Too Tight, Benito!

Too Tight, Benito!

by Janeen Brian, Judith Rossell
     
 

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Benito Bear had grown during the long days of summer . . .

Summer is over and Benito the bear cub needs a new place to hibernate for the winter. His old cubby hole is now too small! Benito searches high and low for the perfect new home, but neither fox holes, rabbit burrows, nor ant holes are the right size. Just in the nick of time, this not-so-little

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Overview

Benito Bear had grown during the long days of summer . . .

Summer is over and Benito the bear cub needs a new place to hibernate for the winter. His old cubby hole is now too small! Benito searches high and low for the perfect new home, but neither fox holes, rabbit burrows, nor ant holes are the right size. Just in the nick of time, this not-so-little cub finds the perfect place for a long winter’s nap.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
This book from Australia uses the story of a growing bear cub to explore one of the central issues of early childhood. Getting bigger is what all children desire but it is hard to measure whether one is really doing it. In this story, Benito Bear does get good evidence that he is in fact growing—he cannot wriggle into his familiar cubby hole. So Benito wanders through the woods finding lots of holes that suit one animal or another, but not Benito. Many are too small and one is so big it is scary. He ends up back in his old one and manages to solve his own problem by digging it wider and deeper until Benito's "too-small cubby hole was now a just-right, not-too-tight Benito Bear cubby hole." The illustrations give a good picture of the size issues and support the vivid language such as "wriggled" and "squirmed." This is a great book for bringing early childhood math to life in a way that offers an opportunity to also explore social-emotional issues. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
Kirkus Reviews
Falling leaves tell Benito Bear that it's almost time to crawl into his cubby-hole for his winter sleep, but he discovers that he has outgrown his hole and must find another soon. The otter's burrow beside the stream is too wet, the woodpecker's hole too noisy and the rabbit burrow too crowded. As darkness falls, he ventures deeper into the forest, until he gets lost. He spies a hole between two rocks and dives in, but finds it dark and scary and scrambles back to his original cubby. It's still too small, but Benito finds that, by squirming and wiggling and then by digging, he can make it just the right size. Rossell makes Benito positively adorable while staying just this side of cloying, soft pencils defining the simplified, rounded forms of the bear. Her piney woods are suffused with a soft light; even when a skewed overhead perspective emphasizes Benito's uneasiness, they're still a comfortable place for small children to be. Readers will be especially pleased to play spot-the-squirrel as a small companion shadows Benito on his quest. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781921049866
Publisher:
Little Hare Books
Publication date:
08/01/2009
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.70(w) x 9.60(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
3 - 5 Years

Meet the Author

Janeen Brian is the author of Where Does Thursday Go? and Party Time! Judith Rossell is a professional illustrator and the author of the Explorers’ Club series, the Inspector Rockfort series, and Jack Jones and the Pirate Curse.

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