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Tom Sawyer Abroad
     

Tom Sawyer Abroad

3.8 11
by Mark Twain
 

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In the story, Tom, Huck, and Jim set sail to Africa...
WE tried to make some plans, but we couldn't come to no agreement. Me and Jim was for turning around and going back home, but Tom allowed that by the time daylight come, so we could see our way, we would be so far toward England that we might as well go there, and come back in a ship, and have the glory of

Overview

In the story, Tom, Huck, and Jim set sail to Africa...
WE tried to make some plans, but we couldn't come to no agreement. Me and Jim was for turning around and going back home, but Tom allowed that by the time daylight come, so we could see our way, we would be so far toward England that we might as well go there, and come back in a ship, and have the glory of saying we done it.
About midnight the storm quit and the moon come out and lit up the ocean, and we begun to feel comfortable and drowsy; so we stretched out on the lockers and went to sleep, and never woke up again till sun-up. The sea was sparkling like di'monds, and it was nice weather, and pretty soon our things was all dry again.
We went aft to find some breakfast, and the first thing we noticed was that there was a dim light burning in a compass back there under a hood. Then Tom was disturbed. He says:
"You know what that means, easy enough. It means that somebody has got to stay on watch and steer this thing the same as he would a ship, or she'll wander around and go wherever the wind wants her to."
"Well," I says, "what's she been doing since—er—since we had the accident?"
"Wandering," he says, kinder troubled—"wandering, without any doubt. She's in a wind now that's blowing her south of east. We don't know how long that's been going on, either."

Product Details

BN ID:
2940148820123
Publisher:
Hillside Publishing
Publication date:
01/08/2015
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
734 KB

Meet the Author

Samuel Langhorne Clemens (November 30, 1835 — April 21, 1910), better known by the pen name Mark Twain, was an American humorist, satirist, writer, and lecturer. Twain is most noted for his novels Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which has since been called the Great American Novel, and The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. He is also known for his quotations. During his lifetime, Clemens became a friend to presidents, artists, leading industrialists, and European royalty. Clemens enjoyed immense public popularity, and his keen wit and incisive satire earned him praise from both critics and peers. American author William Faulkner called Twain "the father of American literature." Source: Wikipedia
Also available
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885)
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876)
Life On The Mississippi (1883)
Roughing It (1872)
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court (1889)
The $30,000 Bequest and other short stories (2004)
Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc (1896)
Tom Sawyer, Detective (1896)
The War Prayer (1916)
The Jumping Frog (1865)

Brief Biography

Date of Birth:
November 30, 1835
Date of Death:
April 21, 1910
Place of Birth:
Florida, Missouri
Place of Death:
Redding, Connecticut

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Tom Sawyer Abroad 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Twain wrote 'Tom Sawyer Abroad' as he wrote many other works, for financial gain. At approximately 40,000 words it is pale in both length and quality when compared to 'Huckleberry Finn.' Most critics have a problem with Twain's ending of the latter but at least it had one. 'Tom Sawyer Abroad' comes to a grinding halt and leaves one feeling that those old, classic characters have been unfairly and unwillingly exhumed from their noble state for dubious ennoblement in what is basically a humourist's response to Jules Verne. If you liked 'Huckleberry Finn' then that that alone might be a reason to read 'Tom Sawyer Abroad.' Otherwise, it's not worth it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tom Sawyer Abroad is an excellent book! It is yet another book about Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn, and Jim. Written by Mark Twain, this book takes Tom, Huck, and Jim across the world. When Tom, Huck, and Jim go look at a flying machine built by a mad scientist the flying machine suddenly takes off with Tom, Huck, Jim, and the scientist. When the scientist falls overboard, Tom, Huck, and Jim are left to steer the machine! This is when the real adventure begins. They travel across oceans and deserts as they try to get back home. If you enjoy Mark Twain books, then this is a must read!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Ok
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its alright.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love mark twain<3
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GailCooke More than 1 year ago
If you haven't already read Tom Sawyer (could there possibly be anyone who hasn't?) - nonetheless, if you have not, read it first and then, by all means, give a listen to TOM SAWYER ABROAD as narrated by the estimable Grover Gardner. This voice performer's mantel must be groaning under all the awards he has received - AudioFile named him one of the "best Voices of the Century" and a "Golden Voice"; he's won an Audie Award, and was chosen Narrator of the Year by Publishers Weekly. His performance loses none of the folksiness that is so much part and parcel of the Twain stories, and adds frissons of excitement to what is most surely an amazing adventure. Now, once you've become familiar with Tom Sawyer, you know that Tom and Huck thrive on derring-do and are always ready for a challenge. There are quite a few of those in TOM SAWYER ABROAD. They go off to witness the unveiling of an airship only to be held captive by a kooky inventor, Then as luck and Twain would have it the inventor falls overboard leaving the boys trying to control a wayward airship. Soon they're hurtling over the ocean carrying them where and to meet what? This is one more of Twain's masterpieces masterfully read by Grover Gardner. Enjoy! - Gail Cooke
Anonymous More than 1 year ago