Timothy Tunny Swallowed a Bunny

Timothy Tunny Swallowed a Bunny

by Bill Grossman, Kevin Hawkes
     
 

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Bill Grossman and Kevin Hawkes, the duo that created the popular My Little Sister Ate One Hare have teamed up again in this outrageously funny collection of poems. From Kevin T. Moses, who has seventeen noses, to squeaky-clean Keith, who is so obsessed with brushing his teeth that he brushes his whole head away, these hilarious characters will delight parentsSee more details below

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Overview

Bill Grossman and Kevin Hawkes, the duo that created the popular My Little Sister Ate One Hare have teamed up again in this outrageously funny collection of poems. From Kevin T. Moses, who has seventeen noses, to squeaky-clean Keith, who is so obsessed with brushing his teeth that he brushes his whole head away, these hilarious characters will delight parents and rhyme-happy kids in any season!

About the Authors:
Bill Grossman worked as a computer engineer and third-grade teacher before he began writing books for children. His many critically acclaimed titles include My Little Sister Ate One Hare illustrated by Kevin Hawkes, Tommy at the Grocery Store, and Donna O'Neeshuck Was Chased by Some Cows. He lives in Connecticut.

Kevin Hawkes is the illustrator of many best-selling books for children, including My Little Sister Ate One Hare by Bill Grossman and Westlandia by Paul Fleischman. He lives in Maine.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Grossman and Hawkes, the team behind My Little Sister Ate One Hare, serve up a collection of short verses about characters with silly names who meet equally silly fates, including the titular Timothy; Hannibal, who encounters a cannibal; and Harold B. Bound, whose eyeballs--well, never mind. Grossman's creations have the infectious jump-rope rhythm and tongue-in-cheek humor of classic nursery rhymes ("You're walking, old Ned/ With a horse on your head/ Why? That can't be much fun./ `I'm walking,' says Ned,/ `With my horse on my head/ Because I'm too tired to run' "). Many of the poems trade on anomalies like multiple noses and ballooning waistlines for their laughs. "Walter Lackwards/ Head on backwards/ Tripped on things he passed" starts one; others star characters skinny enough to slide down drains, or flattened by passing trucks into Frisbee-sized discs. Hawkes's full-bleed acrylics playfully exploit these oddball characters. His illustrations, peopled with pop-eyed, slack-jawed innocents who never know what is going to hit them next, provide satisfying visual counterparts for Grossman's topsy-turvy world. Kevin T. Moses, the man with all the noses, stumbles in pinstripes through a field of tulips, reaching for his Kleenex; John Paul Mullers, the victim of a paint explosion, floats crazily inside a carved wooden frame on a museum wall, as two bespectacled visitors peer at him. The happy combination of wildly exaggerated illustrations and cracked humor make this a promising read-aloud choice. Ages 3-7. (Mar.) Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.
Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
In this collection of short verses about characters with silly names who meet equally silly fates, "the happy combination of wildly exaggerated illustrations and cracked humor make this a promising read-aloud choice," said PW. Ages 3-7. (Feb.)
Children's Literature
The team that brought readers My Little Sister Ate One Hare is back together with another gleeful collection of poetry and equally amusing art. The laughs start on the title page with Dad imprisoned in a green bottle from the poem "Poor Dad." When the kids couldn't free him from the witch's curse, they returned the bottle for the nickel deposit. The image on the acknowledgement page comes from a poem entitled "Skinny Young Jane," who unfortunately ends up going down the drain. There is plenty of word play, as in "John Paul Mullers/Got coated with colors/When some buckets of paint blew apart./ We put John Paul/In a frame on the wall./Now everyone knows him as "Art."" Most of the poems are presented on two-page spreads and the text and illustrations are all big and bold. It is irreverent and that is certainly part of the attraction. 2001, HarperCollins, . Ages 3 to 7. Reviewer: Marilyn Courtot
School Library Journal - School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-Grossman and Hawkes, who previously collaborated on My Little Sister Ate One Hare (Crown, 1996), present a gathering of characters as unfortunate as any you will meet outside of Edward Lear's limericks. From the father bewitched into a bottle his family returns for the deposit to "Skinny young Jane" who slides down the drain, these ridiculously funny rhymes will tickle young funny bones. John Paul Mullers was coated with colors and framed on the wall, so his friends call him "Art." Other rhymes present ridiculous situations such as the title character whose snack has "lodged in his throat" and whose mother tells him, "Be thankful it isn't a goat." Grossman's short and pithy rhymes are well matched by Hawkes's droll paintings, which catch just the right expression of the comic possibilities of each rhyme. Most of the selections are on a double spread and in keeping with the verbal directness, the print is large and thick and the pictures equally direct with no fussy detail. Though adults try to discourage children from laughing at the misfortunes of others, youngsters will sense that these situations are so over the top that they can enjoy their laughter.-Louise L. Sherman, formerly at Anna C. Scott School, Leonia, NJ Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kevin Hawkes vividly and colorfully illustrates Bill Grossman's witty and whimsical poetry. Very highly recommended for children ages 3 to 7, Timothy Tunny Swallowed A Bunny is a delightful addition to any family, school or public library collection. Kevin T. Moses: Kevin T. Moses/Has seventeen noses./Each birthday he grows a new nose./What will he do/When he's seventy-two/With all of the noses he grows?
Kirkus Reviews
Eighteen slaphappy poems play nimbly with words, names, and crazy situations. Grossman goes for the yucks with these loopy rhymes, but there's a hint of sophistication:"Timothy Tunny / Swallowed a bunny. / The bunny got lodged in his throat. / �That bunny looks funny,' / His mom said, �but Honey, / Be thankful it isn't a goat.' " And there are a number that have the mischief of a Shel Silverstein poem—"A witch mean and bad / Imprisoned poor Dad /In a bottle of pop in the closet. / We couldn't free Dad / And were sad when we had / To return him for the nickel deposit." For all the nonsense and whimsy, young readers will come away from the verse with a good sense of the suppleness of language and how it can be an agent of abiding humor."Harold B. Bound / Turned his eyeballs around / To see all the thoughts in his head. / What do you see / In your head. Harold B.? / �Nothing but cobwebs,' he said." Hawkes is the perfect zany artist to interpret these silly poems with images that would draw laughs even without the words. His deep-dish colors mind the music and the footwork of Grossman's highly visual wordplay. (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060516048
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
02/01/2003
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 11.00(h) x (d)
Age Range:
5 - 7 Years

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