To Marry an English Lord: Or How Anglomania Really Got Started by Gail MacColl, Carol McD. Wallace |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
To Marry an English Lord: Or How Anglomania Really Got Started

To Marry an English Lord: Or How Anglomania Really Got Started

by Gail MacColl, Carol McD. Wallace
     
 

AMERICAN HEIRESSES TAKE ON THE PEERAGE

In 1895, nine American girls, including a Vanderbilt (railroads), LaRoche (pharmaceuticals), Rogers (oil) and Whitney (New York trolleys), married peers of the British realmoXamong them, a duke, an earl, three barons and a knight. It was the peak year of a social phenomenon that began in the Gilded Age after the Civil War

Overview


AMERICAN HEIRESSES TAKE ON THE PEERAGE

In 1895, nine American girls, including a Vanderbilt (railroads), LaRoche (pharmaceuticals), Rogers (oil) and Whitney (New York trolleys), married peers of the British realmoXamong them, a duke, an earl, three barons and a knight. It was the peak year of a social phenomenon that began in the Gilded Age after the Civil War and handed down the legacy of Anglomania, Preppies, the Jet Set, even Winston Churchill and Princess Diana, offspring of such Anglo-American alliances. In all, more than 100 American heiresses invaded Britannia and swapped dollars for titles. TO MARRY AN ENGLISH LORD is their story.

The book thato_s comme il faut

Tales of wealth and marriage, sex and snobbery, featuring:

Ñh Stuffy Old New York and Mrs. Astoro_s oß400or

Ñh Pushy Mamas, Wall Street Fathers & The Quest for Class

Ñh Edward, The Prince of Wales Who Loved Rich American Girls

Ñh The Marriage Contract, Keeping House in a Castle, Doing Your Wifely Duty: The Heir & the Spare

Ñh Complete with: the Parties, the Clothes, the Scandals, the Love Affairs, and 100-Year-Old Gossip Thato_s Still Scorching

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This delightful account of how American heiresses in the post-Civil War era packed up their trunks and went husband-hunting in England demonstrates that our national infatuation with British aristocracy is nothing new. The young women had good looks and big bucks; the often debt-ridden Brits had titles, castles and a society that was ``more stimulating and more permissive, more leisurely and more sophisticated than Old New York.'' MacColl and Wallace (editor of and contributor to, respectively, The Preppy Handbook ) chronicle the lives of the rich and famous on both sides of the ocean, dishing up spicy gossip, pithy social commentary (by 1910, ``Society in America became more sure of itself. Social climbers no longer needed titles for legitimacy'') and obscure historical tidbits (because they were almost never allowed to sit in Queen Victoria's presence, her ladies-in-waiting ``habitually bought shoes a size too big since their feet swelled so badly''). The book also includes witty profiles of leading American ladies and their British lords, piquant period photographs and handy tips on proper etiquette, such as ``Any man who reverses changes the direction in which he's spinning his partner during a waltz is a cad.'' BOMC alternate. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Large fortunes were made in post-Civil War America. Young heiresses, cold-shouldered by an entrenched aristocracy that scorned new money, looked across the sea to find husbands among titled young Englishmen who were long on status but very short of cash. Nancy Astor and Jennie Churchill are the most famous of more than 100 of these trans-Atlantic brides. This light-hearted bit of social history is lavishly illustrated and bedecked with sidebars and boxes of charts, lively quotes, and other supplementary material. A full register of these enterprising young ladies and a ``Walking Tour'' are included. Not only fun, but a definitive round-up of the players. Recommended.-- Nancy C. Cridland, Indiana Univ. Libs., Bloomington

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780894809392
Publisher:
Workman Publishing Company, Inc.
Publication date:
01/09/1989
Pages:
416
Product dimensions:
6.02(w) x 9.02(h) x 0.81(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“Marvelous and entertaining.” — Julian Fellowes, creator of DOWNTON ABBEY

Meet the Author


Gail MacColl Jarrett is a writer who lives in England.

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