Titus Andronicus (Folger Shakespeare Library Series) by William Shakespeare, NOOK Book (eBook) | Barnes & Noble
Titus Andronicus

Titus Andronicus

4.0 18
by William Shakespeare
     
 

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940149717163
Publisher:
Kartindo Publishing House
Publication date:
06/13/2014
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
78 KB

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Titus Andronicus (Folger Shakespeare Library Series) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 18 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
If i could put one word to discribe this it would be DAMMIT
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Literature_In_Arkansas More than 1 year ago
Titus Andronicus is a spectacular story of Social Status, rape, mutilation, deception, and pure evil. Titus is a Roman General who has just returned from war with the Goths. He has returned to Rome with the Goth queen, her sons, and her lover as prisoners. Titus has also returned with his 25 warrior sons, 21 of whom are dead. They return to find that the emperor has died and there is a sort of city meeting held to determine who will follow as emporer. The choice is between the Emperor's two sons, Saturnine and Bassianus, and Titus. Titus would become emporer if he didn't decline. In a turn of events, Saturnine becomes emporer and ends up marrying The queen of the very people that Titus has just conquered. Tamorah, the Goth queen, uses her new status to manipulate Titus and his sons. Aaron the Moor, Tamorah's lover, is responsible for instigating most of the heinous acts of rape and torture. This is considered to be one of Shakespeare's earliest works and is a little rough around the edges as far as character development. It is nonetheless a good read, whether for pleasure or schoolwork.
Mirth More than 1 year ago
Color can provide powerful imagery and insight in any story. Most can identify with color imagery in film, but in writing it is just as valuable of a tool. In Titus Andronicus, Shakespeare uses color for character development and foreshadowing. Throughout the text, Shakespeare uses color to give the reader a sense of what is to come. In Act 2 Scene 2 Titus proclaims, "The hunt is up, the moon is bright and gray" (1). Gray is a drab color, one that is cool and uninteresting and carries with it a sober tone of sorrow. Although the events are pleasing to the characters as the scene begins, the color chosen by the author is one of sadness and disappointment. This choice has purpose. He is foreshadowing by showing the reader that although the "moon is bright", or the events of the day appear enjoyable, the overall outcome will be "gray". Then he fulfills on the unstated promise of sorrow when Bassianus is slain and Lavinia is raped and maimed. (Also intriguing are the choice of opening words, "the hunt is up"---meaning not only the hunt for wild game but the sexual hunt of Demetrius and Chiron for the woman Lavinia. An idea to be fully developed elsewhere). The color gray could also be interpreted to represent the shady nature of the personalities in the play. Characters like Demetrius, Chiron, Tamora, and Aaron are all lying convincingly to the protagonists. The gray could be representative of the veiled machinations of their wicked plots or the general location of their moral character (i.e. in the "gray area"). Furthermore, In Act 2 Scene 3, Bassianus and Lavinia unknowingly foreshadow while using color to depict character when they say, "Why are you sequester'd from all your train,/ Dismounted from your snow-white goodly steed,/ And wander'd hither to an obscure plot..?/...let her joy in her raven-colour'd love;/ This valley fits the purpose passing well" (75-77, 83-84). Here Tamora is characterized by the "snow-white goodly steed" reference. She has "dismounted" from the goodly steed of her husband Saturninus and mounted another (referring to her sexual affair with Aaron the Moor). Also white is typically considered a pure or righteous hue. If Tamora has distanced herself from the "snow-white" then symbolically she is unrighteous and without purity. Shakespeare then hints at the purpose of Tamora and Aaron's rendezvous by calling the area an "obscure plot". The two met to bring their wicked plans to fruition and they commenced with the slaying of Bassianus (one of their many "obscure plots"). The reference to their "raven-colour'd love" is also heavily layered. Raven is black, often personified as evil or unclean. Tamora and Aaron are having an illicit affair unbeknownst to the emperor, a truly 'black' deed. Also there is reference to the color of Aaron's skin, he is a Moor and is therefore of dark complexion. The foreshadowing of this moment is lost to all the characters in the scene because Tamora does not find out until later that she is pregnant. When the black child is born it is the physical representation of their "raven-colour'd love".
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Absoutley the most graphic novel I've ever read in my life. It's mesmerizing charcters, complex and overwhelming plots, the magnificent creations of evil upon evil, and the ultimate sacrifice of love is all presented here in this, striking, stunning, groundbreaking play by Shakespeare. The most macabre play to come out in a long time, sensual, fervent, and hypnotic.A insightful,delicious story. A very entertaining and deeply moving novel about the complexities of families. Shakespeare's haunting masterpiece. Vivid, brilliant,unforgettable.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Titus, in my opinion, is one of the most fascinating works by William Shakespeare I've read so far. I certaintly recomend this book to any of those with a wild imagination and an open mind. These lines can take you to a place you never could have imagined before,but now you will.