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Tomás Luis de Victoria: Lamentations of Jeremiah
     

Tomás Luis de Victoria: Lamentations of Jeremiah

4.0 1
by Peter Phillips
 
Considered by many scholars to be the greatest of all Spanish composers, Tomas Luis de Victoria was born in 1549. He studied for the priesthood in Rome with the Jesuits and one of his music teachers may have been the great Palestrina. He was ordained and served in various music and clerical positions under papal auspices in Italy before returning to his native Spain

Overview

Considered by many scholars to be the greatest of all Spanish composers, Tomas Luis de Victoria was born in 1549. He studied for the priesthood in Rome with the Jesuits and one of his music teachers may have been the great Palestrina. He was ordained and served in various music and clerical positions under papal auspices in Italy before returning to his native Spain in the late 1500s.

Written to be sung during Holy Week, Victoria's nine Lamentations of Jeremiah contain some of his most intense, mystical, and moving music and rank alongside the Requiem as one of his greatest achievements. They would not have been sung as a set, but rather divided as appropriate among several services. This new recording celebrates several important milestones. Not only is it a rare collection of the complete Lamentations, it also marks the 30th anniversary of the first Gimell recording sessions in March 1980 and is the Tallis Scholarss fiftieth CD. From the Label

Product Details

Release Date:
03/09/2010
Label:
Gimell Uk
UPC:
0755138104327
catalogNumber:
43
Rank:
177128

Related Subjects

Tracks

  1. Lamentation for Maundy Thursday
  2. Lamentations for Good Friday, for chorus

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Tomás Luis de Victoria: Lamentations of Jeremiah 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I'm not a music scholar so I cannot speak to the technical aspects of the compositions.  I can only say that it quiets the spirit within and brings peace.  It can bring clarity to your own meditations, especially during Holy Week