Tissue, Cell and Organ Engineering / Edition 1

Tissue, Cell and Organ Engineering / Edition 1

by Challa S. S. R. Kumar
     
 

ISBN-10: 3527313893

ISBN-13: 9783527313891

Pub. Date: 01/02/2007

Publisher: Wiley

This volume collects the knowledge on how to bring nanomaterials and strategies together for assembling functional and structural artificial tissues. Treating tissue engineering in a materials science context—from nanomaterials to functional tissues—the text covers strategies, technologies and biological effects, drawing on a wide range of material types,

Overview

This volume collects the knowledge on how to bring nanomaterials and strategies together for assembling functional and structural artificial tissues. Treating tissue engineering in a materials science context—from nanomaterials to functional tissues—the text covers strategies, technologies and biological effects, drawing on a wide range of material types, including organic and inorganic materials, fibrous polymer scaffolds, nanocrystals, magnetic nanoparticles, nanotubes and nanowires.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9783527313891
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
01/02/2007
Series:
Nanotechnologies for the Life Sciences Series , #4
Pages:
540
Product dimensions:
6.97(w) x 9.69(h) x 1.23(d)

Table of Contents

Preface.

List of Authors.

1 Nanotechnology and Tissue Engineering: The Scaffold Based Approach (Lakshmi S. Nair, Subhabrata Bhattacharyya, and Cato T. Laurencin).

1.1 Overview.

1.2 Introduction.

1.3 The Importance of Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering.

1.4 Structure and Functions of Natural Extracellular Matrix.

1.5 Applications of Nanotechnology in Developing Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering.

1.6 Cell Behavior Towards Nano-based Matrices.

1.7 Applications of Nano-based Matrices as Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering.

1.8 Conclusions.

References.

2 Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering (Seow Hoon Saw, Karen Wang, Thomas Yong, and Seeram Ramakrishna).

2.1 Overview.

2.2 Introduction.

2.3 Classification of Nanofibers.

2.4 Nanofiber Fabrication.

2.5 Degradation and Absorption Kinetics of Nanofiber Scaffolds Compared with Conventional Scaffolds.

2.6 Advantages and Disadvantages of Nanofiber Scaffolds Compared with Other Conventional Scaffolds.

2.7 Biocompatibility of Nano-structured Tissue Engineered Implants.

2.8 Applications of Polymeric Nanofibers in Tissue Engineering.

2.9 Innovations in Nanofiber Scaffolds.

2.10 Conclusion.

References.

3 Electrospinning Technology for Nanofibrous Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering (Wan-Ju Li, Rabie M. Shanti, and Rocky S. Tuan).

3.1 Introduction.

3.2 Nanofibrous Scaffolds.

3.3 Current Development of Electrospun Nanofibrous Scaffolds in Tissue Engineering.

3.4 Current Challenges and Future Directions.

3.5 Conclusion.

References.

4 Nanofibrous Scaffolds and their Biological Effects (Laura A. Smith, Jonathan A. Beck, and Peter X. Ma).

4.1 Overview.

4.2 Introduction.

4.3 Methods of Formation.

4.4 Nanofibrous Composite Scaffolds.

4.5 Biological Effects of Nanofibers.

4.6 Tissue Formation.

4.7 Conclusion.

References.

5 Nanophase Biomaterials for Tissue Engineering (Ramalingam Murugan and Seeram Ramakrishna).

5.1 Introduction: Problems with Current Therapies.

5.2 Tissue Engineering: A Potential Solution.

5.3 Stem Cells: The Essentials.

5.4 Nanobiomaterials: A New Generation Scaffolding Material.

5.5 Nanofibrous Scaffold Processing: Current Scenarios.

5.6 Cellâ??Matrix (Scaffold) Interactions.

5.7 Concluding Remarks.

Acknowledgments.

Abbreviations.

Glossary.

References.

6 Orthopedic Tissue Engineering Using Nanomaterials (Michiko Sato and Thomas J. Webster).

6.1 Preface.

6.2 Introduction: Problems with Current Implants.

6.3 A Potential Solution: Nanotechnology.

6.4 Considerations and Future Directions.

Acknowledgments.

References.

7 Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals as Bone Tissue Substitute (Norberto Roveri and Barbara Palazzo).

7.1 Overview.

7.2 Introduction.

7.3 Biogenic Hydroxyapatite: Bone and Teeth.

7.4 Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite: Porous and Substituted Apatites.

7.5 Biologically Inspired Hydroxyapatite: HAâ??Collagen Composites and Coatings.

7.6 Functionalized Hydroxyapatite: HA Nanocrystals â?? Bioactive Molecules.

7.7 Conclusion and Future Challenges.

Acknowledgments.

References.

8 Magnetic Nanoparticles for Tissue Engineering (Akira Ito and Hiroyuki Honda).

8.1 Introduction.

8.2 Mesenchymal Stem Cell Isolation and Expansion.

8.3 Mag-seeding.

8.4 Construction of 3D Tissue-like Structure.

8.5 Conclusion.

References.

9 Applications and Implications of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes in Tissue Engineering (Peter S. McFetridge and Matthias U. Nollert).

9.1 Introduction.

9.2 Electromagnetic Fields for Tissue Regeneration.

9.3 Tissue Engineering.

9.4 SWNT Preparation: Purification and Functionalization.

9.5 Specific Applications of Carbon Nanotubes in Tissue Engineering.

9.6 Conclusions.

References.

10 Nanoparticles for Cell Engineering â?? A Radical Concept (Beverly A. Rzigalinski, Igor Danelisen, Elizabeth T. Strawn, Courtney A. Cohen, and Chengya Liang).

10.1 Introduction and Overview.

10.2 Free Radicals and Oxidative Stress.

10.3 A Nanotechnological Approach to Oxidative Stress.

10.4 Nano-pharmacology.

10.5 Nanoparticle Antioxidants and Treatment of Disease.

10.6 Toxicology.

10.7 Summary.

References.

11 Nanoparticles and Nanowires for Cellular Engineering (Jessica O. Winter).

11.1 Introduction.

11.2 Biological Opportunities at the Nanoscale.

11.3 Nanostructures to Modify Cell Adhesion and Migration.

11.4 Nanostructure Cellular Entry.

11.5 Intracellular Transport of Nanostructures.

11.6 Biomolecule Delivery Using Nanostructures.

11.7 Protein Manipulation.

11.8 Summary and Conclusions.

References.

12 Nanoengineering of Biomaterial Surfaces (Ashwath Jayagopal and Venkatram Prasad Shastri).

12.1 Introduction.

12.2 Conventional Photolithography.

12.3 Electron-beam Lithography.

12.4 Soft Lithography.

12.5 Polymer-demixed Nanotopographies.

12.6 Star-shaped and other Novel Polymer Structures.

12.7 Vapor Deposition.

12.8 Self-assembly.

12.9 Particle Blasting.

12.10 Ion Beam and Plasma-guided Surface Engineering.

12.11 Solâ??Gel Technology.

12.12 Nanolithography.

12.13 Laser-guided Strategies.

12.14 Rapid Prototyping Techniques.

12.15 Conclusions.

Acknowledgments.

References.

Index.

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