To Every Thing a Season: Shibe Park and Urban Philadelphia, 1909-1976

Overview

"An exceptionally valuable contribution to the new genre of serious and adult baseball history. . . . As for those who say how important is a ball park really, I'd say this. In a way the Coliseum was a ball park. Look at how much it tells us about Imperial Rome."—Roger Kahn

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$24.61
BN.com price
(Save 17%)$29.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $1.99   
  • New (7) from $13.98   
  • Used (13) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

"An exceptionally valuable contribution to the new genre of serious and adult baseball history. . . . As for those who say how important is a ball park really, I'd say this. In a way the Coliseum was a ball park. Look at how much it tells us about Imperial Rome."—Roger Kahn

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Philadelphia Inquirer
[Kuklick] writes with authority, perspective, and compassion. . . .
Washington Post - George Robinson
One of the most important baseball books in recent years.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 1991 SABR-MacMillan Book Award, Society for American Baseball Research

Winner of the 1991 Casey Award, Spitball: The Literary Baseball Magazine

"One of the most important baseball books in recent years."—George Robinson, Washington Post

"[Kuklick] shows what a ballpark can mean to a neighborhood: 'Shibe Park was a place where uncommon deeds gave people a sense of commonality. In this, its special beauty, the game at Shibe Park rose above the flaws of its businessmen, its players, and its fans.' "—Sports Illustrated

"[Kuklick] writes with authority, perspective, and compassion. . . ."—Philadelphia Inquirer

Washington Post
One of the most important baseball books in recent years.
— George Robinson
Sports Illustrated
[Kuklick] shows what a ballpark can mean to a neighborhood: 'Shibe Park was a place where uncommon deeds gave people a sense of commonality. In this, its special beauty, the game at Shibe Park rose above the flaws of its businessmen, its players, and its fans.'
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Steegmuller relates the story of the deep friendship between the 18th-century intellectuals Madame d'Epinay and the Abbe Galiani, who met in the Paris of Voltaire and Diderot, and corresponded for years thereafter. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Kuklick (humanities, Univ. of Pennsylvania, author of American Policy: The Division of Germany, LJ 6/1/72) has not written a standard baseball history. Rather, he has integrated two teams, a ballpark, and an urban area into a story that appeals at once to the baseball fan, historian, and sociologist. He examines the neighborhood in North Philadelphia that was the site of Shibe Park (later Connie Mack Stadium), home of the Philadelphia Athletics from 1909 until their departure for Kansas City in 1954, and the Phillies until their move to Veterans Stadium. Each chapter is packed with details concerning the eras, players, and impact of the stadium on its neighborhood. Of particular interest from a historical point of view are the depictions of changes in modes of transportation and the availability and types of jobs for residents. Sadly, most of these changes appear to have been for the worse. The A's are now in Oakland, the Phillies at Veterans Stadium, and Connie Mack has been dead since 1955, but the image of Shibe Park and its neighborhood lives on. Highly recommended for most sports collections as well as for social history collections.-- William O. Schee ren, Hempfield Area Senior H.S. Lib., Greensburg, Pa.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691021041
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 1/11/1993
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 1,112,665
  • Product dimensions: 6.09 (w) x 9.24 (h) x 0.67 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2003

    Baseball and Business Merge at Shibe Park

    I just finished this book while on my cruise vacation, and it was a fine way to spend time at sea. This book is a must for serious Philadelphia baseball fans (which I am not), but also for those interested in the history of old ballparks (which I am) as well as the changes in 20th century urban life. The history of Shibe Park (Connie Mack Stadium) is well documented, but with substantial undercurrents of detail about the residents of Philadelphia, the politics of the city, and the managements of both the A's and Phillies. As Philadelphia prepares to open a new baseball park in 2004, this book splendidly recalls an era now past....the marvelous (but, sadly, too few) photographs enliven the text as we read of Shibe Park's rise, history, and collapse. Nice, light, summer baseball reading. Will someone be writing a similar book about the Vet sometime soon?

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)