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Tin Lily
     

Tin Lily

5.0 1
by Jeff Black
 
Jeff Black has won a solid rep for writing impressionistic songs that are smart without forgetting the emotional undercurrent, and Tin Lily should deepen that feeling. The slow-rolling "Easy On Me" works like an updated, less sexist version of Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe."Black's narrator doesn't want commitment any more than Dylan's, he

Overview

Jeff Black has won a solid rep for writing impressionistic songs that are smart without forgetting the emotional undercurrent, and Tin Lily should deepen that feeling. The slow-rolling "Easy On Me" works like an updated, less sexist version of Dylan's "It Ain't Me Babe."Black's narrator doesn't want commitment any more than Dylan's, he just has a nicer way of putting it. "Hollow of Your Hand" is more prosaic, evoking the open road and the American landscape without getting too specific. Is he living in the shadow of a lover's hand? Or perhaps someone -- a singer or a writer -- who's come before him? In the end, the identity matters less than the impression of "farmlands of southern Illinois" opening up to reveal all of their natural glory. Black wraps his vocals around the lyrics of these and other songs, bringing a warm resonance that shows he's lived with them. The subtle arrangements of piano, guitar, and organ create a layered underpinning that adds another dimension to a song like "Nineteen" without overpowering it, while the rocking guitar brings a carefree abandon to "Libertine." These shifts in tone also give Tin Lily more variety than 2003's B-Sides and Confessions, Vol. 1, and ultimately make it a more satisfying recording. Black, it seems, has found his comfort zone.

Product Details

Release Date:
07/26/2005
Label:
Dualtone Music Group
UPC:
0803020120228
catalogNumber:
1202

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Tin Lily 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Playing Time – 47:09 -- Jeff Black is a singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist (guitar, keys, harmonica) whose Americana music incorporates influences of country, folk and rock stylings. His songs have been covered by Waylon Jennings, Sam Bush, Lisa Brokop, Jo-El Sonnier, Blackhawk and others. Although Arista Records put out his debut album, it is the Dualtone label that has now signed Black and released “Tin Lily.” With all lyrics included in the CD’s jacket, one should tune into his messages to see if they are memorable by providing inspiration, insight, or enlightenment. Or if his lyrics tell striking stories with some of his own interpretive twists and experiences along the way. Many of his songs give us his pensive considerations for homemade simplicity, the state of life and relationships. Others are quite uplifting as they encourage personal introspection and reflection. Black’s audiences are listening, and they are paying rapt attention to his more exhilarating material. Black associates with some veteran musicians. Kenny Vaughn and Will Kimbrough play electric guitars. Dave Roe and Dave Jacques play the bass, while drums/percussion are ably played by Craig Wright. Piano or organ are laid into the mix for two songs by Jody Nardone . Sam Bush (mandolin, fiddle) appears on a few tracks, and backup vocals are tastefully rendered by Mathew Ryan and Kate Campbell. The Black stock is a hearty working-class one made up of industrious people who weren’t afraid to get their hands dirty in the quest for success. Perseverance may be the key. Realizing that “the hard way out is hopeless,” Black also isn’t trying to prove anything to anyone. He’s merely letting his unique spiritually-tinged music speak for itself as he sings his songs that largely address country values. Born in Kansas City, Jeff Black has been compared to the likes of Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen, Harry Chapin and Steve Goodman. Sharing the same stage with Steve Earle, Shawn Colvin, John Hammond, Guy Clark and others will continue to build Black’s fanbase among patrons of music that sits outside the mainstream. Black is creating a powerful body of work as he explores his concern for ordinary life. With a keen ability to be both laconic and passionate, Jeff Black sings organic songs that are meant to be personally interpreted for meaning in one’s own life. Let’s hope he can find great success without becoming an articulate anachronism. (Joe Ross, Roseburg, OR.)