick, Nicholas Ruddick
     
 

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ISBN-10: 1551113058

ISBN-13: 9781551113050

Pub. Date: 02/12/2001

Publisher: Broadview Press

Wells was interested in the implications of evolutionary theory on the future of human beings at the biological, sociological, and cultural levels, and The Time Machine, short and readable, draws on many of the social and scientific debates of the time. The Broadview edition of this science fiction classic includes extensive materials on Wells’s

Overview

Wells was interested in the implications of evolutionary theory on the future of human beings at the biological, sociological, and cultural levels, and The Time Machine, short and readable, draws on many of the social and scientific debates of the time. The Broadview edition of this science fiction classic includes extensive materials on Wells’s scientific and political influences.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781551113050
Publisher:
Broadview Press
Publication date:
02/12/2001
Series:
Broadview Literary Texts Series
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
300
Sales rank:
584,050
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.56(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
H. G. Wells: A Brief Chronology
A Note on the Text

The Time Machine: An Invention

Appendix A. The Evolutionary Context: Biology

  1. Charles Darwin, from The Origin of Species (1859, 1872)
  2. E. Ray Lankester, from Degeneration (1880)
  3. Thomas H. Huxley, from “The Struggle for Existence in Human Society” (1888)
  4. H. G. Wells, from “Zoological Retrogression” (1891)
  5. H. G. Wells, from Text-Book of Biology (1893)
  6. Thomas H. Huxley, from “Evolution and Ethics” (1893)
  7. H. G. Wells, “On Extinction” (1893)
  8. H. G. Wells, from “The Man of the Year Million” (1893)
  9. H. G. Wells, from “The Extinction of Man” (1894)

Appendix B. The Evolutionary Context: Society

  1. Thomas Carlyle, from Past and Present (1843)
  2. Karl Marx, from various writings (1844-64)
  3. Frederick Engels, from The Condition of the Working-Class (1845)
  4. Benjamin Disraeli, from Sybil (1845)
  5. Herbert Spencer, from Social Statics (1851)
  6. Herbert Spencer, from First Principles (1862)
  7. Jules Verne, from The Child of the Cavern (1877)
  8. Henry George, from Progress and Poverty (1880)
  9. Edward Bellamy, from Looking Backward (1888)
  10. Thomas H. Huxley, from “The Struggle for Existence in Human Society” (1888)
  11. William Morris, from News from Nowhere (1890)
  12. Benjamin Kidd, from Social Evolution (1894)

Appendix C. The Evolutionary Context: Culture

  1. Winwood Reade, from The Martyrdom of Man (1872, 1875)
  2. Friedrich Nietzsche, from The Joyful Wisdom (1882, 1886)
  3. H. G. Wells, from “The Rediscovery of the Unique” (1891)
  4. Max Nordau, from Degeneration (1892, 1895)

Appendix D. The Spatiotemporal Context: The Fourth Dimension

  1. Edwin A. Abbott, from Flatland (1884)
  2. C. H. Hinton, from “What Is the Fourth Dimension?” (1884)
  3. “S,” “Four-Dimensional Space” (1885)
  4. E. A. Hamilton Gordon, from “The Fourth Dimension” (1887)
  5. Oscar Wilde, from “The Canterville Ghost” (1887)
  6. William James, from The Principles of Psychology (1890)
  7. Simon Newcomb, from “Modern Mathematical Thought” (1894)

Appendix E. The Spatiotemporal Context: Solar Death and the End of the World

  1. Jonathan Swift, from Gulliver’s Travels (1726)
  2. William Thomson, from “On the Age of the Sun’s Heat” (1862)
  3. Balfour Stewart, from The Conservation of Energy (1874)
  4. Balfour Stewart & Peter Guthrie Tait, from The Unseen Universe (1875)
  5. George Howard Darwin, from “The Determination of the Secular Effects of Tidal Friction by a Graphical Method” (1879)
  6. George Howard Darwin, from “On the Precession of a Viscous Spheroid” (1879)
  7. H. G. Wells, from “The ‘Cyclic’ Delusion” (1894)
  8. Camille Flammarion, from Omega (1894)

Appendix F. Extracts from Wells’s Correspondence

Appendix G. Wells on The Time Machine

  1. H. G. Wells, from “Popularising Science” (1894)
  2. H. G. Wells, from “Preface,” Works of H. G. Wells, Vol. 1 (1924)
  3. H. G. Wells, from “Preface,” The Time Machine: An Invention (1931)
  4. H. G. Wells, from “Preface,” Seven Famous Novels (1934)
  5. H. G. Wells, from Experiment in Autobiography (1934)
  6. H. G. Wells, from “Fiction About the Future” (1938)

Appendix H. Reviews of The Time Machine

  1. From Review of Reviews [London] (March 1895)
  2. From Review of Reviews [New York] (June 1895)
  3. New York Times (23 June 1895)
  4. Spectator (13 July 1895)
  5. Literary World (13 July 1895)
  6. Nature (18 July 1895)
  7. From Saturday Review (20 July 1895)
  8. Daily Chronicle (27 July 1895)
  9. Israel Zangwill, from Pall Mall Magazine (September 1895)
  10. From Review of Reviews [New York] (October 1895)

Appendix I. Contemporary Portraits of Wells

  1. From Bookman (August 1895)
  2. “Picaroon,” from Chap-Book [Chicago] (1896)

Selected Annotated Bibliography

Works Cited

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The Time Machine (Norton Critical Editions) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 125 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is one of the most interesting books that highschools should read. I would recommend this book to anyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you have a brain, this book is for you. This book is a amazing piece of literature, and I had no idea before reading it that its actually so short. Its not even 200 pages! But its still one amazing book. H.G. Wells was one amazing writer, to be able to compile so much thought into so few words. Again, if you have a brain, you will realize as you read it that it contains a critiscism on society and a moral lesson as well as providing a entertaining story. If you fell asleep while reading this, then that part of your brain that handles thought was obviously on strike.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The reason I chose this book to read, is because I had just finished reading "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card and I was still craving some science fiction. My teacher handed us a list of Honors books that we should be reading and I saw "The Time Machine". I decided to read it and I loved it! I read it everywhere I went! Some of my teachers even had to take it away so I could focus in class! Some reasons I recommend this book to you is because of its amazing ability to keep you reading, it is so interesting, I loved the detail that made me shiver, it painted a picture in my head that was amazing, and it makes your mind think differently, and lastly, the story line is just great. If you liked the "Ender" series, then you will love this book! It will keep you reading, and you will love it!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
When you hear someone is called the Father of Science Fiction, you expect his works to be more fatherly and less science fictiony. However, Well's "The Time Machine" is an innovative and intelligent visualization of what the distant future may still hold true for the human race.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was one of the best books ive ever red. I realy enjoyed how H.G Wells kept you intersted in the whole book by telling tou something and telling you he will explain later. You will never expect how well he explains the simple things and makes them outstanding. He does a lot of show not tells. The characters he makes up is just phonominal, and how he desribes how they look. I hope you enjoy this book as much as i did.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I loved how he captured all the details making it very fun and intresting. It really brought out his creativity. Nice Job!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Usually I am not interested in bokks but i had to do an adventure book for a book report of mine and i picked this book. At first it seemed like a regular sci fi book but it turned out to be a suspensful story. I think that readers, young and old, should read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I started reading The Time Machine, I couldn't put it down, not even for meals. I finishing it in a day and a half. It's a fascinating look at how we might evolve in the far future. A very enjoyable read. After reading The Time Machine, I had a feeling H.G. Wells wouldn't disappoint me with The Invisble Man. This chilling tale follows a young scientist gone mad when he discovers a way to become invisible. Unfortunutely, there is no turining back. This story was just as well written as The Time Machine. It took me only two days to read. I highly recommend getting this set of two instead of one or the other. Once you are captured, you will be eager to read more of his work.
Guest More than 1 year ago
H.G. Wells' Time Machine is the definition of a true Science Fiction novel. He uses many literary tools to convey the story of a young scientist who travels to the year 802,701 A.D. He finds that the human race (the eloi) has been made slaves of the mutant morlocks. His journey descibes a future world that has suffered from years of war. In the future, the scientist loses his time machine and has no way of returning to 1900(the year is not specifically mentioned). Will he ever return? He has all the time in world.
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The best
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Awesome but oldish
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