Todd Lammle's CCNA IOS Commands Survival Guide by Todd Lammle, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Todd Lammle's CCNA IOS Commands Survival Guide

Todd Lammle's CCNA IOS Commands Survival Guide

3.5 2
by Todd Lammle
     
 

To become a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA), you must learn the hundreds of IOS commands used by Cisco routers and switches. This handy reference from Cisco networking authority Todd Lammle is just what you need to master those commands. From a thorough introduction to Cisco's basic operating system to making the transition to IPv6, Todd Lammle walks you

Overview

To become a Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA), you must learn the hundreds of IOS commands used by Cisco routers and switches. This handy reference from Cisco networking authority Todd Lammle is just what you need to master those commands. From a thorough introduction to Cisco's basic operating system to making the transition to IPv6, Todd Lammle walks you through hundreds of commands with short, to-the-point explanations and plenty of figures and real-world examples.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Should be on every network administrator's bookshelf." (Publishing News, Friday 19th October 2007)
If you want to pass your CCNA the first time -- and truly be effective as a Cisco network professional -- you can't treat IOS as an afterthought or necessary evil. You need to dive in, get comfortable, really master Cisco's command line interface. That's where this book comes in. This is no mere command reference: Todd Lammle organizes it by task, not command -- helping you quickly get answers and solve problems. Moreover, he's written it with the CCNA in mind: These are techniques you'll need to ace your certification exam.

Lammle takes you from the basics (booting a router, entering setup and router configuration modes, configuring hostnames and passwords) all the way to sophisticated IP routing, VLANs, and security. Using hundreds of commands and output examples, he helps you work with EIGRP and OSPF; configure Layer-2 switching and STP; set up static and dynamic NAT; and securely configure Cisco wireless technologies. There's even a full chapter on IPv6, which is on the CCNA exam even if it's not in your network yet.

If you're still looking for alternatives to the command line, Lammle thoroughly introduces Security Device Manager (SDM), Cisco's free web-based tool for device management and troubleshooting. Whether you're a command-line maven or not, you'll find something useful in SDM -- probably, quite a lot.

Lammle, of course, is singularly well-qualified to write a book like this. His CCNA prep guides have been translated into 12 languages; his company trains thousands of Cisco certification candidates every year. Lammle and his colleagues know more about CCNA certification than anyone -- and few people know more about IOS, either. Bill Camarda, from the December 2007 Read Only

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780470175606
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
12/05/2007
Pages:
312
Product dimensions:
7.30(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Should be on every network administrator's bookshelf." (Publishing News, Friday 19th October 2007)

Meet the Author

Todd Lammle, CCSI, CCNA/CCNP/CCSP, MCSE, CEH/CHFI, FCC RF Licensed, is the authority on Cisco Certification internetworking. He is a world-renowned author, speaker, trainer, and consultant. Todd has over 25 years of experience working with LANs, WANs, and large Wireless networks. He is president of GlobalNet Training, Inc, a network integration and training firm based in Dallas. You can reach Todd through his forum at www.lammle.com.

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Todd Lammle's CCNA IOS Commands Survival Guide 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought the book per recommendation that it would help me with my CCNA studies. After reading the Odom book and using other study materials, I don't feel I got my money's worth out of this book in particular. I used it to look up a couple commands, but in the end, it wasn't worth it for my studies. This would likely be more useful for day-to-day use at work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago