To The Ends Of The Earth / Edition 1

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Overview


In this engagingly written book Thomas Bonner unveils the dramatic story of women's long struggle to become physicians. Focusing both on international comparisons and on the personal histories of many of the pioneers, their determination and dedication, their setbacks and successes, he shows how European and American women gradually broke through the wall of resistance to women in medicine. In pre-Civil War America, in Tsarist Russia, in Victorian England, special schools of medicine for women were widely established as early as 1850 as a kind of way-station on the road to medical coeducation. Only in Switzerland and France, at first, could women study medicine in classes with men. As a result, hundreds and then thousands of women from Russia, Eastern Europe, England, and the United States enrolled in Swiss or Parisian universities to gain the first-class education that was denied them at home. Coming almost literally from "the ends of the earth," they formed the largest migration of professional women in history.
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Editorial Reviews

Science

A clearly written and comprehensive historical account of the evolving national, legal, and educational structures bearing on women's medical education and licensing.
— Robert A. Nye

Nature

A fresh examination of the different strands of [women's] long and intense struggle for medical training.
— Margaret W. Rossiter

New England Journal of Medicine

An essential reference for anyone studying the historical, social, economic, and psychological currents that affected many countries' ability to make full use of the talent of half the potential candidates for a medical education. It is also a tribute to the women in many countries who persisted, against extraordinary odds, in pursuing a profession that they found irresistibly challenging and gratifying.
— Eleanor G. Shore, M.D.

Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education

To the Ends of the Earth is an absorbing chronicle of women's struggle to gain entrance to the medical schools of the industrializing nations of Europe, Imperial Russia and North America from the mid-nineteenth century up to the end of the first World War. Bonner has made excellent use of varied sources to reveal the internal social, political, and economic currents which helped or hindered women's quest for quality medical education...Engagingly written...[T]he breadth of the book is an important addition to scholarship on women in medicine. It enhances our understanding of the role of the state in women's personal struggle for medical education.
— Anne Taylor Kirschmann

Science - Robert A. Nye
A clearly written and comprehensive historical account of the evolving national, legal, and educational structures bearing on women's medical education and licensing.
Nature - Margaret W. Rossiter
A fresh examination of the different strands of [women's] long and intense struggle for medical training.
New England Journal of Medicine - Eleanor G. Shore
An essential reference for anyone studying the historical, social, economic, and psychological currents that affected many countries' ability to make full use of the talent of half the potential candidates for a medical education. It is also a tribute to the women in many countries who persisted, against extraordinary odds, in pursuing a profession that they found irresistibly challenging and gratifying.
Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education - Anne Taylor Kirschmann
To the Ends of the Earth is an absorbing chronicle of women's struggle to gain entrance to the medical schools of the industrializing nations of Europe, Imperial Russia and North America from the mid-nineteenth century up to the end of the first World War. Bonner has made excellent use of varied sources to reveal the internal social, political, and economic currents which helped or hindered women's quest for quality medical education...Engagingly written...[T]he breadth of the book is an important addition to scholarship on women in medicine. It enhances our understanding of the role of the state in women's personal struggle for medical education.
Science
A clearly written and comprehensive historical account of the evolving national, legal, and educational structures bearing on women's medical education and licensing.
— Robert A. Nye
Nature
A fresh examination of the different strands of [women's] long and intense struggle for medical training.
— Margaret W. Rossiter
New England Journal of Medicine
An essential reference for anyone studying the historical, social, economic, and psychological currents that affected many countries' ability to make full use of the talent of half the potential candidates for a medical education. It is also a tribute to the women in many countries who persisted, against extraordinary odds, in pursuing a profession that they found irresistibly challenging and gratifying.
— Eleanor G. Shore, M.D.
Paedagogica Historica: International Journal of the History of Education
To the Ends of the Earth is an absorbing chronicle of women's struggle to gain entrance to the medical schools of the industrializing nations of Europe, Imperial Russia and North America from the mid-nineteenth century up to the end of the first World War. Bonner has made excellent use of varied sources to reveal the internal social, political, and economic currents which helped or hindered women's quest for quality medical education...Engagingly written...[T]he breadth of the book is an important addition to scholarship on women in medicine. It enhances our understanding of the role of the state in women's personal struggle for medical education.
— Anne Taylor Kirschmann
Booknews
Focusing both on international comparisons and on the personal histories of many of the pioneers, Bonner shows how European and American women gradually broke through the wall of resistance to women in medicine--many choosing initially between inferior women-only institutions at home (e.g. pre-Civil War America, Tsarist Russia, Victorian England) and integrated medical schools in Switzerland and France. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780674893047
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press
  • Publication date: 1/1/1992
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 266
  • Product dimensions: 0.56 (w) x 6.14 (h) x 9.21 (d)

Meet the Author

Thomas Neville Bonner was Distinguished Professor of History at Wayne State University.
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Table of Contents

Prologue: 1871

1. Women and the Study of Medicine

Women in an Economic Squeeze

Why Women Should Not Be Doctors

The American Context

Medical Colleges for Women

Segregation and Its Effects

The American Achievement

2. Zurich and Paris

Rendezvous in Zurich

Nadezhda Suslova: The Russian Pioneer

The Legend of Frances Elizabeth Morgan

First American: Susan Dimock

The Russian Crisis

The Opening of Paris

A New Beginning

3. The Great Migration

After the Pioneers

The Opening of Bern

Geneva and Lausanne

The Fight for the Internship in France

Floodtide

The End of an Era

4. Women, Medicine, and Revolution in Russia

Higher Education for Women

The Case of Varvara Kashevarova

Medical Courses for Women

New Setbacks

Triumph and Chaos

5. Imperial Germany

Verboten: The Ban on Women in Medicine

The Bitter Debate

The Turn of the Tide

Before the War

6. The Fight for Coeducation in Britain

The Battle of Edinburgh

Why Women Should Not Study with Men

A Women's School in London

New Openings for Women

7. America: Triumph and Paradox

Coeducation and Separatism

Coeducation Slowly Advances

The Demise of the Women's Schools

Success and Disappointment

Epilogue: Since 1914

Notes

Bibliography

Index

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