Timothy: Paul's Closest Associate

Overview

While most Christians might accurately identify Timothy as an associate of the apostle Paul, they probably conjure up images of Timothy and his relationship with Paul in twenty-first-century terms. In Timothy: Paul's Closest Associate, Bruce J. Malina ventures off the path of modern biography, with its interest in psychological development and introspection, toward a more likely description of Timothy. Malina draws us out of our individualistic worldview and into the first-century Mediterranean world, where ...

See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (9) from $4.78   
  • New (4) from $12.80   
  • Used (5) from $4.78   
Sending request ...

Overview

While most Christians might accurately identify Timothy as an associate of the apostle Paul, they probably conjure up images of Timothy and his relationship with Paul in twenty-first-century terms. In Timothy: Paul's Closest Associate, Bruce J. Malina ventures off the path of modern biography, with its interest in psychological development and introspection, toward a more likely description of Timothy. Malina draws us out of our individualistic worldview and into the first-century Mediterranean world, where introspection was unheard of and collectivism prevailed. Here alone, within a network of friends and associates, can we discover the real Timothy. Moreover, Malina's fascinating explanation of social-scientific group development over generations, while perhaps challenging readers to rethink traditional biblical interpretation, provides readers with fresh and plausible insights about Timothy. These insights lead to a greater appreciation not only for Timothy but, more important, for the gospel of God that Paul enjoined on him to proclaim: the God of Israel raised Jesus from the dead, making him Lord and Messiah.

Bruce J. Malina, STD, is professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Creighton University in Omaha. He is the author of numerous works, including The New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology (Atlanta: John Knox, 1981; rev. ed., 1993; Louisville: Westminster/Knox, 3rd rev. ed., 2001); with John J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary on the Letters of Paul (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2006); and with John J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2008).

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

. . . an excellent primer for Christian ethics.
Catholic Studies An Online Journal

This volume is an excellent tool for learning about the commonalities and distinctions between traditionally Roman Catholic and Protestant approaches to Christian ethics.
Catholic Library World

Highly recommended especially for religious studies students focusing on Christian Ethics.
The Midwest Book Review

Views on ethics cannot be considered light reading, but the editors of this work have employed design and language that bring the issues into clear focus.
Carol Blank, Writing Works, Columbia, Maryland

An excellent anthology for ethics students that draws together diverse, illuminating, and engaging readings from many strands of the Christian tradition. Ahearn and Gathje provide valuable background commentary to situate the various arguments and substantive excerpts.
Christine D. Pohl, Professor of Christian Social Ethics, Asbury Theological Seminary

By skillful use of excerpts from many excellent sources, the authors help us to penetrate and appreciate a wide range of both Catholic and Protestant approaches to ethical reasoning. In a most insightful and engaging way, this volume leads students of Christian ethics through the contours of this complex field. I expect instructors of ethics courses at all levels to make good use of this valuable resource for years to come.
Thomas Massaro, S.J

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Meet the Author


Bruce J. Malina, STD, is professor of New Testament and Early Christianity at Creighton University in Omaha. He is the author of numerous works, including The New Testament World: Insights from Cultural Anthropology (Atlanta: John Knox, 1981; rev. ed., 1993; Louisville: Westminster/Knox, 3rd rev. ed., 2001); with John J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary on the Letters of Paul (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2006); and with John J. Pilch, Social Science Commentary on the Acts of the Apostles (Minneapolis: Fortress, 2008).
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface     vii
Introduction: Who Is Timothy?     ix
Timothy: The Collectivistic Person     1
The Jesus Tradition: Where Does Timothy Fit In?     21
Timothy as Assistant to Paul: What Was Paul Up To?     48
Specifics about Timothy: Paul's Cowriter and Coworker     70
The Timothy Tradition Begins: Third-Generation Recollections     95
The Second Letter of Paul and Timothy to the Thessalonians: About Forgery     110
Final Traditions about Timothy in the New Testament     122
Conclusion     131
Notes     133
Bibliography     140
Scripture and Ancient Authors Index     144
Index of Persons and Subjects     150
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)