Timekeeping: Explore the History and Science of Telling Time with 15 Projects

Overview


Timekeeping: Explore the History and Science of Telling Time travels through the past and into the future to explore how humans have measured the passage of time. From ancient civilization’s earliest calendars and shadow clocks to GPS and the atomic clocks of today, kids will track the evolution of timekeeping devices, meet the inventors of calendars and clocks, and learn interesting facts and trivia. Hands-on projects and activities include making a shadow clock, using a protractor to create a sundial, ...
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Timekeeping: Explore the History and Science of Telling Time with 15 Projects

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Overview


Timekeeping: Explore the History and Science of Telling Time travels through the past and into the future to explore how humans have measured the passage of time. From ancient civilization’s earliest calendars and shadow clocks to GPS and the atomic clocks of today, kids will track the evolution of timekeeping devices, meet the inventors of calendars and clocks, and learn interesting facts and trivia. Hands-on projects and activities include making a shadow clock, using a protractor to create a sundial, measuring time using water, and creating your own calendar.

Kids will understand how civilization’s vague abilities to track days and months has transformed over the centuries into a sophisticated ability to keep time to the millionth of a second. Timekeeping meets common core state standards in language arts for reading informational text and literary nonfiction and is aligned with Next Generation Science Standards. Guided Reading Levels and Lexile measurements indicate grade level and text complexity.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

VOYA
". . .With a friendly, relaxed writing style, Formichelli and Martin cover the history of timekeeping beginning with the first humans, who measured time simply by watching the seasons, and ending with the invention of astoundingly precise atomic and optical clocks. The book covers the development of the first calendars, interesting clocks throughout the ages, the world’s time zones, and daylight savings time. Intriguing science experiments demonstrate various concepts of time and give the reader instructions to build several timekeeping mechanisms. The authors also include a timeline of major developments in the science of timekeeping and provide lists of websites and famous monuments involving time.

To be able to address a topic as complex as that of time in such a concise and interesting manner is truly impressive. . . this book is generally readable, enjoyable, and extremely informative."

Booklist
". . .Fifteen versatile and hands-on projects range from very simple exercises that can be completed in moments, such as reading seasons from a shadow, to more sophisticated temporal experiments like making your own incense clock. These projects could be used as a fun diversion on a rainy afternoon at home or as the crux of an elementary science lesson."

Dave White, Publisher, Social Studies for Kids
Timekeeping: Explore the History and Science of Telling Time is well worth a read—or two or three. The fun illustrations complement the informative text, taking readers on a tour de force of time and timekeeping through the ages. With its combination of solid concepts and fun activities, this book will be a popular addition to the bookshelves of many a student, parent, or teacher.”

Marla Conn,Educational Consultant
Timekeeping does a fantastic job of teaching the history of time from prehistoric days using simple sundials to present day GPS technology. The content meets the Common Core State Standards in math, science, social studies, and technology, while the activities provide interactive hands-on learning experiences that make learning fun and meaningful!”

Children's Literature - Kristi Bernard
Do you ever find yourself running out of time? Who was it that set the standard for time anyway? The Egyptians were the first to use calendars around 4000 BCE. They monitored three seasons (flood, seed, and harvest) and they lasted four lunar months. The moons cycle was either 28 or 29 days. There were many other cultures that created and utilized calendars, such as the Muslims and Hebrews. But, ultimately it was the Egyptians who explained the origin of the five epagomenal days. Once the calendar was established, it was the Babylonians who came up with minutes, by using the movement of stars to divide day and night into twelve equal parts. The Babylonians had already made great advances in arithmetic, so it was logical for them to divide each hour into sixty pieces (minutes) and then each of those pieces into smaller parts (seconds). It is no surprise that we now keep time, save time, lose time, buy time, and make time when we are running late. This timekeeping guide takes readers back to the beginning. Fun facts and timekeeping historical timelines can be found here. Readers will also find lots of activities for making their own candle clock, incense clock, hand sundial, and even finding time in the stars. There is a lot of fun information here. Teachers and parents will love making this guide a part of their library. Reviewer: Kristi Bernard
School Library Journal
Gr 5–8—This title digs into the concept of timekeeping and shows not only the complexity, but also the malleable system that is just another creation of humankind. Readers will understand the reasons behind the International Date Line, prime meridian, daylight savings time, and other timekeeping systems. Written in a conversational tone with cartoon illustrations and clock-shaped "Did You Know?" fact boxes, it is an approachable and fascinating read that includes 15 projects ranging from simple to complex that, for the most part, can be completed with household materials. Kids can use a penny and a quarter to illustrate the difference between a solar and sidereal day, they can build a sandglass with a couple of plastic bottles, or discover how GPS works with three friends, a field, and a quarter. There are activities that will yield a number of amazing facts, such as the 300 different time zones that existed in the U.S. in the 1800s, and mind-blowing concepts, such as J. William Cupp's metric time system. Make time for this title.—Heather Acerro, Rochester Public Library, MN
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781619301368
  • Publisher: Nomad Press
  • Publication date: 10/25/2012
  • Series: Build It Yourself Series
  • Pages: 128
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author


Linda Formichelli is a freelance writer whose articles have appeared in several youth and science publications including Ack!, Delta Education, Odyssey, Yes, and Zillions. She is the author of Becoming a Personal Trainer for Dummies, Renegade Writer, and a coauthor of Tools of Timekeeping. W. Eric Martin has written articles for more than 50 publications and has provided dictionary entries for Thomson Gale's World of Computer Science. He is a coauthor of Tools of Timekeeping. They both live in Blackstone, Massachusetts.

Sam Carbaugh is the illustrator of Amazing Math Projects You Can Build Yourself, Discover the Desert, Food: 25 Amazing Projects, George Washington: 25 Great Projects You Can Build Yourself, and Robotics." He lives in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

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