Overview

To avenge a long-ago death, a killer puts Toby Peters in his sightsOn December 10, 1938, Atlanta burned again. In the back lot at David O. Selznick’s studio, sets from a dozen old pictures were pushed together and set alight to provide a backdrop for the climax of what Selznick promised to be the movie of the century: Gone with the Wind. Toby Peters, then just a studio security guard, was on hand to help keep the dozens of Confederate extras in line. When the fire was over, he found one of them dead, impaled on ...
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Tomorrow Is Another Day

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Overview

To avenge a long-ago death, a killer puts Toby Peters in his sightsOn December 10, 1938, Atlanta burned again. In the back lot at David O. Selznick’s studio, sets from a dozen old pictures were pushed together and set alight to provide a backdrop for the climax of what Selznick promised to be the movie of the century: Gone with the Wind. Toby Peters, then just a studio security guard, was on hand to help keep the dozens of Confederate extras in line. When the fire was over, he found one of them dead, impaled on his own sword. Five years later, Toby scratches out a living as a private detective for Hollywood’s finest, several of whom have just been marked for death. On the back of a cryptic poem is a list of names of men who were on the scene the night the extra died. Two are already dead. One is Clark Gable. The other is Toby himself.

Stuart M. Kaminsky (1934–2009) was one of the most prolific crime fiction authors of the last four decades. Born in Chicago, he spent his youth immersed in pulp fiction and classic cinema—two forms of popular entertainment which he would make his life’s work. After college and a stint in the army, Kaminsky wrote film criticism and biographies of the great actors and directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age. In 1977, when a planned biography of Charlton Heston fell through, Kaminsky wrote Bullet for a Star, his first Toby Peters novel, beginning a fiction career that would last the rest of his life. Kaminsky penned twenty-four novels starring the detective, whom he described as “the anti-Philip Marlowe.” In 1981’s Death of a Dissident, Kaminsky debuted Moscow police detective Porfiry Rostnikov, whose stories were praised for their accurate depiction of Soviet life. His other two series starred Abe Lieberman, a hardened Chicago cop, and Lew Fonseca, a process server. In all, Kaminsky wrote more than sixty novels. He died in St. Louis in 2009.

It's 1938 and P.I. Toby Peters is watching Atlanta burn in the biggest scene in the biggest movie ever made. When an extra is found lying dead in a ditch, Toby could swear he sees Clark Gable--Rhett Butler himself--watching from the shadows. Now, years later, Gable is receiving anonymous death threats in poetry. And frankly, my dear, why should Toby give a damn?

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Appearing for the 19th time, down-and-out Hollywood detective Toby Peters teams up with Clark Gable in this fast-paced and colorful addition to a very successful series. In 1943, after the movie star receives a poem linking him to a series of deaths (some projected), he hires the detective, whose name was written on the same sheet of paper as the poem, to investigate. Toby is unable to prevent the next killing. Further messages lead to more deaths, with all the victims having one thing in common-they had been extras in Gone with the Wind five years previously during the burning of Atlanta scene when another extra had been killed with a sword. The death had been covered up by the studio. Aided by his usual crew-midget Gunther Wherthman, landlord Jeremy Butler and dentist Sheldon Minck-Toby aims to beat the killer to other potential victims. At the same time, he tries to protect the extremely depressed Gable, who hasn't recovered from the death of his wife, Carole Lombard, the previous year and who resists Toby's attempts to stash him in a safe place. Kaminsky's masterful tale is funny, warm and powerfully moving. (Feb.)
Emily Melton
Kaminsky's latest in his popular Toby Peters series features the coolheaded, part-time sleuth facing one of his toughest cases yet. Set during World War II, when Hollywood was at its most glamorous, the plot involves the mysterious stabbing death of an extra on the set of Selznick International's "Gone with the Wind". Five years after the murder, the debonair Clark Gable approaches Toby to ask for help--seems Gable's been receiving bizarre death threats in the form of poems. He figures the threats are real, especially when several other actors who worked on the picture--and who may have witnessed the murder--turn up dead. Fortunately, Toby is a gifted gumshoe who keeps plugging away until he unravels the confounding case and saves the dashing Gable from an ignoble end. Nostalgic readers with a yen for the good old days--when men were men and movies were "movies"--will find Kaminsky's story entertaining, clever, eminently readable, and chock-full of snippets from Hollywood's Golden Age.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781453232859
  • Publisher: MysteriousPress.com/Open Road
  • Publication date: 12/13/2011
  • Series: Toby Peters Mysteries , #18
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 214
  • Sales rank: 866,857
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Stuart M. Kaminsky (1934–2009) was one of the most prolific crime fiction authors of the last four decades. Born in Chicago, he spent his youth immersed in pulp fiction and classic cinema—two forms of popular entertainment which he would make his life’s work. After college and a stint in the army, Kaminsky wrote film criticism and biographies of the great actors and directors of Hollywood’s Golden Age. In 1977, when a planned biography of Charlton Heston fell through, Kaminsky wrote Bullet for a Star, his first Toby Peters novel, beginning a fiction career that would last the rest of his life. Kaminsky penned twenty-four novels starring the detective, whom he described as “the anti-Philip Marlowe.” In 1981’s Death of a Dissident, Kaminsky debuted Moscow police detective Porfiry Rostnikov, whose stories were praised for their accurate depiction of Soviet life. His other two series starred Abe Lieberman, a hardened Chicago cop, and Lew Fonseca, a process server. In all, Kaminsky wrote more than sixty novels. He died in St. Louis in 2009. 
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