Tomorrow's Sun [NOOK Book]

Overview

Faith Reaches across the Centuries

 

Her fractures have mended, her scars faded, but Emily Foster can’t move on until she makes restitution for a past mistake. Flipping houses seems like the path to her goal. Yet, instead of finding a door to the future, the 1840s house she plans to remodel opens windows to the past.

 

Contractor Jake Braden hates Emily’s plan to modernize the old house, but the cost of fighting for guardianship of ...

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Tomorrow's Sun

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Overview

Faith Reaches across the Centuries

 

Her fractures have mended, her scars faded, but Emily Foster can’t move on until she makes restitution for a past mistake. Flipping houses seems like the path to her goal. Yet, instead of finding a door to the future, the 1840s house she plans to remodel opens windows to the past.

 

Contractor Jake Braden hates Emily’s plan to modernize the old house, but the cost of fighting for guardianship of his late sister’s twelve-year-old twins forces him to take the job anyway. When a hidden door and faded love letters connect the house with the Underground Railroad, he and Emily embark on a mission to uncover the fate of young lovers.

 

As Emily and Jake unravel the long-forgotten love story, words of faith in the face of fear inspire, convict, and draw them to each other. . .but will they be prepared when faced with the greatest test yet?

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Editorial Reviews

USA Today's Happy Ever After - Serena Chase

This is the sort of novel that, even though you may be able to guess the
Fresh Fiction

TOMORROW'S SUN is the beginning of a new series by Becky Melby. It is wonderfully written with flashbacks of the past, a little mystery and a splash of romance. The story has many wonderful inspirational messages as Emily learns that God heals and forgives, and she needs to accept that today and not dwell on what tomorrow may bring. This was a great read; I'm sure you will enjoy it.

— Viki Ferrell

USA Today's Happy Ever After

This is the sort of novel that, even though you may be able to guess the
— Serena Chase

Book Bargains and Previews

Tomorrow's Sun, the first novel in the Lost Sanctuary series, is a riveting story that keeps the reader engaged with its mystery and in-depth characters. I literally couldn't put this book down.
This is a beautifully crafted story that combines the past and the present and explores how the past has prepared, in some special way, to affect those in the future. The book has a captivating story-line of danger, romance and healing. Readers will come away from this story with fresh insight.

— Hollie S.

Reviews by Jenny

...Becky manages to weave an entrancing tale of long away happenings. This book is what happens when present intrudes on the past. It is quite an interesting idea for a book and I am glad I picked it up.

— Jenny Chaver

Once Upon a Romance

This is a very fascinating story and one that will stay with the reader for a long time. These two people have absolutely nothing in common, but he stories that came out of those historic letters are truly inspiring and sincerely beautiful. This author has done a wonderful job of plotting and research, and the characters are very believable! A Must-Read! 

— Amy Lignor

Fresh Fiction - Viki Ferrell

TOMORROW'S SUN is the beginning of a new series by Becky Melby. It is wonderfully written with flashbacks of the past, a little mystery and a splash of romance. The story has many wonderful inspirational messages as Emily learns that God heals and forgives, and she needs to accept that today and not dwell on what tomorrow may bring. This was a great read; I'm sure you will enjoy it.
Book Bargains and Previews - Hollie S.

Tomorrow's Sun, the first novel in the Lost Sanctuary series, is a riveting story that keeps the reader engaged with its mystery and in-depth characters. I literally couldn't put this book down.
This is a beautifully crafted story that combines the past and the present and explores how the past has prepared, in some special way, to affect those in the future. The book has a captivating story-line of danger, romance and healing. Readers will come away from this story with fresh insight.
Reviews by Jenny - Jenny Chaver

...Becky manages to weave an entrancing tale of long away happenings. This book is what happens when present intrudes on the past. It is quite an interesting idea for a book and I am glad I picked it up.
Once Upon a Romance - Amy Lignor

This is a very fascinating story and one that will stay with the reader for a long time. These two people have absolutely nothing in common, but he stories that came out of those historic letters are truly inspiring and sincerely beautiful. This author has done a wonderful job of plotting and research, and the characters are very believable! A Must-Read! 
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781607427506
  • Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/1/2012
  • Series: Lost Sanctuary, #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 85,592
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Becky Melby is a Wisconsin resident. She and her husband Bill have four married sons and eleven grandchildren. Becky has co-authored nine Heartsong Presents titles and written two novellas for Barbour publishing. In her spare time Becky loves riding on the back of her Honda Gold Wing or making trips to see grandkids in the RV.

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Read an Excerpt

Tomorrow's Sun

Lost Sanctuary Book One


By Becky Melby

Barbour Publishing, Inc.

Copyright © 2012 Becky Melby
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-61626-238-9


CHAPTER 1

What do you call the place you live if it isn't home?

Emily Foster blew her bangs off her forehead and tapped the steering wheel to "Haven't Met You Yet" as she searched the afternoon shadows for a street sign, and the house she wouldn't call home. For the next few months. Or weeks, if she was lucky.

Rochester, Wisconsin, population 1100. She'd have eleven hundred neighbors—and she'd try to get to know as few of them as possible. Michael Bublé said it would all work out. Emily turned at the corner, hoping he was right.

The old, white clapboard house framed in her windshield had shrunk in nineteen years. Or maybe the rest of her world had gotten too big since that innocent summer. She parked in a short strip of gravel that pointed toward the river. Opening the car door, she stared at the house across the street. It occupied the spot where she'd found God, and almost missed her first kiss. A long, measured sigh bowed her cheeks. With deep, controlled breaths, she swiveled in the seat then eased her feet to the ground. Moving like a woman three times her age, she unloaded the car and hobbled up the stone walk to the paneled door. The lock complained at the twist of the key.

In the front parlor, the plank floor groaned beneath her feet. With nothing to absorb the sound of her intrusion, each tap of her paisley-covered cane echoed off the peeling plaster.

The house was as hollow and weary as its new owner.

"Counter with a positive." The ever-nagging voice of Vanessa, her therapist—the one who therapied her mind, not the one who pummeled the rest of her—whispered a warning. "Counter with a positive thought before you teeter off the brittle edge."

Dropping her sleeping bag and air mattress in the middle of the room, Emily turned in a slow circle. First positive Wisconsin thought: Empty is not always bad. This place is full of potential.

Am I?

The front parlor was no larger than a hospital room. A poor excuse for sunlight struggled through warped glass in the nine-pane windows. Pale ovals patchworked dingy beige walls where long-dead faces had once kept watch, and spider-vein cracks trailed like quilt stitching between the phantom frames.

Emily closed her eyes, envisioning the space as it would soon be. Sans claustrophobia. By knocking out the walls that divided the main floor into five rooms, she'd create an open floor plan. New windows, gleaming floors, rich colors. Modern. Roomy. Sellable.

In the dining room, she unzipped her fleece jacket and yanked open a window. Storm- scrubbed air transfused the staleness with hints of apple blossom and made her hungry for more. On her way to the back door, she checked her watch. Fifteen minutes to kill until the first contractor arrived. Fifteen minutes best spent without walls. She hung the key ring on a black hook by the door. Kicking off her shoes, she stepped onto the porch.

The swollen Fox River bursting the hem of her temporary backyard rushed through Rochester on its way from Menominee Falls to northern Illinois. It bubbled over a massive limb hanging at a grotesque angle from a fresh gash in an oak tree. All that anchored the limb to the trunk was a narrow strip of twisted bark.

She hadn't thought about lawn care or tree trimming. She hadn't thought about much, other than putting Lake Michigan between her and the eggshell walkers.

A flash of red drew her attention from the water to a solitary pine on the north side of the yard. A male cardinal landed on a low bough. His mate called down from the top of the tree.

Emily imagined a hammock next to the pine. Maybe the white noise of the river would muffle the specters in her head.

A child's high-pitched wail caused her pulse to stumble. Laughter followed the squeal, and Emily breathed a sigh. She walked to the end of the porch and bent over the railing. Two young boys wrestled over a basketball in her side yard. On the ground beside them, a circus-colored beach ball rocked in the breeze.

Some things she wouldn't get away from, no matter how far she moved.

Turning back to the pine tree, Emily tried to conjure her imaginary hammock, but it wouldn't return. She opened the screechy screen door and stepped into the kitchen.

The floor sloped toward the back of the house. In front of the sink, a layer of pink- and-gray-flowered linoleum showed through a hole in the brick-patterned vinyl. She padded across the uneven surface to a white corner cupboard. Resting her cane against the windowsill, she unlatched a tall door, releasing memories mingled with cloves, cinnamon, and coriander. She'd been fifteen when she spent the summer visiting her best friend's great-grandmother. Cara's Nana Grace was the quintessential grandma. Memories of that magical summer and the big white house in Rochester chronicled all five senses—violets, fireflies, apple crisp, a cobwebby cellar, and the trill of tree frogs. Exploring the town on Nana Grace's wobbly old Schwinn bikes, giggling about the bare-chested guy washing his car down the street, dangling their feet in the river, talking for hours about that clumsy, dream-spinning kiss. Carefree.

The way young girls should be.

Her shoulders shuddered, an invisible weight constricting her lungs. Closing her eyes, she repeated the words branded in her brain. "Release ... relax ... let it go." With a fierce exhale, she tugged on the window next to the cupboard. It stuck. She banged on the frame with the heel of her hand and tried again. The sash gave way, sliding up so quickly she almost lost her balance.

Sweet spring air thwarted panic. Be present in the moment. The cardinals still sang. In the distance, the metered cadence of the basketball on cement joined the rhythm of the afternoon. She concentrated on the steady slap, slap, slap as she labeled the smells. Wet leaves. River mud. Charcoal smoke. Violets.

As her pulse reclaimed a normal pace, another shrill scream pierced her quiet and she slid the window down. It banged shut but didn't block the noise. The scream grew louder. Closer.

No laughter followed.

"Let it go!"

Strange to hear her therapist's advice yelled from a child's lips.

"Michael! Stop!"

The beach ball bounced toward the river, propelled by the wind. And followed by a barefoot boy. A gust whipped it against the crippled oak. The ball shot into the water.

Lord God, no. Caught in a whirlpool, the ball swirled in a tight circle. Red ... white ... yellow ... blue ...

The boy grabbed onto the broken limb with one hand and reached for the ball with the other.

Emily's pulse thundered in her ears. Her breath rasped, fast and shallow. Black walls pushed in, narrowing her vision.

The limb swayed. A crack split the air. "Michael!" A man's voice. "I'll get the ball. Come here. Now."

The boy stopped and waved toward the voice, then glanced up at her and waved again.

The room tilted. Emily closed her eyes. Release. Relax. Let it go.

Her legs gave way. She slid to the floor, biting her lip against the stab of pain in her right hip. Knees to chest, arms encircling her legs, she folded. Making herself small.

A heavy knock shook the screen door. She shrank against the cupboard.

The door rattled again. "I don't think she's home."

A lighter, quieter knock followed. "I just sawed her," a small voice insisted. "Just now in the window."

"Miss Foster? Jacob Braden, Braden Improvements."

Emily rubbed her eyes with both hands. Go away. She'd call the contractor tomorrow, make up some excuse. A headache or phone call. Tomorrow she'd be rested, calmer, able to think.

"Go in," the small voice whispered.

"We can't just walk in. That's rude." Footsteps retreated. "Come on."

"Nuh-uh. Nana Grace lets us."

"Nana Grace is—Michael! You can't—"

Hinges whined. Emily raised her head from her cocoon.

Bare feet. Red shorts. Huge brown eyes. "I'm Michael."

Breathe. Emily clenched and unclenched tingling fingers. Live in the now. "Hi, Michael. I'm Emily." She smiled. It felt almost natural.

"Nana Grace gived us peanuhbutter cookies."

"I'm sorry. I haven't had time to bake."

The door opened again. A man: dusty work boots, one lace untied and trailing; faded jeans, hole on the right knee; snug, heather-blue shirt; sun-lightened brown hair curling over his collar. Eyebrows rose above inquisitive eyes. "Are you all right?"

"I'm fine." She was sitting on the floor, half-curled in a ball. Not a chance he'd believe her. "Just ... trying to get a feel for the place."

He nodded and a chunk of gold-licked hair swung over his forehead. He looked toward the window and Emily witnessed a split-second startle. He'd seen the cane. He wiped his palms on his jeans and cleared his throat. "Can I give you a hand?"

There was only one way she could get to her feet from where she was now, and Jacob Braden's hand wouldn't help. "Why don't you go ahead and look around and I'll join you in—"

The back door moaned once again. The older boy bounded in. "Michael, Mom said you gotta get home." Eyes almost identical to his little brother's jerked to Emily then up to the man beside him. "Why is she sitting on the floor?" he asked in a hushed tone, as if she couldn't hear.

"Russell, say hi to Miss Foster. She's going to be your new neighbor. She's sitting on the floor because she's tired. Miss Foster just drove all the way from ... Minnesota?"

"Michigan. Traverse City."

"That's a long drive." He nudged the boy.

"Hi. I'm Russell. It's nice to meet you." The words came out stilted, rehearsed. Precious. "Did you see the ghost yet?"

A chill shimmied up her spine. "Ghost?"

Jacob Braden put a hand on Russell's head. "Local legend. In a town with this much history, people mix a little truth with a lot of fantasy. This house has been around a long time." He ruffled the boy's hair. "Say good-bye, boys."

Michael took one last look at the empty counter, waved, and ran out. Russell said good-bye, turned toward the door then stopped. "My mom says maybe you will babysit us. Do you have any boys?"

Emily shook her head. "I'm sorry, I don't."

No cookies. No little boys.

Not this side of heaven.

* * *

The soles of Jake's boots whispered in the worn depressions in the steps. If these stairs could talk ... A century and a half of footfalls. Newlyweds slipping off to bed ... a worried mother walking her feverish baby ... children's voices echoing in the steep, narrow stairwell ... The stories this house could tell. He reached the top and ran his hand over the newel post. Smooth. Polished by countless hands.

He smiled as he walked into a bedroom. What a sentimental schmuck he was.

Looking down at the river through wavy blown glass, he listened for footsteps. Then it hit him—maybe the lady couldn't climb stairs. What was wrong with her anyway? The multicolored cane could have been left by the old woman who'd died right there in that kitchen a few months back, but he doubted it. And something about the wary look in Emily's wide-set eyes told him her problems weren't just physical. But in that area he was out of his element. Houses he could read. Women he almost always misinterpreted. He still hadn't recovered from the last mistake.

With dark blond hair pulled straight back and no makeup, he'd guess her to be an accountant or lawyer. Something dry and bookish. She'd told him on the phone this was her first house flip. He didn't like the way she'd said it. But then, he didn't like the term flip anyway. It sounded like something fast, cheap. Flippant. She wouldn't get fast or cheap out of him if he took the job.

If he took the job.

He waited a respectful few minutes, gazing down at trees bursting with new, bright green leaves. Skinny branches arched over the river like hundreds of fishing poles. The water was as high as he'd ever seen it. If he found a spare minute he'd get out the kayak. Another big if.

He was walking out the door when he heard her. Slow, halting steps up the stairs. He backtracked to the window and pretended to be absorbed in the flight of a fat robin toting a strip of blue plastic.

"Sorry to keep you waiting." Emily Foster stopped in the doorway. "I think I mentioned on the phone that I had the house thoroughly inspected before I bought it. The roof was replaced nine years ago. I've hired painters for the exterior and I plan on sanding the porch myself. The foundation is sound. So"—she nodded toward the wall between the two north bedrooms—"why don't we start up here? I'm thinking these two rooms, with a bath in between, will be the master suite."

Jake's jaw tightened as he glanced at the row of old hooks in a small, open closet. Knocking out that closet would be nothing short of criminal. He grunted for her to continue the torture.

"This is a weight-bearing wall." She tapped it with the tip of her cane. A triangle chunk of plaster landed between them. "But with a header, I think it'll work. If we—"

"Can we back up a sec?" Jake rubbed the back of his neck. "First of all"—he stretched out his hand—"maybe we should actually meet. Jake Braden."

"Yes. You're right." She held out a pale hand and shook his. "Nice to meet you face-to-face."

He'd seen more enthusiasm in a smoked trout.

He planted his hands on his belt. "Before we get started, tell me what you already know about the history of the house so I don't bore you with stories you've already heard."

The girl blinked. Twice, then again. Did she not understand the request?

"Most of the wiring was replaced in the seventies and, like I said, the roof—"

"I mean history. Like what happened here, who lived here."

"Oh." That expression could only be labeled annoyance. "It was built in the 1840s and it was a little over a hundred years old when the Ostermanns bought it. Grace's great- granddaughter told me legend has it that the man who built this house served with Abraham Lincoln in the Blackhawk War, and Lincoln stopped here once for a visit. That tidbit could come in handy as a selling point."

Selling point? The greatest president this country ever knew could have slept in this very room and she called it a tidbit? Jake exhaled and almost forgot to take another breath.

"The main floor was redone at some point, but the second story here is all original lath and plaster." She tapped the toe of her sandal on the chunk of plaster between them. "I've drawn up plans to open up both floors. The place pretty much needs a complete overhaul."

Overhaul? Jake's sentimental soul writhed. Her word choice summoned visions of steamrollers and wrecking balls. "It needs some cosmetics, but—"

"The layout is boxy."

Jake folded his arms to stop his elbows from jutting out like a frilled-neck lizard. It's a Greek Revival house, lady. He counted the boards from the door to her cane. "You're planning on selling as soon as it's done, right?"

She gave him an of-course look. "Yes. I'm hoping to have it on the market by the end of July."

Jake aspirated her last word and fought strangulation for several breaths. "I ... think ... that might be a bit ... ambitious." He pulled a notebook from his back pocket. "Why don't we take a walk-through. You tell me exactly what you want, and I'll tell you what I'm willing to do and how long it should take."

"Fair enough." Her lips pressed against each other.

He tried to picture her with a smile.

"Nobody's looking for this many bedrooms these days." She walked out into the hall. "We can put a bath over there and enlarge that bedroom." Again, she pointed with the cane. And then we can ..."

We? Who's we? He followed her around like a trained pup, taking notes, asking for clarification.

But he wasn't a hoop jumper. As much as he needed the work, he'd already made up his mind.

Before he said no, the woman needed a history lesson.

* * *

She didn't have to like him to hire him.

Emily leaned on the railing as she clunked down the stairs ahead of him. He would be the chivalrous type, letting her go first. She led him to the front room, where she'd dropped her sleeping bag. A duct-taped corner of her second copy of Flipping Houses for Dummies peeked out of her duffel bag.

He glanced at her meager belongings. "You're not sleeping on the floor, are you?"


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Tomorrow's Sun by Becky Melby. Copyright © 2012 Becky Melby. Excerpted by permission of Barbour Publishing, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 67 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(44)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(4)

1 Star

(3)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 67 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 9, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    An Intriguing Story!

    Broken, emotionally scarred, and determined, Emily Foster purchases a house in Michigan to atone for her past sins. Flipping the house seems like a quick way to reach her goal. The unnerving yet handsome contractor she hires seems reluctant to flip her historic house. Contractor Jake Braden has too much to deal with, including his recent goal of obtaining guardianship of his late sister's twins. When Emily and Jake uncover evidence that the house may have been a stop on the underground railroad, they attempt to uncover more clues about the house's past owners. The story of lost love in Emily's house sets the stage for what might become their own lost love.

    Tomorrow's Sun, the first novel in the Lost Sanctuary series, is a riveting story that keeps the reader engaged with its mystery and in-depth characters. I literally couldn't put this book down.

    Becky Melby has crafted a beautiful story that weds history and the present as she explores how the past has prepared, in some special way, to affect those in the future.

    Filled with beautiful prose, witty dialogue, and a captivating story-line of danger, romance and healing, readers will come away from this story with fresh insight. Becky Melby pens a story of characters who experience transformation and change.

    While this story is definitely engaging, readers might become a bit annoyed at how the author flashbacks to the past at the end of an incomplete scene that leaves one desperate to know what will happen next. It felt like an immediate jump from one plot to another. Though these scenes of the past are used to provide readers with important information that is pertinent to the scene in the present tense, I personally found it a bit jarring in the middle of an unfulfilled scene. Yes, she returned to the scene once the past was over, but it still felt like an interruption.

    That said, the scenes of the past were most certainly intriguing and enjoyable, and they managed to capture the reader's imagination. I just wish the author had presented those scenes after she finished with the scene we'd been reading, instead of inserting it into the middle.

    Another thing I found a bit unnerving, though it's done in a way that never leaves the reader confused, is the massive number of sub-plots and character goals involved in this story. It just seemed like far too many.

    Again, the number of sub-plots never leaves the reader confused, and in fact, it's done with exquisite skill since Becky Melby blends them all together. Given the separate plot involving the past connection with the house two sub-plots would have been sufficient for this story.

    I thoroughly enjoyed every moment of this story, and I loved the romance that develops between the characters! I definitely recommend Tomorrow's Sun.

    I received a complimentary copy of this book from Barbour Publishing via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.

    10 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    Loved it!

    A perfect combination of history, mystery and romance. I stayed up until after 3 a.m. to finish this wonderful book.

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2013

    Highly recommended

    I really enjoyed this novel. The history that was worked in so well was very interesting and made for an educating read. I would recommend it to teenagers, perhaps 13+, because there is some romamce. The way the book jumped between present and past gave us more of the story behind the story with out giving anything away.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 30, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    A Loaded Book!

    Emily comes to Rochester WI to flip a house she bought. She only plans to stay just long enough to get the job done and move on to her next house until she has enough money to pay a debit she really can never repay. She has no intention of making friends or getting close to anyone. She soon meets Jake who is a contractor and she hires him to do the work on the house. She soon finds herself getting to know Jake and and his family and finds it hard to not get close to them. A long the way she finds the house she has bought was once a part of the underground railroad back in the 1850’s. Will this discovery help her let go of her past that will haunt her no matter how many houses she flips?

    Jake is busy worrying about his niece and nephew and how to get custody of them over their good for nothing stepdad. When he meets Emily he wonders if she needs saved from something. He soon finds himself caring for her but will her past and his family problems be to much for them to work through?

    I will say I enjoyed this book but it’s a deep book with lots of things going on.

    What I liked: I really liked the characters. The author did a good job telling their stories and explaining there feelings. I also felt this book had just the right amount of people telling the story. This book is brought to life by Emily, Jake, Lexi(Jakes niece) and Adam(Jakes nephew). I thought these different angles fit together very well to tell this story. The readers also get to go back in time to 1852 and learn about the underground railroad through the eyes of Hannah and Liam. There story was much shorter and was very much a side story that helped tell the main story but it was well put together and I wish we could have gotten to know them a little better. Plus the suspense at the climax of the book had me turning pages as fast as I could read!

    What I did not like: There was a LOT going on in this book almost to much for me. Here are some of the things this book deals with. Trying to make right a wrong, death of a loved one, underground railroad, not being able to have children, child abuse etc. It’s all handled well and beautifully written but it’s a loaded book.

    I am very glad I read this book. I really enjoyed it and loved learning about the underground railroad and how it worked. I could read a book on the subject alone! I also really liked how this book brings to light god’s forgiveness and love. I am looking forward to the next book in this series due out later this year.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 24, 2013

    Excellent historical novel.  Great story!!  Recommend Highly!!

    Excellent historical novel.  Great story!!  Recommend Highly!!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 18, 2013

    Awesome read.....

    This was truly an awesome read. It had some history & tempting romance.
    HappyReading

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 13, 2013

    Great book

    If you enjoy reading about the Underground Railroad, you love this book. This a story of a modern day woman trying to put together her broken life while learning about a woman in the past that helped run away slaves.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2013

    A perfect read.

    Enjoyed my daily read with this story.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 30, 2013

    Fresh modern day read.

    Quick and enjoyable book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 21, 2013

    Highly recommended

    A good read. Well written.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 7, 2013

    Good read - recommend.

    Greatly enjoyed reading this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 6, 2013

    Wonderful story!

    I love how the present was intertwined with the past. The characters become your friends and family. You cannot help but become part of them.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2013

    Anonymous

    Great story. If you haven't read it yet, your missing a good story.:


    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2013

    Anonymous

    Too many different people that arent really explained and become confusing.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2013

    Great read

    This is a very good story

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 18, 2013

    Awsome

    Awsome

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2013

    Entertaining read

    I enjoyed this book. It was just a nice story.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 6, 2012

    Good

    Tomorrows Sun by Becky Melby review
    4 Stars
    I have always wanted a secret room since I first read about one as a child.
    Tomorrow's Sun is uplifting, historical, christian & romantic all in one book.
    Emily Foster has bought a old house to fix up and flip it and go to another town and do the same thing working her way to California.
    Emily bought the old house from a friend who inheirted from her grandma. When they were teens they both came and stayed with her for awhile.
    Emily has been in a bad accident and she still uses a cane and in pain.
    Jake Braden is one of the contracters bidding on doing the job. Jake owns his family company and lives with his mother. Jake sister died and left twins who are with their stepfather. Jake wants custody of them.
    Lexie & Adam are in seventh grade. They do not like their stepfather. He is mean but likes the money he gets for them. They are smart.
    The story jumps back to day of the Underground Railroad. Hannah lived in this house and loved Liam who was learning to be a blacksmith during the day and a conductor at night.
    Emily & Jake find a secret room down in the cellar. Jake right off thinks it was part of the underground railroad. They also find a few letters but want to find out more.
    I liked the story. It deals when some issues that they all are facing. I would read more of these books. I was given the ebook to read in exchange of honest review from Netgalley.
    01/01/2012 PUB Barbour Publishing, Inc.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2013

    Very interesting and fun read.  Love the little bit of history a

    Very interesting and fun read.  Love the little bit of history added to the story.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 28, 2013

    Loved this book

    I really enjoyed reading this book l am a civil war history buff anyway and with a good love story thrown in i was sold!! :)

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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