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To the Lighthouse [NOOK Book]

Overview

To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. A landmark novel of high modernism, the text, centering on the Ramsay family and their visits to the Isle of Skye in Scotland between 1910 and 1920, skillfully manipulates temporality and psychological exploration.

To the Lighthouse follows and extends the tradition of modernist novelists like Marcel Proust and James Joyce, where the plot is secondary to philosophical introspection, ...
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To the Lighthouse

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Overview

To the Lighthouse (5 May 1927) is a novel by Virginia Woolf. A landmark novel of high modernism, the text, centering on the Ramsay family and their visits to the Isle of Skye in Scotland between 1910 and 1920, skillfully manipulates temporality and psychological exploration.

To the Lighthouse follows and extends the tradition of modernist novelists like Marcel Proust and James Joyce, where the plot is secondary to philosophical introspection, and the prose can be winding and hard to follow. The novel includes little dialogue and almost no action; most of it is written as thoughts and observations. The novel recalls the power of childhood emotions and highlights the impermanence of adult relationships. One of the book's several themes is the ubiquity of transience.
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940016201214
  • Publisher: Wishland Publishing
  • Publication date: 2/21/2013
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • File size: 2 MB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 56 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(22)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(11)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 56 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2003

    Excellent book!

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Though it was somewhat difficult to get through, it was amazingly written. I read the book 6 months ago, and I can still vividly remember scenes from the book. I especially liked the one and only scene in the book with Mr. and Mrs. Ramsey alone. I still remember it after all these months.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 26, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Frustrating

    I read about two books per month, usually choosing a variety of historical fiction and modern classics. I admit that I could not finish reading To the Lighthouse. Although pieces of the novel were very poetic, I found the style very frustrating to read. The narrative is mainly the mixed up thoughts of the characters and their thoughts jump wildly so that you don't know if the character is speaking aloud or not. There are pages of confusing thoughts involving a single few seconds of action. I would not recommend this book to the average modern reader.

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2004

    Simply Brilliant

    Ms. Woolf has crafted some of the most wondeful, idiosyncratic and mystifying sentences in the English language, and, in the process, has created a portrait of a family that is unerring in its truth. Yes, the book is difficult, but the rewards are great, as the changes wrought by war, death, marriage, age and life itself are slowly revealed. This is my favorite book because it exemplifies all that literature can be and more, and I'm only 17. If I can reap the benefits of such a literary wonder, you can too.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 2, 2001

    A True Master of Imagery and Emotion

    This book was my first encounter with Virginia Woolf's work and it will certainly not be the last. From the moment I opened the book, I was engrossed with Virginia's ability to create an ebb and flow of human emotion mirror the actual presence of the ocean. As you read the innermost thought of the characters you connect with them, seeing small clips of characteristics that describe yourself. This book is a minor taste of the stream-of-consciousness movement that Woolf was a part of, but is not as difficult to follow as the works of Joyce and others.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 19, 2012

    Beautiful Book-A must read!

    This book is one of the most beautiful stories that I have ever read. Through a series of events that take place basically in two days, Virginia Woolf shows us that the human condition is a complex, yet wonderful state. By illustrating not only what people do, but also illustrating the thoughts and intentions behind the actions, Woolf humanizes her characters in a profound way. While reading this book, I found myself feeling with the characters; laughing when they laughed, mourning when they mourned, a truly remarkable experience. I believe that anyone that reads this book will be able to commiserate with the people in it.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2005

    Thought provoking but confusing

    i read this for ap english 3 class...it's a pretty good book with lots of symbols and thoughts on life in general, however this book is fairly confusing and involves a lot of thinking on the reader's part...i'm doing a research paper on this book right now and learnign more than i did from the book...i would recommend thsi book if you're into 'discovering' the meaning of life or something boring like that.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2004

    What?!?!

    I chose Virginia Woolf¿s To the Light House after seeing the movie ¿The Hours,¿ based on the life of Virginia Woolf. Woolf who is considered to be one of the first modern writers suffered from various psychological problems. Her mental illnesses is why I consider her to be of a different culture then myself. Throughout the novel To the Light House I believe Woolf used the characters to exemplify her own twisted feelings on the world. The protagonist per say in the story is Mrs. Ramsey who can be characterized as portraying the typical caring supporter and mother figure. However it unveiled in the story that Mr. Ramsey cannot function without the constant support and confidence that Mrs. Ramsey gives him. Another key point of Woolf¿s culture being exemplified through Mrs. Ramsey is the fact that Mrs. Ramsey will not tell her husband that she loves him. Studies have shown that Woolf indeed was a bi- sexual and had trouble with the male sex. Another main character Lily Briscoe, who is a worrying painter, also embodies Virginia Woolf¿s psychological problems. Briscoe continuously worries about her painting being good enough just as Woolf never felt that her writing were good enough. Mr. Ramsey and James both possess the same mental problems that Virginia Woolf went through. They along with Woolf consistently felt alone although people usually surrounded them. They tried to mask their feeling of insecurity but eventually they would burst, such as when James was at the dinner table and when Mr. Ramsey tells James that is inevitable they will not be able to go to the Lighthouse. As one of Virginia Woolf¿s establishing novels, To the Light House is written in as a stream of consciousness and contains many symbolisms. But it is clearly evident throughout the book that the author has very deep and serious psychological issues. Critical Analysis What did I think of the book? Well I can now see why Virginia Woolf committed suicide because if I had to read my books like that I would too. On a serious note I felt that the stream of consciousness was hard to follow at first. The Dinner party was the only truly clarifying moment in the entire book. The symbolisms that I came to find out later in the cliff notes were not evident in the text and without any prior knowledge of Virginia Woolf the book can turn into a mystery. I do not believe I would recommend this book to my worst enemy. I mean when i read for fun I want it to be fun!

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 4, 2012

    Hatefully boring

    Maybe it was the style of her time but there was nothing in these characters that made it worth suffering through. These people needed a good zombie attack to liven things up.

    1 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2006

    confussing

    i read this book for my senior project and had to write a paper...it was the toughest paper i had to write so far...its so confussing!!!!...i dont recommand this book at all...

    1 out of 13 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 4, 2000

    0 plot= bad story

    to the lighthouse was convoluted confusing and utterly pointless. there was no plot. None of the characters seemed real. And whats with all that Q-R stuff w/ Mr. Ramsay? If I hadn't had to read this for school I would never have wasted the money

    1 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 30, 2014

    Whenever I dive into a classic that (by our Twitter-age) is boun

    Whenever I dive into a classic that (by our Twitter-age) is bound to be 'wordy,' I prep myself. This is a difficult book to get through for a modern reader, but well worth it. You can't try to make the writing fit your own expectations. You have to just accept the language as it is, and pretty soon you'll find the 'classics groove' as I call it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2009

    Extremely Confusing

    I have to read this book for a Literature assignment, and it is one of the most confusing books I've ever read. I can't get through it. Woolf's sentences are extremely long, some expanding (literally) a page or so. I do not recommend this book unless you want a challenge.

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2004

    Beautiful

    This may be, in face, one of the best books I've ever read. Virginia Woolfs perfectly sculpted sentences and interesting characters make this book a must read for anyone. Makes you think about your life in a way no other book can.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2002

    Brilliant!

    What turns many away from this novel is the way Woolf uses space. The second part of the novel ('Time Passes') manages to compress the events of ten years into thirty pages while the entire first part ('The Window') is the longest section of the novel, at over 100 pages, and covers just ONE day, ending with the dinner party. To the people who hated it, I suggest they first read 'A Room of One's Own' to get a better idea of what Woolf aims to achieve in her art. Lily's experience mirrors Woolf's in a number of significant ways. It's pretty easy to 'dis' what you don't understand. But it may reflect your own understanding (or lack thereof) than the intrinsic qualities of the work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2000

    In The Eyes of The Beholder

    'To The Lighthouse' by Virginia Woolf is novel split into three sections. Each section is dedicated to a different time period in the lives of the Ramsay family as they vacation at their summer home in Scotland. The novel is simply a compilation of anecdotes narrating the interplay of the characters and the events in their lives from 1910 to 1920. <P> Woolf's style makes 'To The Lighthouse' a complex novel. It is an unfamiliar style and yet very familiar, for Woolf writes using stream of consciousness. Stream of consciousness means Woolf writes the thoughts of the characters exactly as they think them. What makes this style so difficult to read is mostly the lack of punctuation. Since humans do not consciously put punctuation into their thoughts as they would if they were writing, the thoughts of the Ramsay's and other characters tend to be in run-on sentences. There is very little dialog, for all of the conversations that occur are described in the thoughts of one of the characters involved in the conversation. Since each character has a unique point of view, this style emphasizes the fact that everything is in the eye of the beholder. Woolf's style makes 'To the Lighthouse' a slow, but intriguing, read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2000

    All men (and women) should read Virginia Woolf.

    Many men define Woolf by her searing critiques of the patriarchy & the power-monger male and subsequently shy away from her brilliant work. Don't. Even if you are a Richard Dalloway of sorts & a little implicit criticism sounds daunting in the evening reading hours. Woolf's stunning aesthetic and authorial gift is too great to just pass up. She is wonderfully ambiguous, smart, & perceptive. To the Lighthouse is not only a darned good three part novel, but also a telling relic of the birth of modernism & the post-war consciousness. Read it, especially if you are a mature & interested reader & person. This is, in my opinion, her best novel.

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    Posted February 11, 2012

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    Posted April 25, 2010

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2012

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2009

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