To Every Thing a Season: Shibe Park and Urban Philadelphia, 1909-1976 by Bruce Kuklick, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
To Every Thing a Season: Shibe Park and Urban Philadelphia, 1909-1976

To Every Thing a Season: Shibe Park and Urban Philadelphia, 1909-1976

by Bruce Kuklick
     
 

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Shibe Park was demolished in 1976, and today its site is surrounded by the devastation of North Philadelphia. Kuklick, however, vividly evokes the feelings people had about the home of the Philadelphia Athletics and later the Phillies.

Overview

Shibe Park was demolished in 1976, and today its site is surrounded by the devastation of North Philadelphia. Kuklick, however, vividly evokes the feelings people had about the home of the Philadelphia Athletics and later the Phillies.

Editorial Reviews

Philadelphia Inquirer
[Kuklick] writes with authority, perspective, and compassion. . . .
Washington Post - George Robinson
One of the most important baseball books in recent years.
From the Publisher
Winner of the 1991 SABR-MacMillan Book Award, Society for American Baseball Research

Winner of the 1991 Casey Award, Spitball: The Literary Baseball Magazine

"One of the most important baseball books in recent years."—George Robinson, Washington Post

"[Kuklick] shows what a ballpark can mean to a neighborhood: 'Shibe Park was a place where uncommon deeds gave people a sense of commonality. In this, its special beauty, the game at Shibe Park rose above the flaws of its businessmen, its players, and its fans.' "Sports Illustrated

"[Kuklick] writes with authority, perspective, and compassion."Philadelphia Inquirer

Washington Post
One of the most important baseball books in recent years.
— George Robinson
Sports Illustrated
[Kuklick] shows what a ballpark can mean to a neighborhood: 'Shibe Park was a place where uncommon deeds gave people a sense of commonality. In this, its special beauty, the game at Shibe Park rose above the flaws of its businessmen, its players, and its fans.'
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Steegmuller relates the story of the deep friendship between the 18th-century intellectuals Madame d'Epinay and the Abbe Galiani, who met in the Paris of Voltaire and Diderot, and corresponded for years thereafter. (Apr.)
Library Journal
Kuklick (humanities, Univ. of Pennsylvania, author of American Policy: The Division of Germany, LJ 6/1/72) has not written a standard baseball history. Rather, he has integrated two teams, a ballpark, and an urban area into a story that appeals at once to the baseball fan, historian, and sociologist. He examines the neighborhood in North Philadelphia that was the site of Shibe Park (later Connie Mack Stadium), home of the Philadelphia Athletics from 1909 until their departure for Kansas City in 1954, and the Phillies until their move to Veterans Stadium. Each chapter is packed with details concerning the eras, players, and impact of the stadium on its neighborhood. Of particular interest from a historical point of view are the depictions of changes in modes of transportation and the availability and types of jobs for residents. Sadly, most of these changes appear to have been for the worse. The A's are now in Oakland, the Phillies at Veterans Stadium, and Connie Mack has been dead since 1955, but the image of Shibe Park and its neighborhood lives on. Highly recommended for most sports collections as well as for social history collections.-- William O. Schee ren, Hempfield Area Senior H.S. Lib., Greensburg, Pa.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780691021041
Publisher:
Princeton University Press
Publication date:
01/11/1993
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
272
Sales rank:
1,251,984
Product dimensions:
6.09(w) x 9.24(h) x 0.67(d)

What People are saying about this

Roger Kahn
An exceptionally valuable contribution to the new genre of serious and adult baseball history. . . . As for those who say how important is a ball park really, I'd say this. In a way the Coliseum was a ball park. Look at how much it tells us about Imperial Rome.

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