Titus Andronicus

Overview

Shakespeare's Tragedy about Titus Andronicus.
Republished by Cavalier Classics.
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Titus Andronicus (Pelican Shakespeare Series)

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Overview

Shakespeare's Tragedy about Titus Andronicus.
Republished by Cavalier Classics.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Review of the first edition: 'The great strength of Hughes's edition is its attention to the theatrical aspects of the play ... his discussion of the play in performance is illuminating.' Studies in English Literature
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9783849167141
  • Publisher: tredition GmbH
  • Publication date: 12/4/2012
  • Pages: 96
  • Product dimensions: 5.25 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.23 (d)

Meet the Author

François Guizot, pour l'état civil François Pierre Guillaume Guizot, né le 4 octobre 1787 à Nîmes, mort le 12 septembre 1874 à Saint-Ouen-le-Pin (Calvados), est un historien et homme politique français, membre de l'Académie française à partir de 1836, plusieurs fois ministre sous la Monarchie de Juillet, en particulier des Affaires étrangères de 1840 à 1848, devenant président du Conseil en 1847, peu avant d'être renversé par la révolution de février 1848.

Il a aussi joué un rôle important dans l'histoire de l'école en France, en tant que ministre de l'Instruction publique, par la loi de 1833, demandant la création d'une école primaire par commune et d'une école normale par département.

William Shakespeare, né probablement le 23 avril 1564 à Stratford-upon-Avon et mort le 23 avril 1616 dans la même ville, est considéré comme l'un des plus grands poètes, dramaturges et écrivains de la culture anglaise. Il est réputé pour sa maîtrise des formes poétiques et littéraires, ainsi que sa capacité à représenter les aspects de la nature humaine.

Figure éminente de la culture occidentale, Shakespeare continue d'influencer les artistes d'aujourd'hui. Il est traduit dans un grand nombre de langues et, selon l'Index Translationum, avec un total de 4 281 traductions, il vient au troisième rang des auteurs les plus traduits en langue étrangère après Agatha Christie et Jules Verne. Ses pièces sont régulièrement jouées partout dans le monde. Shakespeare est l'un des rares dramaturges à avoir pratiqué aussi bien la comédie que la tragédie.

Shakespeare écrivit trente-sept œuvres dramatiques, entre les années 1580 et 1613. Mais la chronologie exacte de ses pièces est encore discutée. Cependant, le volume de ses créations n'apparaît pas comme exceptionnel en regard de critères de l'époque.

On mesure l'influence de Shakespeare sur la culture anglo-saxonne en observant les nombreuses références qui lui sont faites, que ce soit à travers des citations, des titres d'œuvres ou les innombrables adaptations de ses œuvres. L'anglais est d'ailleurs souvent surnommé la langue de Shakespeare tant cet auteur a marqué la langue de son pays en inventant de nombreux termes et expressions. Certaines citations d'ailleurs sont passées telles quelles dans le langage courant.

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Preface; List of abbreviations and conventions; Introduction: Date; Sources; Authorship; Early stage history; The Longleat manuscript; From the Restoration to the nineteenth century; Twentieth-century performance and criticism; Recent stage, film and critical interpretations by Sue Hall-Smith; Note on the text; List of characters; The Play; Textual analysis; Appendix 1. Titus Andronicus at the Rose; Appendix 2. Performance by a small company; Reading list.

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  • Posted April 8, 2010

    Now I know Shakespeare can write Gore

    Titus Andronicus is a spectacular story of Social Status, rape, mutilation, deception, and pure evil. Titus is a Roman General who has just returned from war with the Goths. He has returned to Rome with the Goth queen, her sons, and her lover as prisoners. Titus has also returned with his 25 warrior sons, 21 of whom are dead. They return to find that the emperor has died and there is a sort of city meeting held to determine who will follow as emporer. The choice is between the Emperor's two sons, Saturnine and Bassianus, and Titus. Titus would become emporer if he didn't decline. In a turn of events, Saturnine becomes emporer and ends up marrying The queen of the very people that Titus has just conquered. Tamorah, the Goth queen, uses her new status to manipulate Titus and his sons. Aaron the Moor, Tamorah's lover, is responsible for instigating most of the heinous acts of rape and torture. This is considered to be one of Shakespeare's earliest works and is a little rough around the edges as far as character development. It is nonetheless a good read, whether for pleasure or schoolwork.

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  • Posted February 22, 2010

    more from this reviewer

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    The Pigments of a Tragedy

    Color can provide powerful imagery and insight in any story. Most can identify with color imagery in film, but in writing it is just as valuable of a tool. In Titus Andronicus, Shakespeare uses color for character development and foreshadowing.

    Throughout the text, Shakespeare uses color to give the reader a sense of what is to come. In Act 2 Scene 2 Titus proclaims, "The hunt is up, the moon is bright and gray" (1). Gray is a drab color, one that is cool and uninteresting and carries with it a sober tone of sorrow. Although the events are pleasing to the characters as the scene begins, the color chosen by the author is one of sadness and disappointment. This choice has purpose. He is foreshadowing by showing the reader that although the "moon is bright", or the events of the day appear enjoyable, the overall outcome will be "gray". Then he fulfills on the unstated promise of sorrow when Bassianus is slain and Lavinia is raped and maimed. (Also intriguing are the choice of opening words, "the hunt is up"---meaning not only the hunt for wild game but the sexual hunt of Demetrius and Chiron for the woman Lavinia. An idea to be fully developed elsewhere). The color gray could also be interpreted to represent the shady nature of the personalities in the play. Characters like Demetrius, Chiron, Tamora, and Aaron are all lying convincingly to the protagonists. The gray could be representative of the veiled machinations of their wicked plots or the general location of their moral character (i.e. in the "gray area").

    Furthermore, In Act 2 Scene 3, Bassianus and Lavinia unknowingly foreshadow while using color to depict character when they say, "Why are you sequester'd from all your train,/ Dismounted from your snow-white goodly steed,/ And wander'd hither to an obscure plot..?/...let her joy in her raven-colour'd love;/ This valley fits the purpose passing well" (75-77, 83-84). Here Tamora is characterized by the "snow-white goodly steed" reference. She has "dismounted" from the goodly steed of her husband Saturninus and mounted another (referring to her sexual affair with Aaron the Moor). Also white is typically considered a pure or righteous hue. If Tamora has distanced herself from the "snow-white" then symbolically she is unrighteous and without purity. Shakespeare then hints at the purpose of Tamora and Aaron's rendezvous by calling the area an "obscure plot". The two met to bring their wicked plans to fruition and they commenced with the slaying of Bassianus (one of their many "obscure plots"). The reference to their "raven-colour'd love" is also heavily layered. Raven is black, often personified as evil or unclean. Tamora and Aaron are having an illicit affair unbeknownst to the emperor, a truly 'black' deed. Also there is reference to the color of Aaron's skin, he is a Moor and is therefore of dark complexion. The foreshadowing of this moment is lost to all the characters in the scene because Tamora does not find out until later that she is pregnant. When the black child is born it is the physical representation of their "raven-colour'd love".

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2002

    A delightfully diabolical.. menacing read of pure horror..

    Absoutley the most graphic novel I've ever read in my life. It's mesmerizing charcters, complex and overwhelming plots, the magnificent creations of evil upon evil, and the ultimate sacrifice of love is all presented here in this, striking, stunning, groundbreaking play by Shakespeare. The most macabre play to come out in a long time, sensual, fervent, and hypnotic.A insightful,delicious story. A very entertaining and deeply moving novel about the complexities of families. Shakespeare's haunting masterpiece. Vivid, brilliant,unforgettable.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 18, 2001

    Titus Andronicus

    Titus, in my opinion, is one of the most fascinating works by William Shakespeare I've read so far. I certaintly recomend this book to any of those with a wild imagination and an open mind. These lines can take you to a place you never could have imagined before,but now you will.

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