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To the Last Man I Slept with and All the Jerks Just like Him
     

To the Last Man I Slept with and All the Jerks Just like Him

5.0 8
by Gwendolyn Zepeda
 

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Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. With dark, knife-in-the ribs humor and poignant glimpses of youth and early adulthood, Gwendolyn Zepeda's first book is the literati's version of television variety shows of the 1970s. Chock full of sharp observations in a narrative that jumps from personal essay to a parody of romance novels to inventive fiction, this collection

Overview

Poetry. Latino/Latina Studies. With dark, knife-in-the ribs humor and poignant glimpses of youth and early adulthood, Gwendolyn Zepeda's first book is the literati's version of television variety shows of the 1970s. Chock full of sharp observations in a narrative that jumps from personal essay to a parody of romance novels to inventive fiction, this collection spans a wide range of themes: the complications of being a "half-white child of hippies born in Houston in 1971" raised in a largely Mexican barrio..."how to Be a Trailer Trash Housefie"...and a midnight dance with a giant cockroach. Weaving her exploration of family life, love, the struggle for economic stability, and the search for a personal creative space, Zepeda's brash voice cuts at society's stereotypes, at once critiquing those around her and herself.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781558854062
Publisher:
Arte Publico Press
Publication date:
01/28/2004
Pages:
184
Sales rank:
929,775
Product dimensions:
6.12(w) x 7.96(h) x 0.56(d)

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To the Last Man I Slept with and All the Jerks Just like Him 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
It will make you laugh at life. It will make you mad at life. It will make you self reflect. Excellent collection of short stories.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Ms. Zepeda is definitely brave giving her book a title that is going to push some buttons and a cover that will surely get many comments, if not eye-rolls. But take the time to see what's inside and you won't be disappointed. I wasn't. As a matter of fact, it is up there with a - f e w - other books that I just couldn't put down. It's hard to describe, but I can say this, it definitely gives us a new feminist and feminine perspective of life in the barrio. Congratulations, Ms. Zepeda for rocking our world!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is definitely different than Sandra Cisnero's. A purely different kind of Latina writer, who's brazen stream of consciousness breaks all the rules. Her vivid imagination about families, friends, and herself living in the barrio gives credence that there is a story in all of us. She is bold, truthful, and at times not kind to our 'Cookie Cut Out' Society and that's why this is worth your while to read it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is an excellent collection of short stories. The title and cover may fool you into thinking this book is a rant against men. Far from it. It is about evolving as a woman, a 'half-white' latina, a writer, a singer, a moralist. Zepeda wears many hats as she weaves stories about characters facing challenges that they don't always overcome. There is youthful exuberance in her parodies of action heroes, chick lit, and TV soaps. She pays literary homage to the magical realism of Borges and Kafka. Warning: don't come here looking for happy endings. Zepeda tells you life is hard. Finally, leave your mundane sensibilities behind; if the thought of chewing on a womans soiled panties disturbs you, move on. But you will have missed out on something really good.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Great book!! I enjoyed reading the humor and the life experiences!!! Worth every penny!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
Gwendolyn Zepeda has put together a collection of some of her best comedy and short stories in To the Last Man I Slept with and All the Jerks Just Like Him. ¿Crazy Tony¿, ¿Eddie¿ and ¿Tina¿ read like their own novel and the pieces are arranged so that we come back and meet familiar characters. At the end of the book, we are pleasantly surprised when she takes the musings of ¿Ants¿ and completes the scenario in ¿Love and Humanoids.¿ We hope the men are the same in ¿The Bus Driver¿ and ¿Alexandra and Me.¿ In the first two sections of the book, Ms. Zepeda writes down things we only thought went through our minds. She shares a comical interpretation of some bad situations and makes us take a hard look at the voices in our heads. I feel very brave when I read the four versions of the book¿s title knowing that there is an ¿Aunt Jeanie¿, an ¿Aunt Rosie¿ and an Aunt Sylvia (¿A Big-Breasted Woman is a Hard Thing to Be¿). Gwendolyn gives us strong, female characters that finally stop listening to people calling them `slut.¿ This book sees women when they realize that they are who they make themselves in this fictional world and not the lies that other people have to believe about these women to feel superior. ¿I just realized who the real hero is here¿ I¿m the rock star. I¿m the brave warrior. I¿m the clever girl who grows up to win fame and fortune. I am the queen. And I always have been.¿ The last two sections let us dance and laugh with these women. ¿I¿m going to go out into the world and be a hero. If you want to, you can watch.¿ Common themes of karaoke and fantasy teach us that survival and brevity require a good sense of humor. ¿My Lord Alpha Male¿ and ¿The Gai Jin Perspective¿ allow us to keep our fetishes only if we can laugh about how ridiculous they are. To the Last man I Slept with is a complete work of fiction. It meets us in the ¿mallway¿ and drops us off ¿in the middle of a scorched cornfield.¿ You will visit a carnival and live in a sky-blue trailer, but you will never feel exploited. Through these characters, Gwendolyn Zepeda teaches us all to embrace ourselves because if we don¿t, Xotcd won¿t meet his quota.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed when Gwen wrote about her life as a child & I feel for her, when she express her personal anger toward men. Oh, I love the title & the cover.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Funny and poignant at the same time, To the Last Man I Slept With, is a fantastic mind-twisting ride through what it means to define yourself in the face of adversity. The stories in the book are absolutely amazing. Written in a style that is a little bit 'Clockwork Orange' and a little bit 'Catcher in the Rye', the book follows several women through their journey of becoming. At times I laughed hysterically; at times I felt like crying. It's compelling, it's fun, and it's a really good read. Definitely read this book to enjoy the funny stories, but don't miss the underlying theme of self-discovery in this modern age.