The Tin Woodman of Oz (Oz Series #12)

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Overview

Woot the Wanderer and the Scarecrow help the Tin Woodman find his old love, Nimmie Amee, suffering the ignominious enchantments of Mrs. Yoop's yookoohoo magic along the way.

Dorothy tries to rescue the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow from the giantess who has changed them into a tin owl and a teddy bear and is using them for playthings.

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The Tin Woodman of Oz (Illustrated)

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Overview

Woot the Wanderer and the Scarecrow help the Tin Woodman find his old love, Nimmie Amee, suffering the ignominious enchantments of Mrs. Yoop's yookoohoo magic along the way.

Dorothy tries to rescue the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow from the giantess who has changed them into a tin owl and a teddy bear and is using them for playthings.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486413020
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 12/28/2000
  • Series: Oz Series , #12
  • Edition description: UNABRIDGED
  • Pages: 288
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.44 (w) x 8.05 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900 and received enormous, immediate success. Baum went on to write seventeen additional novels in the Oz series. Today, he is considered the father of the American fairy tale. His stories inspired the 1939 classic film The Wizard of Oz, one of the most widely viewed movies of all time.

Michael Sieben is a professional designer and illustrator, primarily within the sub-culture of skateboarding, whose work has been exhibited and reviewed worldwide as well as featured in numerous illustration anthologies. He is a staff writer and illustrator for Thrasher magazine, and a weekly columnist for VICE.com. He is also a founding member of Okay Mountain Gallery and Collective in Austin, Texas, as well as the cofounder of Roger Skateboards. The author of There's Nothing Wrong with You (Hopefully), he lives and works in Austin.

John R. Neill was born in Philadelphia in 1877. In 1904, at the age of twenty-six, Neill received his first major book assignment, as illustrator for The Marvelous Land of Oz. From then until his death in 1943, Neill would illustrate over forty Oz books, including three he wrote himself. Today, his fabulous illustrations are synonymous with Oz.

Biography

Dorothy, Toto, the Scarecrow, Aunt Em -- where would our national psyche be without The Wonderful Wizard of Oz? L. Frank Baum, who created a story with an indelible, sometimes haunting impression on so many people, led a life that had a fairy-tale quality of its own.

Baum was born in 1856 to a family that had made a fortune in the oil business. Because he had a heart condition, his parents arranged for him to be tutored privately at the family’s Syracuse estate, “Roselawn.” As an adult, though, Baum flourished and failed at a dizzying variety of ventures, from writing plays to a stint with his family’s medicinal oil business (where he produced a potion called “Baum’s Castorine”), to managing a general store, to editing the Aberdeen Pioneer in Aberdeen, South Dakota. In 1897, following his mother-in-law’s advice, Baum wrote down the stories that he told his children. The firm of Way & Williams published the stories under the title Mother Goose in Prose, with illustrations by Maxfield Parrish, and Baum’s career as a writer was launched.

With the publication of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900, Baum gained instant success. The book, lavishly produced and featuring voluptuous illustrations by William Wallace Denslow, was the bestselling children’s book of the year. It also set a new standard for children’s literature. As a commentator for the September 8, 1900 New York Times described it, “The crudeness that was characteristic of the oldtime publications...would now be enough to cause the modern child to yell with rage and vigor...” The reviewer praised the book’s sheer entertainment value (its “bright and joyous atmosphere”) and likened it to The Story of the Three Bears for its enduring value. As the film industry emerged in the following years, few books were as manifestly destined for adaptation, and although it took almost four decades for a movie studio to translate Baum’s vision to film, the 1939 film did for the movies what Baum’s book had done for children’s literature: that is, raised the imaginative and technical bar higher than it had been before.

The loss of parents, the inevitable voyage toward independence, the yearning for home -- in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, Baum touched upon a child’s primal experiences while providing a rousing story of adventure. As his health declined, Baum continued the series with 14 more Oz books (his publisher commissioned more by other authors after his death), but none had quite the effect on the reading public that the first one did. Baum died from complications of a stroke in 1919.

Good To Know

Baum founded the National Association of Window Trimmers and published a magazine for the window-trimming trade – he also raised exotic chickens.

Buam was married to Maud Gage, a daughter of the famous women’s rights advocate Matilda Joslyn Gage.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Floyd Akers, Laura Bancroft, George Brooks, Edith Van Dyne, Schuyler Staunton, John Estes Cooke, Suzanne Metcalf, Louis F. Baum, Lyman Frank Baum (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      May 15, 1856
    2. Place of Birth:
      Chittenango, New York
    1. Date of Death:
      May 6, 1919
    2. Place of Death:
      Hollywood, California

Read an Excerpt

Woot the Wanderer

The Tin Woodman sat on his glittering tin throne in the handsome tin hall of his splendid tin castle in the Winkie Country of the Land of Oz. Beside him, in a chair of woven straw, sat his best friend, the Scarecrow of Oz. At times they spoke to one another of curious things they had seen and strange adventures they had known since first they two had met and become comrades. But at times they were silent, for these things had been talked over many times between them, and they found themselves contented in merely being together, speaking now and then a brief sentence to prove they were wide awake and attentive. But then, these two quaint persons never slept. Why should they sleep, when they never tired?

And now, as the brilliant sun sank low over the Winkie Country of Oz, tinting the glistening tin towers and tin minarets of the tin castle with glorious sunset hues, there approached along a winding pathway Woot the Wanderer, who met at the castle entrance a Winkie servant.

The servants of the Tin Woodman all wore tin helmets and tin breastplates and uniforms covered with tiny tin discs sewed closely together on silver cloth, so that their bodies sparkled as beautifully as did the tin castle-and almost as beautifully as did the Tin Woodman himself.

Woot the Wanderer looked at the man servantall bright and glittering-and at the magnificent castle-all bright and glittering-and as he looked his eyes grew big with wonder. For Woot was not very big and not very old and, wanderer though he was, this proved the most gorgeous sight that had ever met his boyish gaze.

"Who lives here?" he asked.

" The Emperor of the Pinkies,who is the famous Tin Woodman of Oz," replied the servant, who had been trained to treat all strangers with courtesy.

"A Tin Woodman I How queer l" exclaimed the little wanderer.

"Well, perhaps our Emperor is queer," admitted the servant; " but he is a kind master and as honest and true as good tin can make him; so we, who gladly serve him, are apt to forget that he is not like other people."

" May I see him` " asked Woot the Wanderer, after a moment's thought.

"If it please you to wait a moment, I will go and ask him," said the servant, and then he went into the hall where the Tin Woodman sat with his friend the Scarecrow. Both were glad to learn that a stranger had arrived at the castle, for this would give them something new to talk about, so the servant was asked to admit the boy at once.

By the time Woot the Wanderer had passedthrough the grand corridors -- all lined with ornamental tin -- and under stately tin archways and through the many tin rooms all set with beautiful tin furniture, his eyes had grown bigger than ever and his whole little body thrilled with amazement. But, astonished though he was, he was able to make a polite bow before the throne and to say in a respectful voice: " I salute your Illustrious Majesty and offer you my humble services."

"Very good! " answered the Tin Woodman in his accustomed cheerful manner. " Tell me who you are, and whence you come."

"I am known as Woot the Wanderer," answered the boy, "and I have come, through many travels and by roundabout ways, from my former home in a far corner of the Gillikin Country of Oz."

"To wander from one's home," remarked the Scarecrow, " is to encounter dangers and hardships, especially if one is made of meat and bone. Had you no friends in that corner of the Gillikin Country? Vas it not homelike and comfortable?"

To hear a man stuffed with straw speak, and speak so well, quite startled Woot, and perhaps he stared a bit rudely at the Scarecrow. But after a moment he replied:

"I had home and friends, your Honorable Strawness, but they were so quiet and happy and comfortable that I found them dismally stupid. Nothing in that corner of Oz interested me, but I believed that in other parts of the country I would find strange people and see new sights, and so I set out upon my wandering journey. I have been a wanderer for nearly a full year, and now my wanderings have brought me to this splendid castle."

"I suppose," said the Tin Woodman, " that in this year you have seen so much that you have become very wise."

"No," replied Woot, thoughtfully, " I am not at all wise, I beg to assure your Majesty. The more I wander the less I find that I know, for in the Land of Oz much wisdom and many things may be learned."

"To learn is simple. Don't you ask questions?" inquired the Scarecrow.

"Yes; I ask as many questions as I dare; but some people refuse to answer questions."

"That is not kind of them," declared the Tin Woodman." If one does not ask for information he seldom receives it; so I, for my part, make it a rule to answer any civil question that is asked me."

"So do I," added the Scarecrow, nodding.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 10, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Don't buy from Bottom of the Hill Publishing

    All of L. Frank Baum's Oz books are fantastic. The trouble with this specific book is not the book itself but the publisher: Bottom of the Hill Publishing. It's more like bottom of the barrel. The cover is pixelated and there are hardly any illustrations, if any at all, in any of their Oz books. The pages appear to have been typed up and printed at anyone's home computer. Do yourself a favor, don't buy from Bottom of the Hill Publishing.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 19, 2012

    I like it

    It is a good book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 25, 2014

    You may notice that the reviews being displayed here are from 20

    You may notice that the reviews being displayed here are from 2012, even though this book was published in March 2014. I would suggest ignoring any reviews before the release date because they have NOTHING to do with THIS publication! Eltanin Publishing releases some of the most beautiful ebooks available, and this messed-up review section is a disservice to both customers and publisher.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 18, 2012

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    0 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 21, 2010

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