Titanic: One Newspaper, Seven Days, and the Truth That Shocked the World

Titanic: One Newspaper, Seven Days, and the Truth That Shocked the World

3.1 11
by Stephen Hines
     
 

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Montreal, Monday (6.00 a.m.) April 15, 1912

TITANIC STRUCK AN ICEBERG. SENDS MARCONIGRAM ASKING FOR ASSISTANCE. VIRGINIAN GOING TO HER RESCUE.

From New York, Monday. April 15, 1912

"VESSEL SINKING"

STEAMERS ARE TOWING THE TITANIC. AND ENDEAVOURING TO GET HER INTO THE SHOAL WATER NEAR CAPE RACE. FOR THE PURPOSE OF BEACHING HER.

From New York, Monday night.

…  See more details below

Overview

Montreal, Monday (6.00 a.m.) April 15, 1912

TITANIC STRUCK AN ICEBERG. SENDS MARCONIGRAM ASKING FOR ASSISTANCE. VIRGINIAN GOING TO HER RESCUE.

From New York, Monday. April 15, 1912

"VESSEL SINKING"

STEAMERS ARE TOWING THE TITANIC. AND ENDEAVOURING TO GET HER INTO THE SHOAL WATER NEAR CAPE RACE. FOR THE PURPOSE OF BEACHING HER.

From New York, Monday night. April 15, 1912

THE WHITE STAR OFFICIALS NOW ADMIT THAT MANY LIVES HAVE BEEN LOST.

News of the Titanic's catastrophic sinking, days after her maiden voyage, shocked the world. The public was frantic for information and answers, and the London Daily Telegraph, the largest circulating newspaper in the world at the time, was charged with the task of relaying what exactly had happened to the luxury liner. But with false reports abounding and no access to survivors, that task was easier said than done.

Read how a paper, and the world, struggled to find and report the truth of the most disastrous maritime accident in history.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Over a dozen films and hundreds of books have told the tragic tale of Titanic's sinking, but coming up on the 100 year anniversary of its icy demise, Hines offers this from the headlines account of the events as they unfolded in the week that followed. No tweets, twitters or cell phone messages in 1912, so news traveled slowly. The first accounts reported that Titanic sunk but everyone survived. The truth emerged bit by bit while the world followed. This book puts the reader in the audience to experience those same emotions.

This book is a fascinating look at the coverage of the Daily Telegraph of London.

Library Journal
The 100th anniversary in 2012 of the sinking of Titanic is bringing about a surfeit of books on the subject, and this contribution fills a particular niche. Hines ("I Remember Laura": Laura Ingalls Wilder) reprints the coverage of the disaster by the London Daily Telegraph, the largest circulating newspaper of the time, and adds his own commentary. The results are useful as a gathering of source material (much like the published transcripts of the official U.S. and UK inquires into the sinking) but not completely successful as an examination of contemporary news reporting as suggested in the book's promotional material ("Read how a paper and the world struggled to find and report the truth"). Hines makes the obligatory reference to news being different "before television and Twitter" and notes generally how reporters sometimes fabricated details when none was available. VERDICT The author, in his notes, tut-tuts about the hubris of the ship's owner and builders and of the idea of man conquering nature with an "unsinkable" ship (as all books about Titanic seem to do), but he is good at explaining differences between what was reported in the newspaper articles and what actually happened. Best for Titanic buffs, not necessarily for the general reader.—Megan Hahn Fraser, Univ. of California-Los Angeles Lib.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781402256653
Publisher:
Sourcebooks
Publication date:
09/01/2011
Pages:
272
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.80(d)

Meet the Author

In the last twenty-four years, Stephen W. Hines has published sixteen books with over 600,000 copies in print. He is the author of Little House in the Ozarks, a Publishers Weekly bestseller, I Remember Laura, and The Quiet Little Woman. Hines lives near Nashville with his family and writes a column for The Nolensville Dispatch.

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Titanic 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It is a book worth reading
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
An invigorating read! I whole-heartedly recommend this one to historical Titanic buffs. It leads you through the prominent newspapers during the days following the Titanic's sinking. The headlines & stories vary from each other, contradicting each other when no truth was known about the Titanic's fate. Stephen Hines has craftily pieced together the running theme of the newspapers that tragic week in April 1912. I especially enjoyed seeing what reporters in New York were saying in contrast with London, both cities being greatly affected by the ship's fate. This is a fantastic book and I learned so much by reading it!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book suck if i were you you souldnt buy this book and im going to get this book off my nook
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I forgot
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Never read it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Plz
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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