Torah and Law in Paradise Lost [NOOK Book]

Overview

It has been the fate of Milton, the most Hebraic of the great English poets, to have been interpreted in this century largely by those inhospitable to his Hebraism. To remedy this lack of balance, Jason Rosenblatt reveals Milton's epic representations of paradise and the fallen world to be the supreme coordinates of an interpretive struggle, in which Jewish beliefs that the Hebrew Bible was eternally authoritative Torah were set against the Christian view that it was a temporary law superseded by the New ...

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Torah and Law in Paradise Lost

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Overview

It has been the fate of Milton, the most Hebraic of the great English poets, to have been interpreted in this century largely by those inhospitable to his Hebraism. To remedy this lack of balance, Jason Rosenblatt reveals Milton's epic representations of paradise and the fallen world to be the supreme coordinates of an interpretive struggle, in which Jewish beliefs that the Hebrew Bible was eternally authoritative Torah were set against the Christian view that it was a temporary law superseded by the New Testament. Arguing that the Milton of the 1643-1645 prose tracts saw the Hebrew Bible from the Jewish perspective, Rosenblatt shows that these tracts are the principal doctrinal matrix of the middle books of Paradise Lost, which present the Hebrew Bible and Adam and Eve as self-sufficient entities.

Rosenblatt acknowledges that later in Paradise Lost, after the fall, a Pauline hermeneutic reduces the Hebrew Bible to a captive text and Adam and Eve to shadowy types. But Milton's shift to a radically Pauline ethos at that point does not annul the Hebraism of the earlier part of the work. If Milton resembles Paul, it is not least because his thought could attain harmonies only through dialectic. Milton's poetry derives much of its power from deep internal struggles over the value and meaning of law, grace, charity, Christian liberty, and the relationships among natural law, the Mosaic law, and the gospel.

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Editorial Reviews

Jewish Book World
In this scholarly treatise, Professor Jason Rosenblatt shows the strong relationship between the middle books of Milton's Paradise Lost and the Jewish belief of the Hebrew Bible as an eternal Torah. While it is true that after the Fall, Milton adopted a Pauline ethos, this study highlights the often neglected Hebraism of the Edenic books and his prose tracts of 1643-45.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781400821303
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/5/1994
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Course Book
  • Pages: 288
  • File size: 428 KB

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments


Abbreviations


Introduction
3
Ch. 1
Law and Gospel in Paradise Lost
12

Edenic-Mosaic Law
12

The Benign Law of Paradise
16

John Ball and John Milton on Three Aspects of the Law
27

Milton, the Reformers, and the Law
38

The Secondary Mosaic Law in the Field of This World
50

The Gospel as Heir of the Law
61
Ch. 2
Milton's Hebraic Monism
71

Milton's Chief Rabbi
82

Pharisees Selden and Milton on Divorce
97

Mosaic and Parliamentary Law in the Areopagitica
113

Toward a Monist Aesthetic
122
Ch. 3
Moses Traditions and the Miltonic Bard
138
Ch. 4
Angelic Tact: Raphael on Creation
156
Ch. 5
Book 9: The Unfortunate Redemption
164
Ch. 6
The Law in Adam's Soliloquy
204
Ch. 7
The Price of Grace: Adam, Moses, and the Jews
218

Notes
235

Index of Biblical References
267

General Index
269
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