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The Tornado: Nature's Ultimate Windstorm
     

The Tornado: Nature's Ultimate Windstorm

by Thomas P. Grazulis, T. P. Grazulis
 

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Tornadoes occur everywhere in the United States, and each region of the nation has its own tornado season. Tornadoes have crossed mountains. Some have lasted more than an hour, scouring the earth with 250 mile-per-hour winds, and some have carried automobiles a half-mile and leveled sturdy homes. In The Tornado: Nature’s Ultimate Windstorm, Thomas

Overview

Tornadoes occur everywhere in the United States, and each region of the nation has its own tornado season. Tornadoes have crossed mountains. Some have lasted more than an hour, scouring the earth with 250 mile-per-hour winds, and some have carried automobiles a half-mile and leveled sturdy homes. In The Tornado: Nature’s Ultimate Windstorm, Thomas P. Grazulis re-creates the incredible drama that so often accompanies tornadoes, and he provides detailed meteorological and statistical information about these marvels—and terrors—of nature.
 
How often does a tornado hit a particular location? How fast are its winds? Do tornadoes really seek out trailer parks? How many tornadoes hit the United States every year? How big can tornadoes get? Grazulis addresses all these questions and more in this book about one of the most destructive forces, and fascinating scientific puzzles, on the planet.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Nobody covers the history of tornadoes as well as Tom Grazulis. This book is a ‘must have’ for all meteorologists and tornado enthusiasts.”—Daniel McCarthyBulletin of the American Meteorological Society

“The foremost living expert on tornado observations . . . Grazulis enjoys a good tale but really lives for the telling statistic. . . . [Readers] will admire the author’s passion for getting the facts right.”—J.A. KnoxChoice

I strongly urge everyone living in tornado-prone areas to read this book. It might save your life!” —Keith C. HeidornCanadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society Bulletin

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
What causes tornadoes? How accurately can they be predicted? How large can they grow? The University of Oklahoma Press indulges the curiosity of those fascinated by these whirling scourges in two books. In The Tornado: Nature's Ultimate Windstorm, meteorologist Thomas P. Grazulis authoritatively conveys the science and thrill of tornadoes. His stories of "storm-chasing" and stats about "Individual Tornadoes Causing $200 Million or More in 1999 Inflation-Adjusted Damage" lend weight and immediacy to his accessible book. (Apr.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Booknews
Accounts of tornado touchdowns add human interest to this explanation of the tornado phenomenon for general readers. Tornado formation and lifecycle, forecasting, and wind speeds are addressed, as well as tornado myths and safety, tornado records, tornado risk, and tornadoes outside the US. A list of the deadliest US tornadoes is included, along with b&w photos of tornadoes and their aftermath. The author is director of the Tornado Project and fellow of the American Meteorological Society. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780806135380
Publisher:
University of Oklahoma Press
Publication date:
04/28/2003
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
346
Sales rank:
457,908
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.77(d)

Read an Excerpt

"At about 4:25 P.M. on June 9 [1953], fishermen on the north end of the Quabbin Reservoir in western Massachusetts watched as an unusual boiling and tumbling cloud took the form of an enormous, revolving cylinder. Minutes later the end of the cylinder reached down like an enormous finger and trees began to snap in the woods of Petersham. . . . For the next eightyfour minutes, that funnel would cut a damage swath of unprecedented size and intensity in the northeastern United States.

People died in the open, in cars, in lakes, and under homes in what would be called the Worcester tornado. It lifted and carried tons of debris eastward; tar paper, shingles, sheet metal, and plywood rained down onto two dozen towns in eastern Massachusetts. . . . Photographs and a piece of waterlogged, frozen mattress were found floating in the Atlantic Ocean. Trousers with a wallet were taken from the second floor of a home in Shrewsbury and dropped in Westwood, 25 miles eastsoutheast. . . . A Social Security card was returned to its owner from Hyannis on Cape Cod, 90 miles southeast of Worcester."from the Preface

Meet the Author

Thomas P. Grazulis is Director of the Tornado Project and Fellow of the American Meteorological Society.

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