Too Many Frogs!

Too Many Frogs!

5.0 1
by Ann Hassett, John Hassett
     
 

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Nana Quimby has a problem. She wants to bake a cake, but it seems her cellar is filled with water! Too much water! Nana puts a call in to the plumber, who makes a house call. After the plumber leaves and the water is gone, with just one thump, Nana Quimby has an even bigger problem: TOO MANY FROGS! First one frog comes from the basement. Then ten frogs. Then

Overview

Nana Quimby has a problem. She wants to bake a cake, but it seems her cellar is filled with water! Too much water! Nana puts a call in to the plumber, who makes a house call. After the plumber leaves and the water is gone, with just one thump, Nana Quimby has an even bigger problem: TOO MANY FROGS! First one frog comes from the basement. Then ten frogs. Then twenty, thirty, then more! Nana Quimby goes about her cake-making business. But the thumping, bumping, banging, bonking frogs become too much to ignore! With the help of some clever neighborhood kids, will Nana Quimby be able to solve her problem and enjoy her cake in peace and quiet? CROAK!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The Hassetts' animal-beleaguered Nana Quimby (Mouse in the House; Cat Up a Tree) is back, and this time there's "a damp sort of sound" coming from her cellar—it's full of water. She fixes that problem, but then little frogs invade her kitchen; they're skinny, unassuming frogs, but Nana Quimby complains anyway: "Too many frogs." "Put the frogs in a goldfish bowl," orders a girl who's jumping rope outside. On the advice of other children—all round-faced, like Nana—her mugs, pots, pans, sink, bathtub, and washing machine are pressed into service as more frogs appear, providing much visual comedy. In the end, she must refill the cellar with water to lure them out of the kitchen. Cupcake colors animate Nana Quimby's kitchen and her friendly urban neighborhood, while silly noises ("thump-thump-bang-bang-bonk"), repeating phrases, and improbable numbers ("She opened the door, and a million frogs hopped, jumped, bumped, and bounced across the kitchen floor") keep this sweet tale moving smartly along. Most satisfying is the way that the children get to order Nana Quimby around, and the humility with which she obeys them. Ages 4–8. (July)
From the Publisher
"Cupcake colors animate Nana Quimby's kitchen and her friendly urban neighborhood, while silly noises ("thump-thump-bang-bang-bonk"), repeating phrases, and improbable numbers ("She opened the door, and a million frogs hopped, jumped, bumped, and bounced across the kitchen floor") keep this sweet tale moving smartly along."—Publishers Weekly

"Young listeners will quickly memorize the story and then focus on everything else that is happening in proximity to Nana Quimby’s latest eccentric encounter with wildlife."—Kirkus 

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Here comes Nana Quimby—earnest, rotund, wearing her long lilac dress with a white apron and sneakers, worried about water in her basement, trying to bake a cake. (She must live in Maine, as do the author and illustrator.) A plumber can deal with the water, but what about the ten green frogs that come hopping out of the cellar? Nana calls, "Too many frogs!" out the window and a neighborhood girl advises her to put them in a goldfish bowl. Viewers can have fun watching (and counting) the long-legged creatures as they keep bouncing out of the basement in tens, making Nana hop, too, struggling to find ever-bigger containers for each new invasion. Passing boys and girls come up with helpful ideas, while poor Nana must get the frogs into water and, at the same time, get her cake mixed, baked and frosted. Could there be a million frogs? What to do now? Nana's on her own with this decision, but kids will chuckle at the solution, as a bemused Nana sits on her cellar steps with a cup of tea and a slice of the cake (listeners might invent some solutions of their own). Artist Hassett's acrylic paintings full of whimsical details lead readers through Nana's kitchen, laundry, and bathroom, each filled with a foam of frogs to be counted. Young mathematicians could also enjoy counting with the Hassetts' Cat Up a Tree (Houghton Mifflin, 1998), while a perfect follow-up is David Schwartz and Steven Kellogg's How Much is a Million? (HarperCollins, 2004). And don't forget to check the back cover to see Nana's friends sharing the cake! Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft
School Library Journal
PreS-K—Nana Quimby's cellar is filled with water. The paperboy suggests calling a plumber, who gets rid of the water, but that's just the beginning of the woman's problems. As she tries to make a cake, she is interrupted again and again by growing numbers of frogs coming up from the basement in search of water. The neighborhood children offer ideas for places to put them, and soon her cups, pots and pans, washing machine, sink, and bathtub are filled with the little critters. In the end, Nana Quimby realizes that a cellar filled with water is a perfect place for a million frogs, and not a bad place to soak one's feet and enjoy a nice piece of cake on a warm summer day. This is the third nonsensical tale featuring the nonplussed, sneakered white-haired lady with nose-pinching round eyeglasses, and it's the most fun. Children can count the frogs in the colorful acrylic cartoon illustrations—first 10, then 20, 30, 40, 50,…100! They will also enjoy the zany antics of the youngsters outside Nana's window and the woman's growing comfort with the frogs that have invaded her tall skinny brick house. Quirky fun—especially suited for one-on-one sharing.—Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH
Kirkus Reviews

It's a modern-day plague of frogs.

After a basement flood and the departure of the plumber, Nana Quimby's kitchen is overrun with frogs, coming in larger and larger armies up the basement steps. Nana Quimby seeks advice from passing children by shouting her dilemma out her window: "Too many frogs!" Each child suggests containment. "Put the frogs in a goldfish bowl," directs the first, and after that the children recommend in turn: cups, pots and pans, the sink, the washing machine, the bathtub. Chaos creeps in with each wave of frogs, and at last Nana Quimby is at a loss to contain the final million bumping in from the basement. The solution? Fill the basement with water. The thin tale is hardly the point, though, as it provides just the right amount of structure for a series of disarmingly funny scenes of busy children calling out advice and Nana Quimby determinedly containing frogs. Warm acrylics lend a delicious coziness to the scenes of froggy mayhem in Nana Quimby's kitchen, and the text in Garamond looks wonderfully fey next to the odd and quirky lines of the illustrations.

Young listeners will quickly memorize the story and then focus on everything else that is happening in proximity to Nana Quimby's latest eccentric encounter with wildlife.(Picture book. 2-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547362991
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
07/11/2011
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
10.20(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

John and Ann Hassett have been collaborating on picture books for more than ten years. Their books are known for their quirky humor and lively illustrations. The Hassetts live and work in Maine, where their “commute to work is short (upstairs, and first door on the right).”

John and Ann Hassett have collaborated on many heartwarming picture books for children. They live in Waldoboro, Maine, with two small girls, chickens, and a dog, as well as mice in the walls.

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Too Many Frogs! 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous 5 months ago
My son loves this book. Its been one of his favorites since he was 2, he is now almost 6 and still loves it!