Tommy [Original Soundtrack]

( 6 )

Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
The Who's album Tommy, released in 1969, was the first rock opera, a story tracing the life of a deaf, dumb, and blind boy who happened to be a pinball wizard. Six years later, the band revisited Tommy primarily written by Pete Townshend with a film adaptation starring Who vocalist Roger Daltrey -- the movie's companion soundtrack album reached the Top Ten and was certified gold. The album features such classic Who tunes as "I'm Free," "Sensation," and "We're Not Going to Take It," plus guest vocals from cast members including Ann-Margaret, Who drummer Keith Moon, Elton John "Pinball Wizard", and Tina Turner "The Acid Queen". This double-CD 2001 reissue of the soundtrack is bolstered by detailed annotations, song ...
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Editorial Reviews

Barnes & Noble
The Who's album Tommy, released in 1969, was the first rock opera, a story tracing the life of a deaf, dumb, and blind boy who happened to be a pinball wizard. Six years later, the band revisited Tommy primarily written by Pete Townshend with a film adaptation starring Who vocalist Roger Daltrey -- the movie's companion soundtrack album reached the Top Ten and was certified gold. The album features such classic Who tunes as "I'm Free," "Sensation," and "We're Not Going to Take It," plus guest vocals from cast members including Ann-Margaret, Who drummer Keith Moon, Elton John "Pinball Wizard", and Tina Turner "The Acid Queen". This double-CD 2001 reissue of the soundtrack is bolstered by detailed annotations, song lyrics, and a full list of the cast, musicians, and chorus that made it happen.
All Music Guide - Stephen Thomas Erlewine
Ken Russell's adaptation of the Who's rock opera Tommy has always been greeted with skepticism, and years after its controversial release, it remains a polarizing experience, due to its sheer garishness no big surprise from Russell and its bevy of guest stars. These two traits, unsurprisingly, spill over to the soundtrack, which is hardly just a re-recording of the Who album -- it's a reinvention of the album, padded with elaborate production twists until it's ready to burst. This, of course, means it's more musical than rock & roll, which sort of fits this project. Elton John's spirited rendition of "Pinball Wizard" the man was at the top of his game in 1975, after all and maybe Tina Turner's "Acid Queen" give this spark.
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Product Details

  • Release Date: 4/17/2001
  • Label: Umvd Labels
  • UPC: 042284112123
  • Catalog Number: 841121
  • Sales rank: 7,004

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Overture from Tommy - The Who (5:01)
  2. 2 Prologue 1945 - Pete Townshend (2:57)
  3. 3 Captain Walker / It's a Boy - Pete Townshend (2:36)
  4. 4 Bernie's Holiday Camp - The Who (3:42)
  5. 5 1951 / What About the Boy? (2:49)
  6. 6 Amazing Journey (3:18)
  7. 7 Christmas (3:38)
  8. 8 Eyesight to the Blind (3:22)
  9. 9 Acid Queen - Tina Turner (3:49)
  10. 10 Do You Think It's Alright? (1) (0:54)
  11. 11 Cousin Kevin (3:07)
  12. 12 Do You Think It's Alright? (2) (0:44)
  13. 13 Fiddle About - The Who (1:40)
  14. 14 Do You Think It's Alright? (3) (0:28)
  15. 15 Sparks - The Who (3:06)
  16. 16 Extra, Extra, Extra (0:34)
  17. 17 Pinball Wizard - Elton John (5:14)
Disc 2
  1. 1 Champagne - The Who (4:42)
  2. 2 There's a Doctor (0:22)
  3. 3 Go to the Mirror - Jack Nicholson (3:57)
  4. 4 Tommy Can You Hear Me? (0:55)
  5. 5 Smash the Mirror (1:23)
  6. 6 I'm Free (2:35)
  7. 7 Mother and Son - Pete Townshend (3:26)
  8. 8 Sensation (4:37)
  9. 9 Miracle Cure (0:23)
  10. 10 Sally Simpson (5:13)
  11. 11 Welcome - Pete Townshend (4:14)
  12. 12 T.V. Studio - Pete Townshend (1:14)
  13. 13 Tommy's Holiday Camp (1:30)
  14. 14 We're Not Gonna Take It (4:46)
  15. 15 Listening to You / See Me, Feel Me - The Who (4:19)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Roger Daltrey Vocals
Elton John Piano, Vocals
Ray Thomas Percussion
Pete Townshend Synthesizer, Guitar, Piano, Keyboards, Vocals, Choir, Chorus, Track Performer, ARP
Tina Turner Vocals
The Who Group, Track Performer
Ron Wood Guitar
Ronnie Ross Musician
Nicky Hopkins Piano
Davey Johnstone Guitar
Keith Moon Drums, Vocals
Jess Roden Vocals
Alan Ross Acoustic Guitar
Simon Townshend Vocals
Ann-Margret Vocals
Vicki Brown Vocals
Phil Chen Bass, Bass Guitar
Eric Clapton Guitar, Vocals
Ray Cooper Percussion
Geoff Daley Musician
Alison Dowling Vocals
Bob Efford Musician
John Entwistle Bass, Bass Guitar, Horn, Vocals, Brass
Paul Gurvitz Vocals
Dee Murray Bass, Bass Guitar
Margo Newman Vocals
Tony Newman Drums
Paul Nicholas Vocals
Jack Nicholson Vocals
Nigel Olsson Drums
Caleb Quaye Guitar
Mick Ralphs Guitar
Oliver Reed Vocals
Fuzzy Samuels Bass, Bass Guitar
Gerald Shaw Organ
Chris Stainton Organ, Acoustic Guitar, Piano
Chris Stanton Organ
Tony Stevens Bass, Bass Guitar
Liza Strike Vocals
Dave Wintour Bass, Bass Guitar
Mike Kelly Drums
Kenney Jones Drums
Graham Deakin Drums
Tony Neman Drums
Kit Trevor Vocals
Mylon Le Fevre Vocals
Billy Nicholls Vocals
Mike Kelly Drums
Sara McIntosh Vocals
Helen Shappell Vocals
Richard Bailey Drums
Technical Credits
Pete Townshend Composer, Lyricist, Producer, Musical Director
Nicky Hopkins Arranger
Keith Moon Composer, Lyricist
Bill Curbishley Executive Producer
Gus Dudgeon Producer
John Entwistle Composer, Lyricist
Martyn Ford Arranger
Kit Lambert Producer
Ron Nevison Engineer
Robert Stigwood Producer
Sonny Boy Williamson [II] Composer, Lyricist
Chris Stamp Executive Producer
Bill Levy Art Direction
Beryl Vertue Executive Producer
Robert Rosenberg Executive Producer
Richard Evans Art Direction, Reissue Design
Ken Russell Director, Producer, Screenplay
Ken Russell Producer
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3
( 6 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Groundbreaking

    This groundbreaking soundtrack of the filmed rock opera is nothing short of spectacular. Roger Daltrey's performance in this version is far more powerful than in his earlier work in the original Who's Tommy. Daltrey deserves recognition as rock's greatest vocalist from this performance alone. "I'm Free" and the final "See Me, Feel Me/Listening to You" set the rock opera standard bar as high as Pavarotti's "Nessun Dorma" or most any version of "Che Gelida Manina" or "O Soave Fanciulla." While Daltrey is the highlight, there are several other stellar moments including performances by Tina Turner, Eric Clapton, Simon Townsend, and of course Elton John. Although Ann-Margaret's vocals are not as strong as some of the others, she is so good in the role of Nora Walker, that any vocal shortcomings are easily overlooked and she has several moments that are particularly strong such as the sultriness and the panic that she portrays in "1951/What about the Boy." The chemistry between Ann-Margaret and Oliver Reed in "1951" is so strong that the result is an incredibly sexy song regardless of vocal abilities. She is also fabulous in "Champagne." Oliver Reed is equally superb in "1951/What about the Boy" as he goes effortlessly from oozing sex appeal and passion in "1951" to calm and reason in "What About the Boy." Jack Nicolson and Keith Moon's vocals are both pretty bad but, there again, they were good in their roles on screen. Unfortunately most rocker's don't get opera and vice versa, which is why Tommy has not received the recognition that it so richly deserves. Yes, the storyline is weird, somewhat contrived (a deaf, dumb & blind kid that plays pinball and becomes a religious cult icon?) and the ending is tragic...hello and welcome to opera! That said, all of the dramatic elements - abuse & torture with Cousin Kevin, molestation from Uncle Ernie, sex and drugs from the Acid Queen, etc. are actually more relevant today than Tosca's leap from the tower, or Turandot's systematic slaying of potential suitors. And, for Who fans and rock lovers, there are more than enough songs here to stand next to the classics. I would rank this vesion of "See Me, Feel Me/Listening to You" and "I'm Free" along side "Baba O'Reilly" and "Won't Get Fooled Again." Overall this is a really fantastic piece of work - this was one of the first albums (remember LPs?) that I ever had (I got it in 2nd or 3rd grade when the movie came out) and have been listening to this soundtrack ever since. It is a particularly great way to introduce rockers to opera and it is also a testament to the superiority of The Who to any other band. Beatles vs. The Rolling Stones - sorry but I'll take The Who!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Depends on nostalgia

    Clearly this was not the highlight of The Who's career. But it was certainly a timepiece of classic rock. You have Clapton on Eyesight to the Blind backed by Kenny Jones on drums who later replaced Keith Moon. You have Elton John at the height of his funky glasses and questionable sexuality fame before that became in vogue. Yea you have generally horrible singing by Ann-Margaret and others who should stick to acting. But that's counterbalanced by the surprises of Pete Townshend's brother Simon on Sally Simpson who is quite good, as are the women backup singers. Nicky Hopkins on the piano throughout is also talented, but it's really only worth it for anyone who is at that age where he can't identify with today's sound and is trying to hold on to yesterday, in which case, well get over it. Daltrey's voice, and the orchestration, are expanded from the original confined, generic group sound, again, a period piece for the Who in 1975 and classic rock.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Fiddle About!

    The BEST Movie Soundtrack EVER!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Tommy [Original Soundtrack]

    I remember I was at a neighbor's house on a gloomy rainy day and his sister and mother came home. His sister had just purchased this album. He was craving a grilled cheese sandwhich, so he asks his sister "Hey, Sis, do you think it'll be ok for me to have a grilled cheese sandwhich?" "I don't know, Bro, ask Mother." So he calls up to Mother (probably hiding in her room, afraid the wretched sounds of this album would hurt her ears) "Hey, Mom, can I have a grilled cheese sandwhich?" And you could her scream from the bedroom: "NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!" I left the house, realizing that the menace with the curly hair and sunglasses on the cover had caused the guy's mother to go berzerk!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    Tommy [Original Soundtrack]

    There are some tolerable moments to this otherwise unlistenable soundtrack to a dreary movie. The best of which is Elton John's rendition of "Pinball Wizard" but please don't waste $20 for that! Another is Tina Turner's "Acid Queen" (the movie sequence is perhaps the most disgusting; it's so bad I refuse to discuss it!). Another is Eric Clapton's guitar licks on "Eyesight to the Blind," though his vocal performance is "through the motions," so to speak. Beyond that, you have Ann Margaret singing "Smash the Mirror" (yes, the same Ann Margaret who guest starred as Ann Margrock on the Flintstones), Jack Nicholson as the Doctor ("Heeeeeeere's Casey!"), and Keith Moon (I love him as a drummer but not as a singer; though he was entertaining as Uncle Ernie, it's little wonder why Pete Townshend barred him from the vocal booth). Roger Daltrey sings well, but hey, that was his job in the Who. His vocal performance on the original (which is probably the one you want, unless you're either a completist or a masochist) is superior. Oh well, I love the Who and forgive them for this but save your money, people.

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews