×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tom Stoppard: A Life
     

Tom Stoppard: A Life

5.0 1
by Ira Bruce Nadel
 
Tom Stoppard is, arguably, the greatest living English playwright. His work, from the early Jumpers to the film Shakespeare in Love to the current Invention of Love has changed the landscape of drama. Witty, erudite, passionate, abstract, clever, his works are like no one else's. Who is Tom Stoppard-the Czech-born son of Jews who became the singularly English man of

Overview

Tom Stoppard is, arguably, the greatest living English playwright. His work, from the early Jumpers to the film Shakespeare in Love to the current Invention of Love has changed the landscape of drama. Witty, erudite, passionate, abstract, clever, his works are like no one else's. Who is Tom Stoppard-the Czech-born son of Jews who became the singularly English man of letters? In this vibrant, critical portrait, Ira Nadel weaves life and works into a fascinating chronicle of Stoppard's world on English and American stages. Peopled with such characters as Diana Rigg, John Wood, and Billy Crudup, the book untangles Stoppard's genius against the backdrop of Broadway and London's West End.

Author Biography: Ira Nadel is a well-known critic and biographer. The author of the acclaimed Various Positions: A Life of Leonard Cohen, he is a commentator for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and teaches English at the University of British Columbia.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Tom Stoppard is perhaps our greatest living playwright, with over 25 plays produced since 1965 and a cornucopia of honors, including numerous Tony awards, an Oscar for the screenplay of Shakespeare in Love, and a knighthood. Yet Stoppard is and always has been a hard man to pin down, and noted critic and academic Nadel freely admits that "Stoppard in many ways resists biography." Fortunately, that does not keep him from trying and, 600-plus pages later, largely succeeding. Canadian critic/biographer Nadel (Various Positions: A Life of Leonard Cohen) spends considerable time wending his way through the Stoppard chronology, dwelling on the linguistically lush plays like Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, Jumpers, Travesties, The Real Thing, and Arcadia, all of which are uniquely complex, comedic, and intellectual. This thorough and fresh text updates and surpasses Michael Billington's 1987 Stoppard the Playwright. The best and most complete Stoppard biography available, this is a no-brainer acquisition decision for all collections. Barry X. Miller, Austin P.L., TX Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Nadel (English, U. of British Columbia) presents a critical portrait of English playwright Tom Stoppard. Biographical information includes Stoppard's early years in Eastern Europe, his time in India, and his emigration to the UK. The main part of the text is devoted to Stoppard's theatrical career from early plays like to the genesis and development of his newest play, . Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312237783
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
06/28/2002
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
386
Product dimensions:
6.48(w) x 9.54(h) x 1.70(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Tom Stoppard 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Precisely who is the man who gave us such disturbing and erudite plays as 'Rosencrantz and Guildenstern,' 'The Real Thing,' and most recently 'The Coast Of Utopia'? He is arguably the foremost dramatist of our time, but what makes Tom Stoppard tick? We'll not find the answers to these questions in a biography of the playwright by Ira Nadel, although that is not due to lack of research as there are almost 100 pages of references and indices included in this rather weighty tome. Perhaps the best one can do in assessing another human being is to hazard guesses based on observation. There are observations aplenty in this highly readable portrait of an enigmatic genius who, almost singlehandedly, has altered the face of 20th century drama. For Stoppard, born Tomas Straussler in 1937, it has been a far journey from his home in Czechoslovakia to Hollywood, Broadway, and London's West End. Readers take this journey with him, observing Stoddard's evolution into a playwright concerned with morals and politics, noting the ups and downs in his personal life, and seeing his connectedness to his past. Critic/biographer Nadel has done an exemplary job in documenting the life of a contradictory figure. Yet, the question lingers: precisely who is Tom Stoppard?