The Tin Woodman of Oz (Oz Series #12)

The Tin Woodman of Oz (Oz Series #12)

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by L. Frank Baum, John R. Neill, Peter Glassman
     
 

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Join the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow as they journey across the fantastic magical Land of Oz in search of the Tin Woodman's long-lost sweetheart. In a series of adventures sure to thrill Oz fans both old and new, these beloved friends face such challenges as a selfish giantess and a group of quarrelsome dragons—all to fulfill a promise made long ago to a

Overview

Join the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow as they journey across the fantastic magical Land of Oz in search of the Tin Woodman's long-lost sweetheart. In a series of adventures sure to thrill Oz fans both old and new, these beloved friends face such challenges as a selfish giantess and a group of quarrelsome dragons—all to fulfill a promise made long ago to a beautiful Munchkin girl.

The Tin Woodman sits on the glittering tin throne of his splendid tin castle, ruling the Winkle Country of the Land of Oz with the help of his best friend, the Scarecrow. All is peaceful and well, but when a young wanderer named Woot asks the Tin Woodman how he came to be made of tin, the emperor recalls his days as a flesh-and-blood woodchopper and his love for Nimmie Amee, a Munchkin girl so fair that the sunsets blushed when they fell upon her.

The three quickly decide to set out on a daring quest to reunite the Tin Woodman with his lost love and ask Nimmie Amee to be Empress of the Winkie Country. During their travels, they battle dragons and loons, a mighty sorceress, and an all-too-hungry beast called the Hippo-gy-raf. Luckily, they are joined in their search by their old friend Polychrome, the Rainbow's Daughter, and are aided by Dorothy and Princess Ozma—the powerful fairy ruler of the Land of Oz. But just when they think their troubles are over and their quest is complete, they discover a surprise that leaves all of them truly astounded!

This deluxe edition of the rare first edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill's beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black-and-white drawings, making this a book sure to be treasured for years to come.

In a series of adventures sure to thrill OZ fans both old and new, the Tin Woodman and the Scarecrow journey across the magical Land of Oz in search of the Tin Woodman's long-lost sweetheart, a beautiful Munchkin girl. This deluxe edition of the rare first edition features all twelve of Oz artist John R. Neill's beautiful color plates, along with his nearly one hundred black and white drawings, and is a great way to celebrate the upcoming centenary of Oz!

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780688149765
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/28/1999
Series:
Oz Series, #12
Pages:
336
Product dimensions:
6.75(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Woot the Wanderer

The Tin Woodman sat on his glittering tin throne in the handsome tin hall of his splendid tin castle in the Winkie Country of the Land of Oz. Beside him, in a chair of woven straw, sat his best friend, the Scarecrow of Oz. At times they spoke to one another of curious things they had seen and strange adventures they had known since first they two had met and become comrades. But at times they were silent, for these things had been talked over many times between them, and they found themselves contented in merely being together, speaking now and then a brief sentence to prove they were wide awake and attentive. But then, these two quaint persons never slept. Why should they sleep, when they never tired?

And now, as the brilliant sun sank low over the Winkie Country of Oz, tinting the glistening tin towers and tin minarets of the tin castle with glorious sunset hues, there approached along a winding pathway Woot the Wanderer, who met at the castle entrance a Winkie servant.

The servants of the Tin Woodman all wore tin helmets and tin breastplates and uniforms covered with tiny tin discs sewed closely together on silver cloth, so that their bodies sparkled as beautifully as did the tin castle-and almost as beautifully as did the Tin Woodman himself.

Woot the Wanderer looked at the man servantall bright and glittering-and at the magnificent castle-all bright and glittering-and as he looked his eyes grew big with wonder. For Woot was not very big and not very old and, wanderer though he was, this proved the most gorgeous sight that had ever met his boyish gaze.

"Who lives here?" he asked.

" The Emperor of the Pinkies,who is the famous Tin Woodman of Oz," replied the servant, who had been trained to treat all strangers with courtesy.

"A Tin Woodman I How queer l" exclaimed the little wanderer.

"Well, perhaps our Emperor is queer," admitted the servant; " but he is a kind master and as honest and true as good tin can make him; so we, who gladly serve him, are apt to forget that he is not like other people."

" May I see him` " asked Woot the Wanderer, after a moment's thought.

"If it please you to wait a moment, I will go and ask him," said the servant, and then he went into the hall where the Tin Woodman sat with his friend the Scarecrow. Both were glad to learn that a stranger had arrived at the castle, for this would give them something new to talk about, so the servant was asked to admit the boy at once.

By the time Woot the Wanderer had passedthrough the grand corridors -- all lined with ornamental tin -- and under stately tin archways and through the many tin rooms all set with beautiful tin furniture, his eyes had grown bigger than ever and his whole little body thrilled with amazement. But, astonished though he was, he was able to make a polite bow before the throne and to say in a respectful voice: " I salute your Illustrious Majesty and offer you my humble services."

"Very good! " answered the Tin Woodman in his accustomed cheerful manner. " Tell me who you are, and whence you come."

"I am known as Woot the Wanderer," answered the boy, "and I have come, through many travels and by roundabout ways, from my former home in a far corner of the Gillikin Country of Oz."

"To wander from one's home," remarked the Scarecrow, " is to encounter dangers and hardships, especially if one is made of meat and bone. Had you no friends in that corner of the Gillikin Country? Vas it not homelike and comfortable?"

To hear a man stuffed with straw speak, and speak so well, quite startled Woot, and perhaps he stared a bit rudely at the Scarecrow. But after a moment he replied:

"I had home and friends, your Honorable Strawness, but they were so quiet and happy and comfortable that I found them dismally stupid. Nothing in that corner of Oz interested me, but I believed that in other parts of the country I would find strange people and see new sights, and so I set out upon my wandering journey. I have been a wanderer for nearly a full year, and now my wanderings have brought me to this splendid castle."

"I suppose," said the Tin Woodman, " that in this year you have seen so much that you have become very wise."

"No," replied Woot, thoughtfully, " I am not at all wise, I beg to assure your Majesty. The more I wander the less I find that I know, for in the Land of Oz much wisdom and many things may be learned."

"To learn is simple. Don't you ask questions?" inquired the Scarecrow.

"Yes; I ask as many questions as I dare; but some people refuse to answer questions."

"That is not kind of them," declared the Tin Woodman." If one does not ask for information he seldom receives it; so I, for my part, make it a rule to answer any civil question that is asked me."

"So do I," added the Scarecrow, nodding.

Meet the Author

L. Frank Baum (1856-1919) published The Wonderful Wizard of Oz in 1900 and received enormous, immediate success. Baum went on to write seventeen additional novels in the Oz series. Today, he is considered the father of the American fairy tale. His stories inspired the 1939 classic film The Wizard of Oz, one of the most widely viewed movies of all time.

Michael Sieben is a professional designer and illustrator, primarily within the sub-culture of skateboarding, whose work has been exhibited and reviewed worldwide as well as featured in numerous illustration anthologies. He is a staff writer and illustrator for Thrasher magazine, and a weekly columnist for VICE.com. He is also a founding member of Okay Mountain Gallery and Collective in Austin, Texas, as well as the cofounder of Roger Skateboards. The author of There's Nothing Wrong with You (Hopefully), he lives and works in Austin.

John R. Neill was born in Philadelphia in 1877. In 1904, at the age of twenty-six, Neill received his first major book assignment, as illustrator for The Marvelous Land of Oz. From then until his death in 1943, Neill would illustrate over forty Oz books, including three he wrote himself. Today, his fabulous illustrations are synonymous with Oz.

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
May 15, 1856
Date of Death:
May 6, 1919
Place of Birth:
Chittenango, New York
Place of Death:
Hollywood, California
Education:
Attended Peekskill Military Academy and Syracuse Classical School

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The Tin Woodman Of Oz 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
OonaEleven More than 1 year ago
All of L. Frank Baum's Oz books are fantastic. The trouble with this specific book is not the book itself but the publisher: Bottom of the Hill Publishing. It's more like bottom of the barrel. The cover is pixelated and there are hardly any illustrations, if any at all, in any of their Oz books. The pages appear to have been typed up and printed at anyone's home computer. Do yourself a favor, don't buy from Bottom of the Hill Publishing.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is a good book
Nonsuch More than 1 year ago
You may notice that the reviews being displayed here are from 2012, even though this book was published in March 2014. I would suggest ignoring any reviews before the release date because they have NOTHING to do with THIS publication! Eltanin Publishing releases some of the most beautiful ebooks available, and this messed-up review section is a disservice to both customers and publisher.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
All in the title. ---Roxas
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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