Today Is Monday In Louisiana

Today Is Monday In Louisiana

by Deborah Kadair, Johnette Downing
     
 

Gold/Honors Award Winner
2007 National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Children's Products

"Kadair's homespun collages . . . prove to be a tasty medium . . . Youngsters may well be inspired to put together their own art projects celebrating their favorite dishes." --Publishers Weekly

"A pleasing addition to Louisiana lore and a fun, light note for a unit

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Overview

Gold/Honors Award Winner
2007 National Parenting Publications Awards (NAPPA) Children's Products

"Kadair's homespun collages . . . prove to be a tasty medium . . . Youngsters may well be inspired to put together their own art projects celebrating their favorite dishes." --Publishers Weekly

"A pleasing addition to Louisiana lore and a fun, light note for a unit on the state."
--School Library Journal

Red beans, po' boys, gumbo, jambalaya, catfish, crawfish, and beignets are foods most Louisianians have grown up eating, but for nonnatives and visitors, these new words and tastes are a discovery upon their arrival in New Orleans, Lafayette, Shreveport, or Baton Rouge. In Today Is Monday in Louisiana, singer/songwriter Johnette Downing adapts a longtime Louisiana song for everyone's enrichment. Now, kids all over the country can "come and eat it up!"

Told with delicious repetition, this chronological culinary journey takes readers through the days of the week, as one Louisiana dish after another is served up. Monday, it's red beans, Tuesday it's po boys, Wednesday it's gumbo, and on it goes through Sunday, when New Orleans' favorite breakfast treat, beignets, are enjoyed with a warm cup of café au lait. The glossary at the end of the book explains the origins and ingredients of the dishes and includes even more new words like "okra," "sassafras," and "lagniappe."A recipe for red beans and rice is included, encouraging readers to begin their week the Louisiana way!

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Downing's fans may recognize this cumulative text as the lyrics to a longtime Louisiana favorite song she adapted for her 1998 kids' album, From the Gumbo Pot. Even without the music, the words still have plenty of lip-smacking appeal as they match signature Creole and Cajun dishes to the days of the week. "Today is Monday/ Monday red beans," begins the text, adding the verses' refrain: "All you lucky children, come and/ eat it up. Come and eat it up!" By the time the end of the week rolls around, readers also will have been urged to try everything from po' boys (Tuesday) to beignets (Sunday), always followed by the refrain. Kadair's (Grandma's Gumbo) cut-paper and photo collages alternate close-ups of the dishes with scenes of a dining room that welcomes an ever-growing number of guests. Her homespun collages may be made from cloth and paper (and even rice), but they prove to be a tasty medium for conveying the mouthwatering flavors. Youngsters may well be inspired to put together their own art projects celebrating their favorite dishes. In keeping with the spirit of the culture it celebrates, the book also includes a lagniappe: a description of each dish cited, and a recipe for red beans and rice. Ages 5-8. (Nov.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-A variation of a Louisiana song with a twist-each day a new food is served as a faceless assortment of children come one by one to the table. Eventually, there are seven, with seven different dishes in front of them, a cat and dog underneath the table waiting for scraps, and a grandmotherly figure overseeing everything. Back matter includes a description of each dish and a recipe for Monday's red beans and rice. The simplicity of Kadair's bold, bright collages fits the text perfectly. The oblong format of this offering, with the words on the left-hand page and the illustration opposite, works well as the table gets pretty crowded at the end. A pleasing addition to Louisiana lore and a fun, light note for a unit on the state.-Judith Constantinides, formerly at East Baton Rouge Parish Main Library, LA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
In this adaptation of a popular song, internationally-acclaimed children's musician Downing introduces a signature Louisiana food for each day of the week, from red beans on Monday to beignets on Sunday. After presenting each new dish, the book repeats preceding days' dishes, providing children the perfect opportunity to participate in the story as they are prompted to recall information from previous pages. A catchy refrain follows each day's meal: "All you lucky children come and eat it up. Come and eat it up!" Kadair's trademark collages illustrate close-ups of each new food while a table full of children with plates in front of them occupies the pages opposite the chorus. Downing's rhythmic, repetitive text will appeal to children, as will Kadair's addition of a new child to the table for each new food. Unfortunately, the collage technique often results in unappetizing pictures of the foods introduced here-the catfish, for example, appears to be covered in hair, and the beignets are literally squares of cardboard-and thus, the book is not likely to inspire children to expand their culinary, or cultural, horizons. (glossary, recipe) (Picture book. 3-7)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781589804067
Publisher:
Pelican Publishing Company, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/28/2006
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
263,610
Product dimensions:
11.10(w) x 8.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 Months to 5 Years

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