Too Soon to Tell

Too Soon to Tell

by Calvin Trillin
     
 

The topical essays of Too Soon to Tell reveal Calvin Trillin at his barbed and irrepressible best. Dealing with matters of the family, he tells the tale of a couple who were at first pleased that their twenty-six-year-old son had finally moved out ("If Jeffrey's going to find himself, it would probably help for him to look somewhere other than his own room")See more details below

Overview

The topical essays of Too Soon to Tell reveal Calvin Trillin at his barbed and irrepressible best. Dealing with matters of the family, he tells the tale of a couple who were at first pleased that their twenty-six-year-old son had finally moved out ("If Jeffrey's going to find himself, it would probably help for him to look somewhere other than his own room") and then realized that they had lost the ability to videotape. Grappling with educational issues, he discusses whether the presence of Michael Milken as a lecturer at the UCLA business school means that its religion department will get around to employing Jim Bakker ("Church Management 101: Imaginative Ideas in Religious Fund-Raising"). In the field of world affairs, he deals with the role of astrologers ("The planets are perfect for trading arms for hostages and saying you didn't") and whether the language laws in Quebec really require the hiring of a mime who doesn't speak French rather than a mime who doesn't speak English. Trillin's short takes send us back to life refreshed and delighted.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This collection of amiable satire draws from both Trillin's syndicated column and his writings for the New Yorker. (Aug.)
Library Journal - Library Journal
Every few years, Trillin gathers a bunch of his syndicated columns on anything and everything and converts them into a book. This is his fifth such collection. It is difficult to find anything new or particularly illuminating to say about Trillin. In this book, readers will discover precisely what they would expect from past acquaintance: wit, spiced with a tang of tolerant cynicism; a chuckly sort of humor rather than a guffawing one; a purged prose in which the inessential is resolutely excluded; and little in the way of subject matter to which he will not give at least a flying salute. A sturdy package job that makes for good reading. Recommended. [Previewed in Prepub Alert, LJ 2/1/95.]-A.J. Anderson, GSLIS, Simmons Coll., Boston
Donna Seaman
Is there anything Trillin can't write about? Here, in his latest collection of hilarious, short, and spicy essays, he has his say on such far-flung topics as geckos, Russia, Louisiana hot sauce, the cold war, Iowa, monkfish, why Saudi women aren't allowed to drive, rock music, presidents, embezzlers, slide rules, car phones, slang, peanuts, and family life. Trillin's columns are like magic tricks; he distracts us with one hand, while pulling a bouquet of flowers from behind our ear with the other. But it's more than showmanship: Trillin's pithy, always witty observations are sharp, bright, and resonant. We find ourselves not only laughing out loud but nodding in wry recognition. And there's no end to the sort of absurdities that intrigue Trillin, both benign and frightful. In fact, in one essay, he frets that real life has become so ludicrous that it's rendering exaggeration, an essayist's key tool, obsolete.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780708958216
Publisher:
Ulverscroft Large Print Books, Ltd.
Publication date:
01/01/1996
Series:
Niagara Large Print Series
Pages:
384

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