Tollins 2: Dynamite Tales

Tollins 2: Dynamite Tales

by Conn Iggulden, Lizzy Duncan
     
 

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We return to Chorleywood, home of the Tollins, tiny creatures with wings who aren't fairies and are about as fragile as a brick wall. In three thrilling stories, they will face the trials of theater, radio technology, and . . . armed invasion. Luckily, there's only medium exposure to danger . . . such as when Sparkler catches his hand in a pair of pliers.

In

Overview

We return to Chorleywood, home of the Tollins, tiny creatures with wings who aren't fairies and are about as fragile as a brick wall. In three thrilling stories, they will face the trials of theater, radio technology, and . . . armed invasion. Luckily, there's only medium exposure to danger . . . such as when Sparkler catches his hand in a pair of pliers.

In "Romeo and Beryl," Sparkler discovers an old human book and decides to put on a play of a story that is filled with great love and even more shouting. At the same time, a new craze sweeps Chorleywood as dragonfly racing literally takes off.

In "Radio," the Dark Tollins of Dorset invade in force, with a housecat leading the charge. Sparkler, Wing, and Grunion must find a way to save themselves, and possibly the cat as well.

Finally, in "Bones," the Tollins leave Chorleywood on a mission of mercy. The homes of the Dark Tollins are about to be blown up by humans! We will dis­cover the importance of hot tea and toast in such desperate times. As well as jam, obviously. Once again, it's Sparkler and his band of Tollins to the rescue!

Editorial Reviews

VOYA - Kevin Beach
A sequel to the author's Tollins: Explosive Tales (HarperCollins, 2009), the author of The Dangerous Book For Boys (William Morrow, 2007) offers new stories about the exploits of these small, fairy-like creatures who reside in the British Isles in the 1920s. The Tollins live underground, are about the size of dragonflies (upon which they sometimes fly), and are curious about the lives and inventions of humans. The Tollins discover books in a nearby library and proceed to copy Shakespeare's plays. Soon the entire hive becomes involved in putting on Romeo and Juliet, only to be interrupted by an attack from the rival Dark Tollins, who reside in a neighboring shire. They befuddle the bumbling enemy with fireworks and radio transmissions but soon befriend their would-be attackers. Ultimately, the Tollins visit the Dark Tollins's hive and discover that human archaeologists are unknowingly about to dynamite the area of their tunnels seeking ancient bones. The Tollins work together to save the hive. These stories are quite British in flavor and have Roald Dahl's cutting wit to them. The accompanying illustrations by Lizzy Duncan are both charming and colorful, adding much to the stories. The various characters are developed enough to predict additional sequels. The audience for these books is unclear. While a fourth grader might enjoy the simple story lines and drawings, a fourteen-year-old might relate to the elements of fantasy and humor, though the illustrations and plots are juvenile, albeit entertaining. Recommend this to owners of the first book. Reviewer: Kevin Beach
Children's Literature - Paula Rohrlick
Tollins are little people with wings, but don't mistake them for insipid fairies: they are a bit like Terry Pratchett's fierce and funny clan of Wee Free Men, with a dash of Mary Norton's Borrowers thrown in. They live in Great Britain, in underground tunnels, and in this volume the year is 1924. In this sequel to Tollins: Explosive Tales for Children, we are treated to three new adventures featuring these intrepid creatures. In the first, "Romeo and Beryl," Sparkler, an inventor, shifts his attention from dragonfly racing to exploring human books. He comes upon Romeo and Juliet and sets out to stage a Tollins version. In the second tale, "Radio," Sparkler has "borrowed" a fascinating human machine, just as a Dark Tollin from Dorset is discovered. This Tollin is suspected of being an enemy spy, though he insists he has come to warn of an impending invasion, led by a Dark Tollin riding a very annoyed cat. In the last story, "Bones," the Dorset branch of Tollins ask for help when an archeologist plans to destroy the cliff they inhabit in order to get at dinosaur bones. Charmingly detailed, full-color illustrations add to the fun and sly humor of the adventures, which will appeal to a wide age range. Reviewer: Paula Rohrlick

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062043085
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/17/2012
Series:
Tollins , #2
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
192
File size:
81 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Despite finding time to write historical novels and The Dangerous Book for Boys, Conn Iggulden is in some ways better known as a trainer of Tollins. His Tollin troupe, Small and Mighty, are famous in Tasmania, where they often play to packed houses. Tragically, he lost his two best-known performers earlier this year. "The thing about transporting Tollins in shoe boxes," he says, "the really important thing, is to remember to put the airholes in."

Lizzy Duncan, with her trademark blue glasses, was a founding member of the Tollins in Art program, where inner-city schoolchildren are taken to the countryside by bus and encouraged to paint and observe Tollins in their natural habitats. Tollins: Explosive Tales for Children was her first illustrated book.

Lizzy's abstract paintings of Tollins are much sought after whenever they appear at Sotheby's auction house, and she is very active in promoting Tollin rights and registering them as a protected wetland species—or as a dryland species, if the weather's been good.

Conn and Lizzy's first book together, Tollins: Explosive Tales for Children, was published in 2009 to great critical acclaim—and has ensured that no one will ever mistake a Tollin for a fairy again.

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