The Tomorrow Code [NOOK Book]

Overview

THE END OF THE WORLD started quietly enough for Tane Williams and Rebecca Richards. . . .

Tane and Rebecca aren’t sure what to make of it—a sequence of 1s and 0s, the message looks like nothing more than a random collection of alternating digits. Working to decode it, however, Tane and Rebecca discover that the message contains lottery numbers . . . lottery numbers that win the next random draw! Suddenly Tane and Rebecca are rich, but who sent...
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The Tomorrow Code

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Overview

THE END OF THE WORLD started quietly enough for Tane Williams and Rebecca Richards. . . .

Tane and Rebecca aren’t sure what to make of it—a sequence of 1s and 0s, the message looks like nothing more than a random collection of alternating digits. Working to decode it, however, Tane and Rebecca discover that the message contains lottery numbers . . . lottery numbers that win the next random draw! Suddenly Tane and Rebecca are rich, but who sent the numbers? And why? More messages follow, and slowly it becomes clear—the messages are being sent back in time from Tane and Rebecca’s future. Something there has gone horribly wrong, and it’s up to them to prevent it from happening. As they follow the messages’ cryptic instructions, Tane and Rebecca begin to suspect the worst—that the very survival of the human race may be at stake.

From the Hardcover edition.

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  • Teens Video/TomorrowCode_BB_46bc2a10e91d9991278d46cc19d9117ee54b52bf
    Teens Video/TomorrowCode_BB_46bc2a10e91d9991278d46cc19d9117ee54b52bf  

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
Teenagers Tane and Rebecca fight genetic engineering gone wild in this fast-paced eco-thriller. Brainy Rebecca is the first to look for messages in a series of mysterious gamma ray bursts, but Tane's solid common sense and comfort with nature—part of his Maori heritage—makes the team fairly equal . . . until Tane's big brother enters the scene. "Fatboy" has a Harley motorcycle and a brand new Maori face tattoo. Naturally, both make him irresistible to Rebecca while creating some serious sibling rivalry between the brothers. Meanwhile there is a lottery to win, a mini-submarine, and an army of macrophages disguised as Pillsbury Dough Boys on steroids to destroy. New Zealand writer Brian Falkner sets his clever story in his own backyard. Contemporary Auckland, its suburbs, and the off-shore islands beyond become attractive settings for this end-of-the-world scenario. An added bonus is that readers can also get involved in working out the computer puzzles presented within the story. Reviewer: Kathleen Karr
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up

"The end of the world started quietly enough for Tane Williams and Rebecca Richards." This intriguing first sentence immediately draws readers into the novel. When two New Zealand teens decode a cryptic message consisting of seemingly random patterns of 0s and 1s, they are alarmed to discover that the message appears to have been sent from the future by themselves via gamma rays and warns of a disaster that could affect the entire planet. Though this is a fine premise for a speculative fiction novel, the book suffers a bit from uneven writing and sketchy science. Still, the action scenes are dramatic, the message decoding is intriguing, and the underlying pro-ecology message of respect for the Earth (or else) is timely and will be enough to keep some readers interested. However, David Klass's Firestorm (Farrar, 2006) and M. T. Anderson's Feed (Candlewick, 2002) are stronger choices.-Jane Henriksen Baird, Anchorage Public Library, AK

Kirkus Reviews
New Zealand author Falkner makes his U.S. debut with a book that resonates with a Down Under accent. With a tautly constructed plot, this fast-paced and all-too-realistic thriller asks both protagonists and readers to consider the implications of humankind's exploitation of the earth and its possibly catastrophic repercussions. Tane and Rebecca, 14-year-olds living in Auckland, receive coded messages from their future selves, warning about an apocalyptic event that only they can prevent. As they decipher the clues and race to take the right steps to save lives, readers are swept into visions of ecological disaster and a planet fighting back. With puzzles aplenty, codes, computers and a submarine called Mobius, this technothriller offers gearhead ecowarriors everything, including a hugely satisfying ending. Character development does not take a back seat to plot, however; told largely through Tane's eyes, the narrative creates a believable and sympathetic cast of characters, both main and supporting. Exciting and thought-provoking, it will raise awareness of serious issues as it entertains. (Thriller. 10 & up)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375892332
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 10/28/2008
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 368
  • Sales rank: 328,993
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • File size: 721 KB

Meet the Author

Brian Falkner often finds himself in strange and exciting situations—just the sorts of adventures he enjoys writing about! Brian is a successful children’s book author in his home country of New Zealand, where he lives with his wife, their two kids, and two dogs. To learn more about Brian, visit his Web site at brianfalkner.co.nz.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Read an Excerpt

The end of the world started quietly enough for Tane Williams and Rebecca Richards, lying on their backs on a wooden platform on Lake Sunnyvale. Which wasn’t really a lake at all.

Sunnyvale School was set in a small valley. A nice little suburban valley. A hundred years ago, it had been a nice little swamp where Pukeko and Black Stilts had competed for the best nesting positions, and croakless native frogs had snared insects with their flicking tongues. But now it was a nice little suburban valley, surrounded by nice little homes belonging to nice little homeowners who painted their fences and paid their taxes and never gave any thought to the fact that when it rained, all the water that ran through their properties also ran through the properties below, and the properties below those, and so on until it reached the lowest point of the valley floor. Which happened to be Sunnyvale School.

As a consequence, Sunnyvale School had to have very good drainage. When it rained hard, as it often did in Auckland in the spring, an awful lot of that rain made its way down from the hillsides and ended up on the playing fields and courts of the small but cheerful school.

And sometimes the water, sauntering its way down the slopes with a mind and a mischievous personality of its own, would playfully pick up odds and ends along the way with a view to blocking those very good drains that the council had put in many years ago after the first and second (and possibly the third) time the school had flooded.

Sometimes it worked, and sometimes it didn’t. It depended on what the water happened to find in its path. Little sticks and paper food wrappings washed right through the big metal grills of the drains. Small branches, stones, and other large objects generally just ended up at the bottom of the homeowners’ nice little properties.

But light twigs and pieces of plastic sailed merrily down the surface of the water and blocked the drains beautifully.

That was what had happened this particular time, and the sports fields of Sunnyvale School were covered in at least four inches of water, high enough to lap at the doorsteps of the cheerful little classrooms across the way, but fortunately not quite high enough to get inside.

Tane and Rebecca lay on their backs on the small wooden viewing platform in the center of the two main playing fields and looked up at the stars, for the rain had stopped many hours ago, and the night was clear and beautiful.

Neither of them were pupils of Sunnyvale School; in fact, both of them were far too old to attend the school, and for another fact, both of them were in their second year at West Auckland High School.

However, when they were younger, they had both gone to Sunnyvale School, which was why they knew that when it rained really hard during the day and stopped at night, it became a magical, wonderful place to be.

The stars above shone down with a piercing intensity that penetrated the haze of lights from the suburban homes around the valley. The moon, too, was lurking about, turning the weathered wood of the small platform to silver. All around them, the lights from the sky above reflected in the inky blackness that was Lake Sunnyvale. The lake that sometimes appeared on the playing fields after a particularly heavy rainstorm.

There were stars above and stars below, rippling slowly in the light breeze, and it was like being out in the center of the universe, floating through space on your back.

Tane and Rebecca thought it was the coolest place to be. On Lake Sunnyvale. After the rain.

Tane tossed a pebble into the air, and there was a satisfying plop a few seconds later as it landed. They both raised their heads to see the widening circles of ripples, shaking the foundations of the stars around them. Then, as if controlled by the same puppeteer, they put their heads back down together.

Tane’s feet were pointing one way, and Rebecca’s were pointing the other, so the tops of their heads were just about touching. If they had been boyfriend and girlfriend, they might have lain down side by side, but they weren’t, so they didn’t.

From an open window in a house somewhere on the surrounding slopes, an old Joni Mitchell folk song reached out plaintively across the water to them.

Rebecca said again, “Time travel is impossible.” She said it more firmly this time, as if that were simply the end of the discussion, and the judge’s decision was final, and no correspondence would be entered into.

Now, ordinarily Tane would have given up at that point, because Rebecca was almost certainly right. After all, it was Rebecca, and not Tane, who had aced her Level One Physics exams the previous year, the top student in the entire country, at the age of just thirteen! Which had been no real surprise to Tane, who had been in the same classes as his friend as she had confounded science teacher after science teacher and math teacher after math teacher, by somehow, instinctively, knowing as much about the subject they were teaching as they did.

Some teachers enjoyed having Rebecca in their class because she was very, very clever, if a little rebellious and uncontrollable at times. But other teachers found it stressful to have a girl among their students who took great delight in correcting them whenever they made mistakes.

So if Rebecca said that time travel was impossible, then time travel was impossible. But there was something about the stars that night. Something about their slow drift through the heavens above and below them, something about the beautifully random and randomly beautiful patterns they made.

Or then again, it might just have been that Tane liked to argue, and he especially liked to argue with Rebecca.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Table of Contents

Book 1 The Chimera Project

1 The End 3

2 Fatboy and His Moko 11

3 The Burst and Transient Source Experiment 22

4 Save the Whales 29

5 111000111 35

6 Mr. Dawson's Tree Museum 53

7 Saturday Night 65

8 Evensong 73

9 Trust 79

10 The Man from Subeo 89

11 Motukiekie 94

12 Water Works 104

13 Sea of Green 109

14 The M&oumlet;bius Trip 116

15 Butt Mop 123

16 The Rainbow Warrior 133

17 Laundry Piles 141

18 Waewaetoroa Passage 150

Book 2 The Long White Cloud

1 Bambi 161

2 New Zealand's Most Wanted 165

3 'Tis the Season 171

4 Silent Night 175

5 White Christmas 176

6 On Christmas Day 184

7 Sanctuary 191

8 An Unnatural Disaster 197

9 FTBY DNT GO 204

10 Candid Camera 210

11 Zeta 216

12 Xena 232

13 Shapes in the Mist 241

14 Epiphany 253

15 Immunity 262

16 Before the Storm 267

17 Kaitiakitanga 274

18 New Year's Eve 284

19 The Battle for Auckland 292

20 Line of Fire 301

21 Fateful Lightning 309

22 Silence in the Mist 315

23 The God from the Machine 320

24 Hobson Street 327

25 The Dream 340

26 Te Kenehi Tuarua 342

27 The Beginning 348

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 43 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(24)

4 Star

(14)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 43 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 27, 2013

    Brian Falkner¿s Tomorrow Code is a book of suspense, mystery, a

    Brian Falkner’s Tomorrow Code is a book of suspense, mystery, and thriller. Tane and Rebecca have been best friends since
     their early childhood. Now they are 14 years old and have decided to decode messages through gamma rays because they were
    talking about that topic so they decided to try it out. They were decoding Morse Code, and sequences of 1’s and 0’s.
    This kept happening until they decoded the message, “SOS”, and the winning lottery number. This leads them on an adventure that
    may well save the world. This thriller is filled with action, submarine chases, and climbing towers. Throughout the story, you can notice t
    he change in the relationship between Tane, Rebecca, and Tane’s older brother, known as “Fatboy”. It is exciting to see what troubles
    they all encounter. Also it is exciting to see how they conquer those obstacles. This story turns into a quick read after starting it because
    of its great story line making it hard to put the book down. In conclusion, Tomorrow Code by Brian Falkner is a great book for any reader
    because of its great plot and adventure.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 6, 2011

    A Great Read!

    This book was a great read. The main characters, Tane and Rebecca, talk about a machine that sends messages between the future and the present. But things get realistic when Tane and Rebecca get messages from gamma ray blasts, and the messages were actually sent from themselves in the future. It was up to Tane and Rebecca to figure out what was going on with the Chimera Project and stop whatever was happening. But as things get out of control Tane and Rebecca end up as wanted criminals, and to make matters worse a white fog is destroying the human race. In the end its up to Rebecca and Tane to figure out how to stop the fog from destroying the world. This book had good scientific explanations and was well written. I would recommend this book to most teenagers because it is a good book for science fiction but it also provides a life or death situation. -EKO

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 28, 2014

    Good book

    The book was good

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2013

    Pretty good

    Liked the book alot just didn't enjoy the ending

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 22, 2013

    Interesting

    This book is dometimes hard to follow but eventually you can understand what they're saying. It was an interesting concept though. I think it is suitable for ages 14+ but thats just my opinion. A great read though.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 5, 2013

    chicken butt

    What the bull shark

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2012

    Great

    This is the best non series book i have ever read. Highly recomended.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 9, 2012

    BEST BOOK EVER!!!!!!!

    I suggest this book to anyone and everyone-great sci-fi thriller!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 14, 2012

    Loved it - Fell right into the story!

    I know it's a good book when I can't put it down! The characters are interesting and the story is good!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 13, 2012

    good read

    i didn't like the ending but it's a good book

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2012

    Great book

    My dad brought this for me and i loved it. Pair this with Whiskey Lullaby by Brad Paisley or The Cave by Mumford and Sons and you've got an even better book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 22, 2011

    totally awesome!

    this book was amazing!

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2010

    Awesome read!!

    This book was the perfect combination of science, action, and thriller. The description and explanation of the science used in the plot was mostly very good. The gamma ray concept could have been explained differently and it could have been better. Also the way the submarine was described seemed off. Subs are not made with one big window to see and drive out of. But that seemed to be the only thing that was a little strange. The way the story made me visualize the fog and the setting was amazing. It all came to life and seemed very real. The understanding of the science and the way it came together with the fog was very nice. I love the way earth was described as having an immune system. That really caught my attention. I also really enjoyed the way the book was written. And the ending was fantastic. It really fit the book. Over all everything, the plot, setting, characters, description was great. I totally recommend this book to anyone with a love for science and action. Loved it!!


    NkF

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 5, 2010

    VERY GOOD

    This book is very goog for teenagers. I believe that this book should be read if you are around the age of 12-15. This book talks about a young boy named Tane and a girl named Rebecca. This books main focus is on talking to the past to tell them again what is going to happen in their future. Torwds the end of the book Tane and Rebecca face a fog that can wipe the whole country of New Zealend. I hope that you read this book and enjoy it it is also it is very good to share to others.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 2, 2009

    Two Thumbs Up

    I personally liked the book. It made me think "What if". I wonder if this happened to me, would I make the same decisions? What if we really are in an endless loop of the past, present, and future? What if we really can obtain messages from our future? It definitely makes you wonder.

    The book starts out with Tane and Rebecca. They find a collection of 1s and 0s in a gramma-ray. To Tane, it looks like just a group of numbers. But Rebecca thinks it is something more. It is written in computer language. Their task is to find out what it means. They find it is similar to Morris code. After deciphering the message, they are still confused. They find that the message contains numbers, lottery numbers that win the next random drawing. But who sent them, and why? The answer is at the bottom of the page, T.R, Tane and Rebecca. More disturbing than that is three letters they find in the message. S.O.S. The next message says to stop the chimera project. What is the chimera project? The chimera project is a plan to destroy the human race. The chimera is an antibody programmed against the virus, us. Now, they must stop the chimera project, before it is to late!

    I recommend this book to people ages 14 and up. Younger people might not get it. People in New Zealand might enjoy it more. The book takes place in New Zealand, and therefore has a lot of its culture. But to readers who like science fiction, or even just an adventure book, this is the book four you. It is not very long either, a fast 349 pages. Two thumbs up!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 10, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    4 out of 5 stars

    Teenagers Tane and Rebecca have been friends since anyone could remember. Rebecca has the highest grades in the class, always looks her rock-star best, and everyone admires her. But sometimes Rebecca feels no one can understand her. Her father¿s dead and her mother is wasting away in front of the television. Tane begins to have more-than-a-friend feelings about her, but Rebecca doesn¿t notice a thing. One day, Rebecca comes home to a note on her door from the government saying they are taking away the house because the bills haven¿t been paid for months. Out of pure curiosity, Tane and Rebecca start thinking about time travel. What are the likes that it could really happen? Then they start receiving coded messaged from the future. With Tane¿s boy scout experience and Rebecca¿s intelligence, they decipher the messages and are not happy to see what they have found: it¿s an SOS from¿ themselves?<BR/><BR/>The Tomorrow Code was brilliant and fascinating at first because of the character¿s uniqueness and the quality of the author¿s writing. The place and events were vivid and fun to read about but then it drew away from the characters¿ personalities that they had in the beginning. I started not to like Rebecca because she turned know-it-all and snotty. She wasn¿t herself. The events going on and the news reports that were brought into the story added so much more appeal to the book. Then, unfortunately, even the main plot began to get boring. I set this book down five times, so I read five different books between the pages of this one. I might have strolled away from the plot, I don¿t know for sure, but this book just didn¿t make it on my Recommended List.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 28, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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