The Timucua

The Timucua

by Emily J. Dolbear
     
 

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How did the Timucua catch Seafood?

They often used special fishing traps that caught fish that came in with the tide.

Inside, You'll Find:

How the arrival of Europeans in Florida changed the course of Timucua history;

Maps, a timeline, photos-and some Timucua sports and games;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!  See more details below

Overview

How did the Timucua catch Seafood?

They often used special fishing traps that caught fish that came in with the tide.

Inside, You'll Find:

How the arrival of Europeans in Florida changed the course of Timucua history;

Maps, a timeline, photos-and some Timucua sports and games;

Surprising TRUE facts that will shock and amaze you!

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Patrick Hunter
A fascinating look at a now extinct people, unusual in its presentation since it discusses the background of Spanish/French exploration within the Timucua land in Florida within the first chapters. Typically, this is following the explanation of culture and history of the studied people. Readers also learn how Florida got its name from the Spanish for flower; how explorers were searching for riches; and the battle for land between the Spanish and French which the Spanish lost. The only connection to the Timucua people in this section is a discussion of how they were forced to help build a mission in Saint Augustine and the translation of religious writings to the Timucua language by Francisco Pareja. It isn't until approximately half-way through the book that we learn about the Timucua people themselves. Here readers learn about Timucua village structure; the appearance of the Timucua people; their farming, hunting and fishing; beliefs and celebrations. The most interesting items in this section are the sidebars discribing Timucua games—kicking a mudball against a goalpost and throwing a ball at a target on a post—and about the strong black drink that Timucua used in ceremonies that would often make them sweat or vomit. The end of the Timucua came through disease and warfare with the Spanish when some Timucua decided to fight back against the Spanish soldiers. It is estimated that most Timucua after this went to Cuba or were absorbed by the Seminole tribe. For an extinct people all the information is given with richly illustrated portraits of the people along with engravings and a couple of representative photographs. These are captioned with text that ranges in color and font to make them pop-out more-so than the standard caption, adding some more visual interest. A glossary and additional resources are contained in the back. A decent book about one of the lesser known native peoples of North America. It may be worth the price, but if you can get your hands on a review copy first, that would be a better to help you determine if it is right for your library, school or curriculum. Part of the "A True Book" series. Reviewer: Patrick Hunter

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531293096
Publisher:
Scholastic Library Publishing
Publication date:
03/01/2011
Series:
A True Book
Pages:
48
Sales rank:
1,141,083
Product dimensions:
6.80(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.20(d)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

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