The Tooth Fairy Meets El Raton Perez

Overview

The Tooth Fairy has some competition.
 
Meet El Ratón Pérez, the charming and adventurous mouse who collects children’s teeth in Spain and Latin America.
 
When both the Tooth Fairy and El Ratón Pérez arrive to claim Miguelito’s tooth, sparks fly under the ...
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Overview

The Tooth Fairy has some competition.
 
Meet El Ratón Pérez, the charming and adventurous mouse who collects children’s teeth in Spain and Latin America.
 
When both the Tooth Fairy and El Ratón Pérez arrive to claim Miguelito’s tooth, sparks fly under the Mexican-American boy’s pillow. Who will rightfully claim his tooth?
 
This magical tale introduces a legendary Latino character to a new audience and provides a fresh take on the familiar childhood experience of losing one’s tooth.
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
When Mexican-American Miguelito loses a tooth, a twinkly Tooth Fairy and her Latin American counterpart, El Ratón Pérez (an intrepid, Spanish-speaking rat) both show up. A tug-of-war ensues: “This is Miguelito's house, and I collected his papá's, mamá's, and his abuelitos' teeth,” says the rat. But mid-squabble, the tooth goes flying, requiring them to work together to get it back. Laínez's creative story approaches the topic of cultural identity with humor and grace, while newcomer Lintern's colored pencil illustrations give it a sense of nocturnal whimsy. Ages 4-7. (May)
Publishers Weekly
When Mexican-American Miguelito loses a tooth, a twinkly Tooth Fairy and her Latin American counterpart, El Ratón Pérez (an intrepid, Spanish-speaking rat) both show up. A tug-of-war ensues: “This is Miguelito's house, and I collected his papá's, mamá's, and his abuelitos' teeth,” says the rat. But mid-squabble, the tooth goes flying, requiring them to work together to get it back. Laínez's creative story approaches the topic of cultural identity with humor and grace, while newcomer Lintern's colored pencil illustrations give it a sense of nocturnal whimsy. Ages 4–7. (May)
From the Publisher
Review, Through the Looking Glass, June 1, 2010:
"This delightful picture book combines the traditions of Latin countries with those of Anglo Saxon ones bringing together the Tooth Fairy (who is English in origin) and El Raton Perez (who first appeared in a book in Spain in 1894.) Children who are about to lose a tooth will greatly enjoy this story about cooperation and friendship."

Review, School Library Journal:
"When Miguelito hides his lost tooth under his pillow, he has no idea that he is setting off a power struggle between the English-speaking world’s Tooth Fairy and her Spanish-speaking counterpart, El Ratón Pérez.... Young readers may not consciously recognize this tale as a metaphor for growing up in two cultures, but the story does model how to successfully negotiate a bicultural life... An excellent selection for libraries serving bicultural families."

"A marvelous story merging cultures seamlessly and with great humor. Adults will enjoy this read-aloud just as much as kids." —Sandra Cisneros, award-winning author of The House on Mango Street

School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—When Miguelito hides his lost tooth under his pillow, he has no idea that he is setting off a power struggle between the English-speaking world's Tooth Fairy and her Spanish-speaking counterpart, El Ratón Pérez. The fairy says, "Here is my tooth!," and the mouse replies, "¡Aquí está, mi diente!" This clever tactic helps English-speaking children learn Spanish phrases, and vice versa. The conflict is resolved when the tooth collectors learn to work together, imparting a universal lesson about sharing and cooperation. Young readers may not consciously recognize this tale as a metaphor for growing up in two cultures, but the story does model how to successfully negotiate a bicultural life by celebrating both aspects of Miguelito's Mexican-American heritage. Lintern's pencil illustrations were edited in Photoshop to give them a sparkly, ethereal quality that perfectly suits this modern fairy tale. The back matter includes the origins of tooth-collecting creatures in the folklore of English and Hispanic cultures. An excellent selection for libraries serving bicultural families.—Mary Landrum, Lexington Public Library, KY
Kirkus Reviews
Mexican-American Miguelito loses his tooth and so begins an amusing battle between the Tooth Fairy and El Raton Perez. Colato Lainez keeps the storytelling lively with bilingual exclamations seamlessly embedded in the dialogue between the two tooth-seekers. Through a series of entertaining misadventures the tooth seems unattainable until the rivals agree to work together. Lintern infuses the pixie Tooth Fairy with glowing pastel colors while portraying the dashing El Raton Perez with contrasting earthy hues. To perhaps signify the characters' common goal and eventual collaboration, the illustrator uses the same pale pink for the fairy's wings and the mouse's ears. After El Raton Perez uses el diente to fashion a rocket ship to visit the moon, the Tooth Fairy gets the tooth to help build her sparkling castle. And not only is Miguelito rewarded with two shiny coins under his pillow, but readers are treated to a clever introduction to two charming folk customs. (author's note, glossary of Spanish terms) (Picture book. 4-7)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781582462967
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 3/23/2010
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 346,836
  • Age range: 3 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 11.50 (h) x 0.50 (d)

Meet the Author

René Colato Laõnez has authored several picture books including Playing Lotería and I Am René, the Boy. His books have won a Críticas magazine Best Book award, a Latino Book Award for Best Bilingual Picture Book, and were Tejas Star Book Award Finalists. René is a children’s literature columnist for La Bloga and received a special recognition as teacher and author by the Los Angeles Board of Education. He graduated from Vermont College with an M.F.A. in Writing for Childen and Young Adults.

Tom Lintern is a designer, illustrator, and storyboard artist living in New York City. He began drawing in pencil when he was five and still uses pencil on paper for much of his work today. The Tooth Fairy Meets El Ratón Pérez is his first picture book.

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Read an Excerpt

Miguelito wiggled and jiggled his loose tooth until one night, it fell out.
 
“Yay! Mi diente, my tooth,” he said, and put it under his pillow.
 
Soon Miguelito fell asleep.
 
 
Far away in her castle, the Tooth Fairy read fan letters, counted coins, and searched for addresses.
 
When she saw a star begin to twinkle in the sky, she rushed for her magic wand.

“Fantastic! The signal!” she said. “A new tooth!”
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