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Tony's Hard Work Day
     

Tony's Hard Work Day

5.0 3
by Alan Arkin, AnnMarie Infanger (Illustrator)
 

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The new house in the country needs fixing. Father is hammering, Mother is sewing, Matthew is painting, and Adam is chopping. But four-year-old Tony isn't doing anything, because they won't let him help. "You are too small," they all say ... or so they think. So, with his dog at his side, Tony goes for a walk in the woods and decides that he will work on his own

Overview

The new house in the country needs fixing. Father is hammering, Mother is sewing, Matthew is painting, and Adam is chopping. But four-year-old Tony isn't doing anything, because they won't let him help. "You are too small," they all say ... or so they think. So, with his dog at his side, Tony goes for a walk in the woods and decides that he will work on his own project. And that is exactly what he does - with mud and water, leaves and grass, trees and pebbles, and stones. Tony works the whole day long, and what he does will delight his readers as much as it excites his family.

About the Author: Alan Arkin is an Oscar-nominated and Tony-award winning actor, director, and writer. Alan has authored six books for children, including The Lemming Condition, which was chosen for inclusion in the White House library.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publishers Weekly
From actor Alan Arkin, the 30th-anniversary edition of Tony's Hard Work Day is reissued with new illustrations by debut artist AnnMarie Infanger. When no one will accept his offer to help, Tony takes matters into his own hands. Infanger's full-bleed and panel paintings chart Tony's progress as he lays the foundation of "[his] own house," a log cabin with a chimney; even his b&w spotted dog gets in on the act, weaving a rug from tall grasses. (Aug.) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Tony's family has bought a house in the country for Tony, his brother Adam and his brother Matthew. Tony's new house needs lots of work, and the family begins immediately to repair the windows, paint the rooms, and even chop wood for the fireplace. Tony is eager to help, but he is too small to do anything. Every time he offers to help, his family tells him that he is too little, and he will get hurt. So Tony and his puppy set out on their own to build a house. As Tony's family labors over the repairs of their home, Tony cuts logs for his house, moves rocks for the chimney, and uses tall meadow grass to weave a rug. This is a delightful story for young readers. It will teach them to use their imagination. The colors and the illustrations bring the story to life. This is a story to share, whether with students, grandchildren, or children. 2002 (orig. 1972), Gibbs Smith Publisher,
— Joyce Rice

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586851811
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
07/01/2002
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.37(w) x 10.80(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Read an Excerpt

There was a lot of work to do in the country. Painting work and cleaning work and hanging up curtains and taking down spiderwebs and hammering and nailing and things like that. "Let me help," Tony said to his father. "Let me hammer." "No, you are too small," Tony's father answered. "You would hit yourself with the hammer, and then you would cry, and we would all have to stop working and hold you for a little while, so that's not a good idea."

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Tony's Hard Work Day 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Wonderful book. I enjoyed the story thoroughly and the illustrations even more so. I love childrens books and this is one of my favorites. I hope to see more books illustrated by Ann Marie Infanger. The book is one to treasure.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'Tony's Hard Work Day' captures the imagination of youth and every child's wish to be part of the grown-up world. With wonderful illustrations from AnnMarie Infanger this book is a classic for any son, daughter, nephew, niece, grandchild, neighbor, or friend. It's GREAT!
Guest More than 1 year ago
I was given this book when I was a little girl and it instantly became one of my favorite books. I still keep it in my library today. The book is wildly imaginative and teaches children that the only real limits that exist are the ones they make, not the ones others try to make them adhere to. It's a shame that this book is no longer in print because it's truly timeless. If you see it anywhere grab a copy and then torture yourself by giving it away to a child that's dear to you.