Time to Get Up, Time to Go

Time to Get Up, Time to Go

by David Milgrim
     
 

From the moment it’s “Time to get up!” until it’s time to be tucked back in bed, a toddler’s day is filled with activity. And so is his doll’s. There’s time to swim in the wading pool, slide down the slide, and stop to look at a snail. Later, there’s time to sweep, time to take a bath, and time for a bedtime story.

Overview

From the moment it’s “Time to get up!” until it’s time to be tucked back in bed, a toddler’s day is filled with activity. And so is his doll’s. There’s time to swim in the wading pool, slide down the slide, and stop to look at a snail. Later, there’s time to sweep, time to take a bath, and time for a bedtime story. Meanwhile, this little boy’s parents keep as loving an eye on their son as he does on his doll.

David Milgrim’s simple rhymed text and his unique, childlike illustration style are perfect for beginning readers, who will find much to relate to in this story of how a little boy and his doll spend a busy day.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"The matter-of-factness with which Milgrim treats his character's actions...stand[s] out. Cheery and cleanly composed." -HORN BOOK Horn Book
Publishers Weekly
Like Milgrim's Thank You, Thanksgiving, a concise rhyming text here depicts an unnamed child in a series of slice-of-life events. Readers follow a boy and his trusty doll from waking (before the rest of the house, of course) to bedtime. Milgrim divvies up the day into discrete "times," thereby attributing adult-level importance to each activity. The line "Time for swim class./ Time to slide./ Time for stopping./ Time to ride" finds the boy engaged in four different backyard activities, one per page. In the first, he and some friends gather around a wading pool watching their dolls float (or in the case of one doll, sink). Most of the play enables the boy to fill non-gender specific parental roles. He feeds the doll, cooks and reads for it, takes care of its boo-boo, and even stops for a sidewalk gab with a female peer while his "baby" sleeps in a stroller and hers dozes in a toy buggy. No matter what engages his considerable energy, the boy comes across as eager and upbeat, often flashing a wide-mouthed smile that takes up much of his little round head. Milgrim has a keen eye for detail (e.g., the play "stove" is an upside-down box) and a savvy sense of composition-there's never any question of where readers should look first. Preschoolers should enjoy perusing these pages, and comparing how their own busy days stack up against the hero's. Ages 3-6. (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
This simple picture book portrays a toddler's view of his world from the time he gets up to the time he goes to bed. Viewing himself as the parent of his doll, he guides the doll through the various activities of his day, such as eating breakfast, playing in the park, pretending at home, and storytelling at bedtime. The focus is on the cartoonlike drawings, while the brief rhyming text adds nicely to the story and will soon have young listeners "reading" along. The activities the boy engages in are ones all youngsters can identify with.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-From early morning to bedtime, a boy whirls through his day's activities, taking care of his stuffed blue doll. He feeds it breakfast, takes it for a walk, and takes it to the playground. The boy then does the grocery shopping, prepares lunch, and shares a storybook. The round of activities continues until bedtime when it is "Time for stories. Time to dream." Milgrim's digital oil-paint illustrations have muted, pleasant shades with the figures crisply outlined in black. They work well with the minimal text, in which not a word is wasted. There is time for everything in this joyful, imaginative picture book.-Linda Staskus, Parma Regional Library, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Parents of young sons will especially appreciate this simple example of a boy as caretaker, whose joy in showing his "baby" the wonders of the world is evident. Milgrim touches on the favorite daily activities of young children-playing outside, pretending to do grown-up things like shop and cook, reading, playing with friends, pretending to be a doctor, splashing in the bath and telling stories-with the little boy sweetly caring for the doll the entire time. The text itself is spare, simply stating what it's "time for" next, but the gentle rhymes will satisfy the youngest listeners and help set the stage for bedtime. "Time to scrub up and get clean. / Time for stories. / Time to dream." The illustrations are a delight, the little boy echoing the facial expressions, body language and actions learned from his own caretaker, from cheering his baby's swimming progress and making him a seatbelt for the toy car, to stooping down low to point out a snail on the sidewalk. A must-have for every parent of a toddler boy, but will be enjoyed by little girls, too. (Picture book. 2-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618519989
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
04/17/2006
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
(w) x (h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
4 - 3 Years

Meet the Author

David Milgrim has created over a dozen books for children. His most recent book for Clarion is TIME TO GET UP, TIME TO GO. He lives with his family in Wakefield, Rhode Island.

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