Too Many Frogs!

Too Many Frogs!

by Sandy Asher, Keith Graves
     
 

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Rabbit lives alone. He cooks for himself, cleans up for himself, and at the end of the day, reads himself a story. It's a simple life, and he likes it. But one evening, Froggie shows up at his door. He wants to listen to Rabbit's story, too. While eating a snack-or three. While lounging on a pillow-or ten. And bringing over his family-dozens and dozens of frogs!…  See more details below

Overview


Rabbit lives alone. He cooks for himself, cleans up for himself, and at the end of the day, reads himself a story. It's a simple life, and he likes it. But one evening, Froggie shows up at his door. He wants to listen to Rabbit's story, too. While eating a snack-or three. While lounging on a pillow-or ten. And bringing over his family-dozens and dozens of frogs! Rabbit has finally had enough; Froggie will have to go! But when he sits down alone to read himself a story, Rabbit realizes something is missing: someone to listen; someone to share a wonderful story.
Keith Graves' boisterous, humor-filled artwork lends just the right touch to this multilayered tale that celebrates the joy of reading aloud.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
This rollicking nod to the pleasures of sharing a good book, features a psychedelic-blue rabbit who savors the isolated bliss of his own living room to read an evening story. Enter boisterous Froggie who disrupts Rabbit's peaceful existence, but loves listening to Rabbit's nightly stories. Rabbit's increasing frustration with his unwelcome guest is delightfully mirrored in his facial expressions and his ear movements, as oblivious Froggie eventually arrives with a horde of amphibian relatives to join the fun. Finally, Rabbit has had enough and throws them all out, only to discover he rather misses their companionship after all. Young children will enjoy the bouncy language, and the repetition as Froggie's visits escalate. Ample white space makes the simple text easy to see, and the different perspectives in the illustrations keep things lively. Humorous details include silly book titles on Rabbit's shelf. Parallel themes of people needing people—or in this case rabbits needing frogs—and the camaraderie of sharing a good story are well presented. 2005, Philomel Books/Penguin, Ages 3 to 6.
—Quinby Frank
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Rabbit has a well-scripted, predictable life until Froggie knocks on his door one night. His guest loves to listen to this big blue rabbit with oversized ears read a story and likes it even more when he has prepared himself a snack or gotten cozy-night after night. Polite Rabbit refrains from refusing entry until Froggie shows up with his entire family. As he settles himself down to read alone, however, he realizes that he misses Froggie and invites the whole crew in. The humorous illustrations create empathy for Rabbit but also for Froggie, who is genuinely delighted to listen to a story. The varied facial expressions lend credence to the adage "A picture is worth a thousand words." The simple text may say "but before he could begin, there was that knock-knockety-knocking again!" but the horror on Rabbit's face is priceless. A fun story that celebrates reading and standing up for oneself.-Linda M. Kenton, San Rafael Public Library, CA Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Asher and Graves pay respects to the pleasures of reading aloud in this tale of a solitary rabbit saddled with an unwanted visitor. One stormy night, just as Rabbit's about to sit down in his easy chair with a book, Frog knocks at the door, begging shelter. After listening raptly while Rabbit reads, Frog departs with thanks-but returns for more the next night, and for several nights after that, making himself more and more at home, too. A peace-loving sort, Rabbit puts up with the intrusion-until Frog shows up with a score of relatives. Using his customary palette of intense, opaque colors, Graves casts the episode with pop-eyed, Ren-and-Stimpy-like figures, comically contrasting rotund, cheery frogs with a bright blue rabbit who sports skinny, immensely long ears and a fussy look. Furiously slamming the door on Frog and his kin, Rabbit then discovers that reading to himself just isn't the same, and so relents. Readers and listeners alike will applaud his decision. (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399246999
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
10/28/2006
Edition description:
Modern Gem Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.24(w) x 10.04(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
4 - 11 Years

Meet the Author


Sandy Asher is the author of twenty books for young readers and more than three dozen plays. She is also the editor or co-editor of five collections of fiction, including Dude! Stories and Stuff for Boy, On Her Way: Stories and Poems about Growing Up Girl and With All My Heart, With All My Mind: 13 Stories about Growing Up Jewish -- winner of the 1999 National Jewish Book Award in children's literature. Sandy has been honored with the American Alliance for Theatre and Education's Charlotte Chorpenning Award for a distinguished body of work in theatre for young audiences, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship grant, and an Aurand Harris Playwriting Fellowship from the Children’s Theatre Foundation of America. She lives in Lancaster, PA, with husband Harvey, dog Rudy, and cats Natasha and Stanley.

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