To Serve My Country, to Serve My Race: The Story of the Only African-American WACS Stationed Overseas During World War II by Brenda L. Moore, Jennifer Wriggins |, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
To Serve My Country, to Serve My Race: The Story of the Only African-American WACS Stationed Overseas During World War II

To Serve My Country, to Serve My Race: The Story of the Only African-American WACS Stationed Overseas During World War II

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by Brenda L. Moore, Jennifer Wriggins
     
 

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To Serve My Country, To serve My Race is the story of the historic 6888th, the first United States Women's Army Corps until composed of African American women to serve overseas. While African Americans men and white women were invited, if belatedly, to serve their country abroad, African American women were excluded from overseas duty throughout most World War II.

Overview

To Serve My Country, To serve My Race is the story of the historic 6888th, the first United States Women's Army Corps until composed of African American women to serve overseas. While African Americans men and white women were invited, if belatedly, to serve their country abroad, African American women were excluded from overseas duty throughout most World War II.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
The deployment of the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, the only group of black WACs (members of the Women's Army Corps) to serve overseas in WWII, marked a significant turning point in the status of racial minorities and women in the armed forces. Drawing on the testimony of former members of the unit, Moore recounts its formation, training and service in the European theater of operations in 1945-46, highlighting the discrimination the women faced because of their race and gender. Many, as the author shows, campaigned actively to change the race-biased policies of the WACs through boycott and direct protest. She examines what civilian life was like for many of them before they entered the military and the various personal, political and economic reasons that impelled them to join up, then discusses how their military experience influenced their postwar life: ``Although they did not gain materially, these women almost invariably said that they benefitted spiritually for having served.'' Her study is an important contribution to African American and gender studies. Moore, who served six years in the Army, is assistant professor of sociology at SUNY-Buffalo. Illustrations. (Jan.)
Library Journal
Moore, who has served in the U.S. Army, has written a gender and race study about the status of African American women in the army during World War II. Her academic studies led her to note that African American women have been ignored in major studies about World War II, and in this book she tries to remedy the omission. Moore focuses on the 6888th Batallion, which had the only group of African American Women Army Corps (WAC) who served overseas during the war. Of the 855 women who served, Moore interviewed 51 for this book. Appendixes reproduce the questionnaire and give the names of those interviewed. Chapter notes, a bibliography, and photos are also included. Moore makes frequent comparisons to other studies about military veterans. Her scholarly work will serve as a solid contribution about African American women in World War II.-Dorothy Lilly, Grosse Pointe North H.S. Lib., Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich.
From the Publisher
"Drawing on the testimony of former members of the unit, Moore recounts its formation, training and service in the European theater of operations in 1945-46, highlighting the discrimination women faced because of their race and gender. . . . An important contribution to African American and gender studies . . . "

-Publishers Weekly

"A rich, comprehensive study."

-Philadelphia New Observer

"Moore has made an incredible discovery. This book will be a major contribution to military studies, African American studies, and women's studies."

-Booklist

"This work fills the void that has been created by scholars of military institutions. It represents an original analysis of the experience of women of African descent who served their country in the Women's Army Corps during World War II. Her robust analysis of their feelings, motivations and experience within the military provides the reader with a moving tale of accomplishments of black women during a critical point in the history of the country. Professor Moore's separation of race and gender effects in the book is excellent, and brings out the fact that women of African descent must be seen in their own historical light if one is to understand their unique history. This book makes a significant contribution to military sociology, gender studies, American studies, and race and ethnic relations."

-John Sibley Butler,The University of Texas at Austin, author of Entrepreneurship and Self-Help Among Black Americans: A Reconsideration of Race and Economics

”A fascinating account of black women in the armed forces in World War II. We are indebted to Brenda Moore for recording this story while these women are still with us. Moore gives powerful new insights for African American studies, gender studies, and military history.”

-Charles Moskos,Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780814755877
Publisher:
New York University Press
Publication date:
08/01/1997
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
743,805
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.80(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher

"Moore has made an incredible discovery. This book will be a major contribution to military studies, African American studies, and women's studies."

-Booklist,

"Drawing on the testimony of former members of the unit, Moore recounts its formation, training and service in the European theater of operations in 1945-46, highlighting the discrimination women faced because of their race and gender. . . . An important contribution to African American and gender studies . . . "

-Publishers Weekly,

"A rich, comprehensive study."

-Philadelphia New Observer,

"This work fills the void that has been created by scholars of military institutions. It represents an original analysis of the experience of women of African descent who served their country in the Women's Army Corps during World War II. Her robust analysis of their feelings, motivations and experience within the military provides the reader with a moving tale of accomplishments of black women during a critical point in the history of the country. Professor Moore's separation of race and gender effects in the book is excellent, and brings out the fact that women of African descent must be seen in their own historical light if one is to understand their unique history. This book makes a significant contribution to military sociology, gender studies, American studies, and race and ethnic relations."

-John Sibley Butler,The University of Texas at Austin, author of Entrepreneurship and Self-Help Among Black Americans: A Reconsideration of Race and Economics

"A fascinating account of black women in the armed forces in World War II. We are indebted to Brenda Moore for recording this story while these women are still with us. Moore gives powerful new insights for African American studies, gender studies, and military history."

-Charles Moskos,Professor of Sociology, Northwestern University

Meet the Author

Brenda L. Moore is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the State University of New York, Buffalo. A Presidential Appointee to the American Battle Monuments Commission, she served on active duty for six years in the U.S. Army in the United States and Europe.

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