Tippy and the Night Parade

Overview

When Tippy wakes up, there’s a peacock in her bedroom, a bird in her hair, and mice dancing on the headboard. Yet all Tippy remembers is falling asleep! In her first book for children, award-winning cartoonist Lilli Carré takes Tippy on a nocturnal adventure up a mountain, down a hole, and back home again.
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Overview

When Tippy wakes up, there’s a peacock in her bedroom, a bird in her hair, and mice dancing on the headboard. Yet all Tippy remembers is falling asleep! In her first book for children, award-winning cartoonist Lilli Carré takes Tippy on a nocturnal adventure up a mountain, down a hole, and back home again.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
12/02/2013
Carré (Heads or Tails) brings her talents to a younger audience with the story of a girl’s somnambulism and the chaos it creates. Except for a few scenes bathed in the pale oranges of sunset and sunrise, Carré uses a palette of steely gray-blues as bedheaded Tippy strides out the front door—eyes closed, and the trace of a smile on her lips. Tippy narrates in suppositional speech bubbles (she’s a sleep-talker, too). “Maybe I walked out into the garden,” she muses, doing just that as a protective crab clings to her nightgown, “because I wanted to hop across the lily pads.” As Tippy wanders through Carré’s panels, falling down a “big hole” and emerging in a cactus patch, she acquires a train of animals that leave her bedroom in disarray. “What is this mess?” her mother shouts the next morning. “I don’t know, Mama,” Tippy replies as a goat chews on her hair. “All I remember... is falling asleep!” Carré’s curvy cartoons brim with quirky humor, and although Tippy is unconscious throughout her adventure, it’s evident that she’s the sort of girl whose waking life is plenty interesting, too. Ages 4–8. (Feb.)
From the Publisher
While respectably hardcover and didactically appended with suggestions for reading guidance, "Tippy" uses the paneled art and speech balloons of comics and displays its downtown roots through an offbeat color palette (cantaloupe, chocolate and gunmetal blue), blithe generalization of form and a bed-headed heroine who looks as much the hipster gamin as she does a little girl.
—The New York Times Book Review

In her first book for young children, cartoonist Carré repeats key phrases in the text to help beginning readers... Tippy’s calm, sleepy suppositions clash deliciously with the gradually increasing disorder found in the accompanying panels. Young readers will delight in all the crazy details: the mice dancing on the headboard of Tippy’s bed; the mole’s hilarious devotion to the bear; the goat chewing Tippy’s hair as the story ends. Carré skillfully employs a limited color palette, with warm oranges underscoring the messy mayhem of Tippy’s room and cool midnight blues and slate grays providing a serene backdrop for Tippy’s late-night ramblings.
—The Horn Book

This quirky comic for early readers offers simple panels with easy-to-find details and monochromatic color schemes–orange for the day and shades of blue for the night. ... Consistent with the Toon Book line, tips for reading comics with children appear in the back matter. Carré’s retro and dreamy illustrations readily lend themselves to visual literacy practices: kids can "ham it up" with sound effects (bumps, scrapes, and animal sounds), and parents and educators can let children guess about the context of the pictures.
—School Library Journal

A beguiling tale of a girl who sleepwalks into a midnight-blue dreamscape, leaving her with a mysteriously messy bedroom—and a bird on her head.
—FamilyFun

Children's Literature - Leona Illig
Tippy’s mother is perplexed. Her daughter’s bedroom is filled with strange animals every morning: a horse, bats, a rabbit, a pig, and even a peacock, among others. As a result, Tippy and her mother have to clean the bedroom every morning to get rid of the mess. But where do all these animals come from? Tippy does not know; all she can remember is falling asleep. She wonders if she has been sleepwalking outside her house, into the garden, and across the lake—perhaps she has even fallen down a giant hole! With her imagination as her guide, Tippy tries to solve the mystery of the animals in her bedroom. The plot is imaginative and should spur questions from readers about the nature of dreams. The colors are superb. Different hues of strong, solid colors are presented on each two-page spread, and they are pleasing to the eye. Young readers will want to make sure that they look closely at each illustration, since there are small and humorous details in almost all of them. The publisher categorizes this as a level one, “first comics for brand-new readers” book, with 200-300 easy sight words, short sentences, and one to two panels per page. At the back of the book are some tips on how to read comics with young children. The publisher also supplies free online cartoon instructions and lesson plans on its website. While this book may be designed for new readers, even young children should enjoy having this book read to them, especially at bedtime. Reviewer: Leona Illig; Ages 3 to 6.
School Library Journal
03/01/2014
K-Gr 3—This quirky comic for early readers offers simple panels with easy-to-find details and monochromatic color schemes-orange for the day and shades of blue for the night. When Tippy wakes in the morning, her room is a mess of shells, plants, and animals that have somehow found their way into her house. Readers will be able to guess at the answer as the girl recounts what could have happened: she sleepwalks outdoors, seemingly taking a night stroll, and gathers a following of animals who watch over her throughout her nocturnal adventure. Consistent with the Toon Book line, tips for reading comics with children appear in the back matter. Carré's retro and dreamy illustrations readily lend themselves to visual literacy practices: kids can "ham it up" with sound effects (bumps, scrapes, and animal sounds), and parents and educators can let children guess about the context of the pictures.—Joanna K. Fabicon, Los Angeles Public Library
Kirkus Reviews
2013-12-11
A sleepwalking child picks up an animal entourage—every night—in this winsome, circular debut. When her annoyed mom wonders how her room came to be such a mess, Tippy can only shrug and speculate: "Maybe last night I walked out the door…." In a re-enactment that is also a new adventure, she passes over a dock, through a misty wood, down a deep hole, through a cactus patch and so back home. Along the way, she unconsciously collects a train of creatures, from a bee to a bear, that all make a new mess for her mother to discover in the morning. Interactions among the animals following her add small subplots and side actions: A frog pursues a bumblebee that's always just out of tongue's reach; a little mole falls in love with a bear that does not reciprocate. Dressed in a comfy gown and striped socks, Tippy strolls, climbs and drifts in smiling slumber through a succession of flat, sometimes-silhouetted scenes done in restful blues and grays. Occasional sound effects and comments in dialogue balloons furnish the text for her nightly ramble. A dreamy, slightly more visually sophisticated alternative to Peggy Rathmann's Good Night, Gorilla (1994). (Graphic early reader. 4-6)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781935179573
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication date: 2/11/2014
  • Series: Toon Series
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 270,979
  • Age range: 4 - 8 Years
  • Lexile: GN240L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Lilli Carré’s books of comics include The Lagoon, Nine Ways to Disappear, and Tales of Woodsman Pete. Her artwork has appeared in Best American Comics and the Best American Nonrequired Reading. She is also a filmmaker and the co-director of Eyeworks, an experimental animation festival. Lilli Carré grew up in California and now lives in Chicago.
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