Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading [NOOK Book]

Overview

Caught up in grief after the death of her sister, Nina Sankovitch decided to stop running and start reading. For once in her life she would put all other obligations on hold and devote herself to reading a book a day: one year of magical reading in which she found joy, healing, and wisdom.

With grace and deep insight, Sankovitch weaves together poignant family memories with the unforgettable lives of the characters she reads about. She finds a lesson in each book, ultimately ...

See more details below
Tolstoy and the Purple Chair: My Year of Magical Reading

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.99
BN.com price

Overview

Caught up in grief after the death of her sister, Nina Sankovitch decided to stop running and start reading. For once in her life she would put all other obligations on hold and devote herself to reading a book a day: one year of magical reading in which she found joy, healing, and wisdom.

With grace and deep insight, Sankovitch weaves together poignant family memories with the unforgettable lives of the characters she reads about. She finds a lesson in each book, ultimately realizing the ability of a good story to console, inspire, and open our lives to new places and experiences. A moving story of recovery, Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is also a resonant reminder of the all-encompassing power and delight of reading.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Like many other people, Nina Sankovitch responded to the death of a loved one (in this case, an older sister) by redoubling their own activities. For her, those frenetic diversions provided no sense of escape. Finally, after three years, she shifted emotional gears and began reading; grappling with one book a day and starting a blog about her newly revived passion. Tolstoy and the Purple Chair recounts that year of magical thinking, immersing us in its gentle revelations and surprising lessons. Now in trade paperback and NOOK Book. Editor's recommendation.

Publishers Weekly
When Sankovitch lost her older sister to cancer, she was determined to "live her life double" in order to make up for her family's painful loss. But after three years spent at a frenetic pace, Sankovitch decided to slow down and rediscover the pleasure of books in order to reconnect with the memory of her sister. Despite the day-to-day responsibilities of raising four sons—and the holidays, vacations, and sudden illnesses that accompany a large family—Sankovitch vowed to read one book a day for an entire year and blog about it. In this entertaining bibliophile's dream, Sankovitch (who launched ReadAllDay.org and was profiled in the New York Times) found that her "year of magical reading" was "not a way to rid myself of sorrow but a way to absorb it." As well as being an homage to her sister and their family of readers, Sankovitch's memoir speaks to the power that books can have over our daily lives. Sankovitch champions the act of reading not as an indulgence but as a necessity, and will make the perfect gift from one bookworm to another. (June)
BookPage
“In Tolstoy and the Purple Chair, her affectionate and inspiring paean to the power of books and reading, Sankovitch gracefully acknowledges that her year of reading was an escape into the healing sanctuary of books, where she learned how to move beyond recuperation to living.”
Booklist
“A beautifully fluid, reflective, and astute memoir that gracefully combines affecting family history with expert testimony about how books open our minds to ‘the complexity and entirety of the human experience.’ Sankovitch’s reading list in all its dazzling variety is top-notch.”
Devourer of Books
“Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is an absolutely lovely account of the healing power of literature.”
Ventura County Star
“[A] brilliant and heartwarming book.”
Boston Globe
“This graceful memoir describes a true love affair with books.”
Buffalo News
“Sankovitch’s account works well because she uses her reading list to jump off into topics that are tangential, yet intriguing and often important.”
PsychCentral.com
“[Tolstoy and the Purple Chair] offers timeless wisdom, is uplifting and has a powerful message.”
The Dartmouth
“An original and touching…account of one woman’s lifelong affinity for books and her attempt to channel that affinity to deal with her grief after her sister dies. Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is an understated but moving story about the effects of a ‘year of magical reading.’”
Connecticut Post
“[Tolstoy and the Purple Chair] digs deep into that near-mystical connection between a reader and an author—that startling feeling that you are channeling someone you have never met...A gripping and inspiring book.”
American Way
“Her deeply moving memoir artfully intertwines her immigrant family’s history with the universal themes of hope, resilience, and memory. Tolstoy and the Purple Chair celebrates not only the healing power of literature but its ability to connect us to the best of ourselves — and each other.”
Christian Science Monitor
“Sankovitch’s memoir stands as a tribute to the power of books to enrich our daily lives.”
Shelf Awareness (starred review)
“A beautifully paced look at how mindfulness can affect the psyche.”
Los Angeles Times
“The beauty of her project lies in seeing how books intertwine with daily life, how very much they affect our moods, interactions, and, especially important for Sankovitch, how we recover and process our memories….She makes reading seem accessible, relaxing, inspiring, fun.”
The Book Bully
“Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is a must-read for anyone who adores books. It is also a primer on the healing power of taking time off to grieve by immersing oneself in a revered activity.”
The Christian Century
“She is adept at stitching together musings about the books she is reading with memory and narrative from her own life.”
Smoky Mountain News
“What is best in Tolstoy and the Purple Chair, however, is not the author’s literary criticism, but the way in which she blends her accounts of her reading with the story of her family and with broader human concerns.”
Shelf Awareness
"A beautifully paced look at how mindfulness can affect the psyche."
The Christian Century
“She is adept at stitching together musings about the books she is reading with memory and narrative from her own life.”
Smoky Mountain News
“What is best in Tolstoy and the Purple Chair, however, is not the author’s literary criticism, but the way in which she blends her accounts of her reading with the story of her family and with broader human concerns.”
The Oprah Magazine O
“Anyone who has ever sought refuge in literature will identify with Tolstoy and the Purple Chair.”
Thrity Umrigar
“Nina Sankovitch has crafted a dazzling memoir that reminds us of the most primal function of literature—to heal, to nurture and to connect us to our truest selves.”
Julie Klam
“Tolstoy and the Purple Chair will transport you to a time before texts and tweets. Through the stories of her own family, Nina Sankovitch shows how books have the power to refresh, renew, and even heal us. I loved this memoir.”
S. J. Bolton
“Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is original, uplifting and very moving: a unique celebration of life, love and literature.”
Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni
“Tolstoy and the Purple Chair masterfully weaves beloved and sometimes surprising books into central events in the writer’s life. There is much to learn from this moving book. Sankovitch writes with intelligence and honesty, leading us to respond in a similar manner.”
Library Journal
"Pleasure on a schedule" is how Sankovitch describes the plan detailed in her memoir. A married, stay-at-home mom with four sons, she decided to create calm in her life by sitting down, sitting still, and reading an entire book each day and completing a journal with her reaction to each book. Sankovitch knew she could read 70 pages an hour; she selected books no more than one inch thick. Other self-imposed rules dictated that she not read more than one book by any author. Nor could she read any book she had previously read. The book's title refers to Sankovitch's favorite author and the old chair she sat in to read each day. Beginning the project on her 46th birthday, Sankovitch entwines her comments about her reading selections with family stories including her parents surviving World War II in Europe, her upbringing in a tight-knit family of five who loved books and reading, and finally, her sister's death from bile-duct cancer. Sankovitch continues to write about her reading on her web site ReadAllDay.org as a way to encourage adults to read each day. VERDICT Sankovitch's frequent comments about unwashed laundry and the repetitive stories of baking Christmas cookies with her step-daughter may try the reader, but these are minor when considering her accomplishment and the appeal of her memoir.—Joyce Sparrow, Kenneth City, FL
Kirkus Reviews

This celebration of the richness of reading will reward anyone who loves to read.

This is a far better book than one might expect from the categories into which it seems to fall. It initially seems like a book in which the author commits to reading the encyclopedia, the Bible or some other exhaustive work, only in this case the challenge is to read, and review, a book per day for a full year. Yet the impetus fits this into a separate category of mourning memoirs, for it was the death of the author's sister that inspired her regimen. Ultimately, the results transcend categories, comparisons and matters of marketing, because what Sankovitch has accomplished in her first book is not only to celebrate the transformational, even healing, powers of reading, but to give the reader a feeling of reading those books as well, through the eyes of an astute reader. Her choices are eclectic, international, unpredictable (even by her), the main mandate being that each is manageable enough to be read in a day. Avoiding the tedium of a diary, the author deals with the books thematically in chapters that focus on love, death, family, even the joys of reading, as she skillfully interweaves a memoir of growing up in a bookish immigrant family and developing a complicated, loving relationship with her oldest sister. After cancer claimed her sister at the age of 46, Sankovitch plunged into relentless activity—"I was scared of living a life not worth the living." But hyperactivity failed to ease her mourning, so on her own 46th birthday, she dedicated herself to reading, not as a simple escape, but "as an escape back to life."

Intelligent, insightful and eloquent, Sankovitch takes the leader on the literary journey, demonstrating how after "trying to anaesthetize myself from what I'd lost...I'd finally stopped running away." As a bonus, even the well-read reader will be inspired to explore some of the books from this magical year.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062092168
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 6/7/2011
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 242,738
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Nina Sankovitch

Nina Sankovitch launched ReadAllDay.org in 2008, and at the end of her year of reading, she was profiled in the New York Times. She continues to review books on ReadAllDay.org and for the Huffington Post. She lives in Connecticut with her husband and four sons.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Prologue: On the Cliff 1

1 Crossing the Bridge 5

2 Return to the Bookmobile 18

3 Such Beauty in the World 32

4 In Search of Books and Time 46

5 Rearranging the Rhythms 53

6 The Only Balm to Sorrow 62

7 Looking for the Star 75

8 Finding Another Chance 88

9 To Welcome the Interloper 99

10 Hearing Words I'd Missed Before 108

11 Where Warmth Is Found 119

12 The Expansion of Experience 131

13 Bound to the World 140

14 Sex by the Book 149

15 The Man in My Dreams 157

16 Offering a Better View 164

17 Fireflies Dancing Across the Lawn 177

18 The Answers That Mysteries Provide 186

19 Discovering Purpose in Kindness 193

20 Coming off Loulou's Motorcycle 204

21 Tolstoy in My Purple Chair 212

Acknowledgments 223

Complete List of Books Read from October 28, 2008, to October 28, 2009 225

Permissions 237

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 26 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(10)

4 Star

(10)

3 Star

(3)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 13, 2011

    A remarkable first book.

    Don't be deterred by the descriptions of Tolstoy and the Purple Chair as a book about grieving. It is, indeed, Nina Sankovich's memoir of coming to terms with her sister's untimely death through reading. But it is much more a book about hope and the ever-amazing power our nature to return us from dark places. It's about getting to a point where remembering a life is no longer just excrutiating but joyful, the way it should be. I think it's also about learning to live with both the grief and the joy and understanding that they go together. As someone who has filled many empty places in my life with books, I automatically understood Sankovich's turning to reading for solace and understanding and maybe just as way to get through each painful day early on. But I believe that anyone who has experienced loss will enjoy the book, whether they follow the same path as the author or not. In fact, few of us will do exactly as Sankovich does and read 365 books in a year. It's her example of finding her own way through a tough time that is the lesson.

    7 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 13, 2011

    Reading from the Heart: A Book-lover's Journey from Grief to Joy

    Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is a memoir of hope, and also a highly readable and fascinating book. Lifelong book lover Nina Sankovitch read a book every day for a year -- and wrote insightful reviews of each. Her project was her personally crafted therapy to overcome the devastating grief that engulfed her when her sister Anne Marie died suddenly of cancer.
    While most people would look to non-fiction self-help books about death/dying in their search for answers and ways to cope and overcome their grief, Sankovitch took the more difficult path; she read great fiction, novels, short stories -- some intense, as well as some more distracting books -- in search of her own release from the guilt and pain that trapped her in the aftermath of her sister's death. Rather than provide clear answers, the books prompted Sankovitch to delve deeper into herself, as well as into the characters; they helped her constructively deal with her own personal grief and ultimately enabled her to find the will to move joyfully forward once again.
    Book lovers will adore this book, but even for a casual reader, Tolstoy and the Purple Chair will resonate because the story of Sankovitch's grief and how she came to terms with it is something universally relatable. The simple gift of a great book's lessons is the most precious to Sankovitch, and sharing what she has learned during her yearlong project is her gift to fellow readers.
    Masterfully woven into her daily life of laundry and kids' birthdays, reflections of time spent with her intellectual and fellow-book-loving sister, recollections of childhood memories and parents' histories, come the books' meaningful lessons she's uncovered during her year of reading. Quotes at the beginning of each chapter from some of the books highlight meaningful themes in her reading and provide a context for the chapter contents. Sankovitch loves to read, but more than that, she must read; it is an addiction that is positive, one that she finds motivating, meaningful, and in the case of her project, freeing. Sharing her experiences via Tolstoy and the Purple Chair is, for her, a gift to other readers so they too may glean from her experiences and be inspired to read and gain understanding and knowledge from great books and their characters.
    Sankovitch tells the story not only of how she managed to read and review a book a day (dirtier house, lots of late nights) but also tells her family story as the youngest of three daughters of immigrant parents growing up in suburban Chicago; as a college foreign exchange student; as an accomplished professional in New York City; and as a wife and mother of 4 boys living on the east coast. With tales and reflections that span from her father's own tragic legacy in war-torn Europe to her sons' birthdays in their Connecticut home, Sankovitch exposes her readers to the emotions and thoughts she experienced during her reading project. Yes, there is sadness here, but there is also learning, growing, humor, love, and joyful emergence from the depths of sadness and guilty grief as Sankovitch tries to come to terms with the fact that she has been spared and granted a wonderful life while her sister was abruptly denied her own full life in a painful and unfair death.
    Tolstoy and the Purple Chair highlights ideas from various books Sankovitch read during her yearlong project and relates them to her emotions and struggles while she groped her way back to her previous

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 19, 2011

    an interesting account of reading, reflecting, and healing

    "Tolstoy and the purple chair" is Nina Sankovitch's memoir of the year she spent dedicating to reading-reading and reviewing a book a day, using reading as a healing process to recover from losing her sister.

    I found the book to be part memoir (the author recalls her childhood, her relationship with her sister, and her currently bustling household) and part exploration into how books connect with real life (the author includes various brief descriptions of the books she read, as well as her reaction to them).

    The end of the book also has a lengthy list of every book the author read during her reading year. I thought is subject matter was interesting. Throughout the book, Sankovitch emotionally reflects on her current and past life, while choosing books based on their similarities to her own experiences, original storylines-including many mysteries, as well as taking recommendations made by friends and strangers.

    While the prospect of reading a book a day is a venture that is time-consuming, Sankovitch confesses that she looked upon the time as a long vacation from the turmoil of her own life, and encourages readers to do the same. Overall, an interesting concept and a worthy account.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 13, 2011

    BEST SUMMER READ!!!!!!!!!!! FALL IN LOVE WITH NINA AND HER BOOKS AND ESCAPE WITH HER !!!!!!!!!!

    An amazing first memoir of this author's personal journey of learning to live again after the tremendous loss of a beloved sister by opening a new book, everyday for a year, and capturing its essence in her daily reviews. Starting with a promise and a pledge begins the Holy Grail of this bright and colorful 365 days of magical reading. You curl up with Nina in her purple chair as she explores the layers of her own fascinating history while entwining it with her well chosen novels; ("only books I want to read") as she seeks her truth and the human experience with the curiosity of a cat for deeper meanings and delightful reads she shares on her web-site everyday. As Nina's calendar of days and books grow you will start cheering her on as you see her love of literature slowly change her unadulterated sadness, as a caterpillar to butterfly, her days of oneness become numbered and her love and belief in the human experience voiced through the written word brings forth a true and lasting imprint on us all. This book is one you will hold close. It is an encyclopedia of beautiful novels Nina reviewed that you will want to go back to again and again. It is a true story of a free-spirited woman that wasn't afraid to find her own voice and with a scent of rosemary show how love will always survive. Lovely, sincere and true, enjoy this feast with Nina of good reads and turning your own page on the excitement of the written word.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2013

    you must check this out -- great read

    I recommended it to my book discussion group and the 365 book list at the end of the book lead to many more books to read

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 4, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A wonderful and insightful look at the power of books.

    I had the privilege of having a brief acquaintanceship with Nina in 2009, and I am surprised at how long it took me to pick up this book. But I am grateful I did. TOLSTOY AND THE PURPLE CHAIR is a wonderful and insightful look at the power of books. The author begins her one year journey to read one book a day as a way to cope with her sister's death, but discovers so much more than just a safe haven, and we get to discover that with her. Nina demonstrates several times books' amazing ability to evoke memories and take us back to important and meaningful times in our lives. Throughout the book I too was reminded of a place, a face, a name of something important to me. And, books provide us with a way to meet the future. They also connect us to each other by allowing us to see the world from another point of view, and hopefully gain empathy and respect for one another. I also appreciated that Nina's year of reading did not take place in a vacuum - she was and is a wife, mother of four, sister, daughter, friend and more. I enjoyed learning about her family and seeing how, no matter hectic life got, she still took time for herself. If nothing else, this book is a tribute to one women's quest to find and make time for something that brings her great pleasure, and how those around her helped her make it possible. I don't know which book I will read next, but I feel my reading experiences will be enriched by having read this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 11, 2011

    Get This Book

    Tolstoy And The Purple Chair - My Year Of Magical Reading By Nina Sankovitch was a quick read for me. I have to say I won this book from a place called Goodreads. I was so excited to find this in my mail box. I was hooked from the cover (that purple chair on it I want it). I have to tell you it was not what I expected when I read about the book from Goodreads. The author loses her sister at an early age to cancer that being said, if you have someone that is going through this, not the book for them. I currently have two family members going through different forms of cancer so it was truly hard at moments in the chapters to keep going but I am glad I did. This book is great for quotes. I loved so many of them and went crazy with the highlighter. Nina Sankovitch has a love for books that she shared with her sister. She uses them to help her with the grief from the death of her older sister Anne-Marie. She takes you through the process of how she started this goal, during the goal and lets you get to know not only her but all her family as well. I loved the person that Anne- Marie was and I was touched by her parent's story during the World War II. What I love is that she takes a subject for example love and she describes all the different ways of love she has found though her many characters that dance in and out her life as she reads their stories. She also goes into what books my spice up your love life (see chapter 14). Nina looks at her books as friends, a vacations and an escape. She learns quite a bit and she tells you the books and character that has graced her. She does not cover all of her reads she has a website with all the reviews but lists all 365 books by alphabetical order in the back. I mentioned quotes earlier in the review. There are so many that I can not pick a favorite one, maybe my top five favorites. I will leave with a quote that she wrote in her book by Elizabeth Maguire in her book The Open Door. "Have you ever been heartbroken to finish a book? Has a writer kept whispering in your ear long after the last page is turned? This book inspired me to go to the library and though caution to the wind and try new things. I have not enough time to read a book a day but I was inspired none the less. I give this book 4 stars. Go out and get it you will find so many book inspirations from it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    A perfect rainy day book

    Author Nina Sankovitch has done a marvelous job weaving the books of her year into the stories of her life, demonstrating to readers the power of words and the ability of books to help make people feel connected. Not a quick read, but not necessarily a slow read. Instead, reading "Tolstoy and the Purple Chair" plays out the way most conversations with women do, winding through all kinds of rabbit trails and full of glimpses of Nina's thoughts and personal life.

    It has been interesting to see the connections Nina makes between books and between certain books and her life. The healing she receives while reading in her purple chair is encouraging. In an age of "rush, rush, rush" and books full of self-improvement, filled with advice on how to get more things done in a day, this book was a breath of fresh air, breathed slowly and completely as each book Nina read was treasured and valued.

    Clearly, the nature of the book allowed for little plot or organization, which may not appeal to everyone, but the author certainly has a way of keeping the reader engaged. For lovers of books and fiction, this will be a fun read.

    My blog: Growing Kids Ministry

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 29, 2014

    Great!

    This is one of my favorite books. Great story line and I wasnt very pleasantly suprised that its true; I didnt pick up on that when I bought it. Awesome for book lovers or anyone questioning their purpose after losing someone. Definitely recommend!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    delightful

    Delightful book for book-lovers.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 22, 2013

    Highy Recommeded

    Great story line.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 26, 2011

    Highly recommended

    Anyone who love books...and if you have a NOOK you love books....this is a must-read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2014

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 26 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)