Today's Moral Issues

Overview

This anthology of 88 readings explores the most pressing ethical issues of our time. In addition to providing readings on contemporary issues, the book lends historical perspective to current moral issues through its unique inclusion of classic selections by philosophers such as Mill, Kant, Locke, and Rousseau.
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1998 Trade paperback 3rd ed. New. Trade paperback (US). Glued binding. 694 p. Audience: General/trade. As new in no dust jacket trade paperback. Clean, tight copy with no ... writing. APPEARS NEVER TO HAVE BEEN READ! ! NICE CONDITION FOR A USED BOOK. Read more Show Less

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Overview

This anthology of 88 readings explores the most pressing ethical issues of our time. In addition to providing readings on contemporary issues, the book lends historical perspective to current moral issues through its unique inclusion of classic selections by philosophers such as Mill, Kant, Locke, and Rousseau.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
An introductory text for courses on contemporary moral problems. The book ties 74 classic and contemporary readings together on four themes: liberty, first principles, rights and responsibilities, and justice. The classic texts include writers such as Aristotle, Marx, Burke, Kant, Rousseau, and Locke. In each section they are followed by writings on specific modern day issues including drug legalization, pornography, the environment, health care, sexual behavior, abortion, euthanasia, capital punishment, world hunger, welfare, and affirmative action. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780767400114
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Companies, The
  • Publication date: 7/28/1998
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 694
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Daniel Bonevac is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Texas at Austin. Educated at Haverford College (BA) and the University of Pittsburgh (MA, PhD), he is author of five books and editor or co-editor of three others. His first book, Reduction in the Abstract Sciences, won the Johnsonian Prize from the editors of The Journal of Philosophy. He has published articles on ethics, metaphysics, philosophical logic, and the philosophy of language. He has been teaching courses on contemporary moral issues for thirty years.
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Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction: Moral Arguments and Moral Relativism

Relativism

Arguments

Evaluating Arguments: Three Arguments for Cultural Relativism

Arguments against Cultural Relativism

Making Moral Arguments

Exceptions to Moral Principles

PART I. FIRST PRINCIPLES

Classic Texts

Aristotle, from Nicomachean Ethics

David Hume, from A Treatise of Human Nature

Immanuel Kant, from Grounding of the Metaphysics of Morals

Jeremy Bentham, from Principles of Morals and Legislation

John Stuart Mill, from Utilitarianism

John Rawls, from A Theory of Justice

Philippa Foot, from Virtues and Vices

The Environment

Paul R. Ehrlich and Anne H. Ehrlich, “Risks, Costs, and Benefits”

Bill Devall and George Sessions, from Deep Ecology

William Baxter, from People or Penguins

Animals

International League of the Rights of Animals, “Universal Declaration of the Rights of Animals”

Peter Singer, from Animal Liberation

Tom Regan, from “The Case for Animal Rights”

Carl Cohen, “The Case for the Use of Animals in Biomedical Research”

David Carruthers, from The Animals Issue

Sexual Behavior

Bertrand Russell, “Our Sexual Ethics”

Thomas Mappes, “Sexual Morality and the Concept of Using Another Person”

Sidney Callahan, “Abortion and the Sexual Agenda”

Roger Scruton, from Sexual Desire

PART II. LIBERTY

Classic Texts

Aristotle, from Nicomachean Ethics

John Milton, from Areopagitica

Edmund Burke, from Reflections on the Revolution in France

John Stuart Mill, from On Liberty

DrugLegalization

Milton Friedman, “An Open Letter to Bill Bennett”

William J. Bennett, “A Response to Milton Friedman”

Ethan A. Nadelmann, “The Case for Legalization”

James Q. Wilson, “Against the Legalization of Drugs”

Douglas Husak, from Drugs and Rights

Pornography

Reno v. ACLU

Catharine MacKinnon, “Pornography, Civil Rights, and Speech”

Attorney General’s Commission on Pornography, “The Question of Harm”

Wendy McElroy, from Sexual Correctness

Nadine Strossen, from Defending Pornography

Thomas E. Weber, “Does Anything Go?”

Offensive Speech and Behavior

Justice Antonin Scalia, majority opinion in R. A. V. v. St. Paul

Stanley Fish, from There’s No Such Thing as Free Speech, and It’s a Good Thing ,Too”

Jonathan Rauch, “Kindly Inquisitors: The New Attacks on Free Thought”

Privacy

Justice William Douglas, majority opinion in Griswold v. Connecticut

Justices Black and Stewart, dissenting opinion in Griswold v. Connecticut

Justice Byron White, majority opinion in Bowers v. Hardwick

Justice Harry Blackmun, dissenting opinion in Bowers v. Hardwick

Richard Posner, from The Economics of Justice

Jeffrey Reiman, “Driving to the Panopticon”

PART III. RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES

Classic Texts

Thomas Hobbes, from Leviathan

John Locke, from Second Treatise of Government

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, from On the Social Contract

Edmund Burke, from Reflections on the Revolution in France

John Stuart Mill, from Utilitarianism

Abortion

Justice Harry Blackmun, majority opinion in Roe v. Wade

John T. Noonan, Jr., “An Almost Absolute Value in History”

Judith Jarvis Thomson, “A Defense of Abortion”

Mary Anne Warren, “On the Moral and Legal Status of Abortion”

Jane English, “Abortion and the Concept of a Person”

Don Marquis, “Why Abortion Is Immoral”

Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide

Matter of Quinlan

Cruzan v. Harmon

Chief Justice William Rehnquist, majority opinion in Cruzan v. Missouri Department of Health

Justice John Paul Stevens, dissenting opinion in Cruzan v. Missouri Department of Health

J. Gay-Williams, “The Wrongfulness of Euthanasia”

James Rachels, “The Morality of Euthanasia”

Ronald Dworkin, Thomas Nagel, Robert Nozick, John Rawls, Thomas Scanlon, and Judith Jarvis Thomson, “The Brief of the Amici Curiae”

Chief Justice William Rehnquist, majority opinion in Washington v. Glucksberg

Chief Justice William Rehnquist, majority opinion in Vacco v. Quill

Capital Punishment

Justice William Brennan, concurring opinion in Furman v. Georgia

Justice Thurgood Marshall, concurring opinion in Furman v. Georgia

Justices Stewart, Powell, and Stevens, majority opinion in Gregg v. Georgia

Hugo Adam Bedau, “The Case against the Death Penalty”

Ernest van den Haag, from The Death Penalty: A Debate

PART IV. JUSTICE

Classic Texts

Aristotle, from Nicomachean Ethics and Politics

John Locke, from Second Treatise of Government

Jean-Jacques Rousseau, from Discourse on the Origin of

Inequality and On the Social Contract

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, from Estranged Labour, Manifesto of the Communist Party, and Critique of the Gotha Program

John Rawls, from A Theory of Justice

Robert Nozick, from Anarchy, State, and Utopia

Welfare

Kai Nielsen, “Egalitarian Justice: Equality as a Goal and Equality as a Right”

John Hospers, “What Libertarianism Is”

Ronald Dworkin, “Liberalism”

Charles Murray, from Losing Ground: American Social Policy, 1950–1980

Marvin Olasky, from The Tragedy of American Compassion

Michael Tanner and Stephen Moore, “Why Welfare Pays”

Affirmative Action

Justice Lewis Powell, majority opinion in Regents of the University of California v. Bakke

Hopwood v. Texas

Antonin Scalia, “The Disease as a Cure”

Bernard R. Boxill, “Blacks and Social Justice”

Thomas Sowell, “‘Affirmative Action’: A Worldwide Disaster”

World Hunger

Garrett Hardin, “The Case against Helping the Poor”

Peter Singer, from Practical Ethics

Bryan T. Johnson, Kim R. Holmes, and Melanie Kirkpatrick, “Freedom’s Steady March”
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