Torc Of Moonlight by Linda Acaster, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
Torc Of Moonlight

Torc Of Moonlight

5.0 2
by Linda Acaster
     
 
Hull student Nicholas Blaketon's life has fallen into a demoralising pattern. Humiliated and angry, he becomes fixated on pale and reclusive Alice Linwood. But Alice believes that people close to her die. She seeks escape by steering her future back into the past to uncover the shrine of a forgotten Celtic water goddess. Leonard Harkin uses pseudo-pagan rites to

Overview

Hull student Nicholas Blaketon's life has fallen into a demoralising pattern. Humiliated and angry, he becomes fixated on pale and reclusive Alice Linwood. But Alice believes that people close to her die. She seeks escape by steering her future back into the past to uncover the shrine of a forgotten Celtic water goddess. Leonard Harkin uses pseudo-pagan rites to ensnare naïve young lovers, but when old lovers return with the strength of cynical womanhood, is it in joy or to close his pattern? High on the North York Moors, Romano-Briton Ognirius Licinius Vranaun has clung to a thread of life-force through millennia, sustained by a thirst for retribution as targeted as once was his vengeance on the Keepers of the Pool. But now he knows how to use the elements to his advantage, and this time he will succeed - unless Nicholas can stop Alice from revealing the shrine and completing the pattern.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781906558758
Publisher:
New Generation Publishing
Publication date:
09/21/2009
Pages:
284
Product dimensions:
0.64(w) x 6.00(h) x 9.00(d)

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Torc Of Moonlight 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Skallison More than 1 year ago
In Torc of Moonlight, Linda Acaster gives us a book which is more than simply a damn good read. This well crafted paranormal romance leads the reader through mysteries that are only gradually revealed, frightening us along the route taken by the possessed lovers. She builds empathy for the central characters, putting us inside their minds to explain their motives, drives and fears, and shredding our hearts with their emotional experiences. That she handles the male point of view with as much skill and sympathy as that of the female says a great deal about this writer's observational powers. The story concerns a rugby-playing male student and the mysterious, beautiful and surprisingly tough history student he falls for. Her preoccupation with Celtic history and, specifically, the female spirits of sacred springs in North Yorkshire, underlines her very real concern for those she loves. On a deeper level, though not intrusively, the novel deals with many themes. One that caught my imagination was the parallel of modern contact sports with ancient warrior ways. She portrays, with an understanding suggestive of her unlikely physical participation, the potential brutality of rugby. Her analogy shows how rule-breaking in sport renders the game less worthy and destroys team spirit. In the same way, her anti-hero, Ognirius, in his selfish pursuit of personal glory at the expense of his fellow countrymen, destroys trust and undermines the civilisation of his own time and that of the present day. Linda handles sex scenes and love scenes with equal veracity, lending emotional honesty to the loving relationship of the main characters and contrasting this with the usage and guile displayed by those who indulge in sex merely for their own gain. Detailed pictures of the city of Hull, its university, and the moorlands of North Yorkshire bring life to the setting of the novel without ever slowing the story. The plot moves, twists and turns to surprise, confuse and astound as it takes us through emotional, physical and spiritual conflicts to the inevitable denouement. I could not put this book down and confidently recommend it to all who love well written novels with believable characters, intriguing stories and real settings.
retriever470 More than 1 year ago
I always enjoy Linda Acaster's books. They can either be read as a straight story, or if, like me, you are that way inclined, you can delve through the layers of her writing, rather in the way that she delves through the layers of history. "Torc of Moonlight" is indeed a multi-layered book, the story of Nick and Alice on the surface, but deeper, darker things lurk beneath their relationship, things beyond their comprehension and beyond their control. The author's compelling storytelling abilities encompass that most difficult of things, descriptions of physical love that cause neither hilarity nor cringing. I loved the book. It compares to a remarkable painting in that each time you come to it, there is something new to find. It is a darkly chilling read with suspense built so adroitly by Acaster that I found myself reading the final fifty pages faster and faster. The description of Nick and Alice's visits to the Hull & East Riding Museum and the North York Moors have made me want to retrace their journey, book in hand. To stand on the Roman Road at Wheeldale Moor, to find the spring with offerings to the goddess. To see the landscape that so fired the author to write a book of such haunting passion. I felt like I had as a small child, watching Doctor Who from behind the settee. Too scared to read, but more scared not to. A gem. I recommend it to everyone.