Tortilla Flat

( 51 )

Overview

Adopting the structure and themes of Arthurian legend, John Steinbeck creates a "Camelot" on a shabby hillside above Monterey on the California coast and peoples it with a colorful band of knights. As he chronicles the thoughts and emotions, temptations and lusts of the "knights", Steinbeck spins a tale as compelling as the famous legends of the Round Table.
Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$10.58
BN.com price
(Save 29%)$15.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (40) from $1.99   
  • New (15) from $8.43   
  • Used (25) from $1.99   
Tortilla Flat

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$12.99
BN.com price
Marketplace
BN.com

All Available Formats & Editions

Overview

Adopting the structure and themes of Arthurian legend, John Steinbeck creates a "Camelot" on a shabby hillside above Monterey on the California coast and peoples it with a colorful band of knights. As he chronicles the thoughts and emotions, temptations and lusts of the "knights", Steinbeck spins a tale as compelling as the famous legends of the Round Table.
Read More Show Less

What People Are Saying

From the Publisher
John Steinbeck knew and understood America and Americans better than any other writer of the twentieth century. (The Dallas Morning News) A man whose work was equal to the vast social themes that drove him. (Don DeLillo)"
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780140187403
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/28/1997
  • Series: Penguin Twentieth-Century Classics Series
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 208
  • Sales rank: 603,803
  • Product dimensions: 7.70 (w) x 4.94 (h) x 0.56 (d)

Meet the Author

John Steinbeck was a novelist and dramatist whose most famous works include East of Eden, The Grapes of Wrath, and Of Mice and Men. He won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1962. José Luis Piquero is a writer and a translator whose other translations include The Great Gatsby and This Side of Paradise.

Biography

John Ernst Steinbeck, Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winner, was born in Salinas, California February 27, 1902. His father, John Steinbeck, served as Monterey County Treasurer for many years. His mother, Olive Hamilton, was a former schoolteacher who developed in him a love of literature. Young Steinbeck came to know the Salinas Valley well, working as a hired hand on nearby ranches in Monterey County. In 1919, he graduated from Salinas High School as president of his class and entered Stanford University majoring in English. Stanford did not claim his undivided attention. During this time he attended only sporadically while working at a variety jobs including on with the Big Sur highway project, and one at Spreckels Sugar Company near Salinas.

Steinbeck left Stanford permanently in 1925 to pursue a career in writing in New York City. He was unsuccessful and returned, disappointed, to California the following year. Though his first novel, Cup of Gold, was published in 1929, it attracted little literary attention. Two subsequent novels, The Pastures of Heaven and To A God Unknown, met the same fate.

After moving to the Monterey Peninsula in 1930, Steinbeck and his new wife, Carol Henning, made their home in Pacific Grove. Here, not far from famed Cannery Row, heart of the California sardine industry, Steinbeck found material he would later use for two more works, Tortilla Flat and Cannery Row.

With Tortilla Flat (1935), Steinbeck's career took a decidedly positive turn, receiving the California Commonwealth Club's Gold Medal. He felt encouraged to continue writing, relying on extensive research and personal observation of the human drama for his stories. In 1937, Of Mice and Men was published. Two years later, the novel was produced on Broadway and made into a movie. In 1940, Steinbeck won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for Grapes of Wrath, bringing to public attention the plight of dispossessed farmers.

After Steinbeck and Henning divorced in 1942, he married Gwyndolyn Conger. The couple moved to New York City and had two sons, Thomas and two years later, John. During the war years, Steinbeck served as a war correspondent for the New York Herald Tribune. Some of his dispatches reappeared in Once There Was A War. In 1945, Steinbeck published Cannery Row and continued to write prolifically, producing plays, short stories and film scripts. In 1950, he married Elaine Anderson Scott and they remained together until his death.

Steinbeck received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 "...for his realistic as well as imaginative writings, distinguished by a sympathetic humor and keen social perception.." In his acceptance speech, Steinbeck summarized what he sought to achieve through his works:

"...Literature is as old as speech. It grew out of human need for it and it has not changed except to become more needed. The skalds, the bards, the writers are not separate and exclusive. From the beginning, their functions, their duties, their responsibilities have been decreed by our species...Further more, the writer is delegated to declare and to celebrate man's proven capacity of greatness of heart and spirit—gallantry in defeat, for courage, compassion and love. In the endless war against weakness and despair, these are the bright rally flags of hope and emulation. I hold that a writer who does not passionately believe in the perfectibility of man has no dedication nor any membership in literature..."

Steinbeck remained a private person, shunning publicity and moving frequently in his search for privacy. He died on December 20, 1968 in New York City, where he and his family made a home. But his final resting place was the valley he had written about with such passion. At his request, his ashes were interred in the Garden of Memories cemetery in Salinas. He is survived by his son, Thomas.

Author biography courtesy of the National Steinbeck Center.

Read More Show Less
    1. Also Known As:
      Amnesia Glasscock
      John Ernst Steinbeck, Jr. (full name); Amnesia Glasscock
    1. Date of Birth:
      February 27, 1902
    2. Place of Birth:
      Salinas, California
    1. Date of Death:
      December 20, 1968
    2. Place of Death:
      New York, New York

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 51 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(25)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2002

    "Tortilla Flat"

    John Steinbeck creates a unique novel that describes a friendship between a group of friends. This circle of friends revolves around the main character, Danny. Danny inherits two houses and he shares them both with all of his friends. His sense of friendship and kindness to his loyal comrades helps them all to escape their toil in poverty. Friendship gives everyone the support that they deserve in a time of need; in ¿Tortilla Flat¿, John Steinbeck shows how important friendship is in a small circle of friends. Tortilla Flat is full of setting from front to back. The story is set above the town of Monterey on the California coast, in the poverty stricken district of Tortilla Flat around the early 1900¿s. Danny and his friends are unemployed drunks who live to find another dollar so they can salvage a gallon of wine from the local tavern. They share with everyone, and their loyalty to each other makes every stranger become a companion. The harsh setting of homelessness and lack of money forces the characters to unite in friendship and share their possessions with one another in order to meet their psychological needs. In the book, Danny speaks of sharing his shelter with his old friend Pilon, `Pilon, I swear, what I have is thine. While I have a house, thou hast a house. Give me a drink.¿(pg. 11) Steinbeck successfully paints a beautiful picture of the whole culture, as well as the surroundings. His incredible talent is reflected on every page of this book to keep you itching for more about this heart-warming tale of friendship.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 13, 2007

    Wonderful and Magical

    A fantastic rewriting of the story of the 'Knights of the Roundtable.' Each of the characters is well-drawn and there are many 'mini-novels' in this wonderful book. One of my favorites!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2005

    Great Steinbeck as usual

    Honestly, I don't think Steinbeck wrote a bad book. Certainly his greatest achievement is 'East of Eden' but one should not forget to check out his others such as 'Tortilla Flat.' If you like great writing, such as the works of McCullers or Jackson McCrae, then you'll love this book as well.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2004

    Enjoyeth thee !

    I really enjoyed this book. The best parts of the book were those found between the lines, like when Pilon would convince himself to keep his dollar rather than give it to Danny, as he would be doing Danny a favor that way. Or when the paisanos broke into (for them) deep conversation, they used 'thee' and 'thyne' and 'goeth thou'. Steinbeck broke into this dialect himself in the final chapters. Great subtle stuff in this book. If you want deep, don't read this book. If you want to be entertained, and spend time in a different world, read this book! Great chapters about the Corporal and Sweets. Good wine.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2014

    Enoyable

    I found this a very enjoyable book to read, funny and easy reading: The story doesn't havelots of depth, but still has good lessons about materialism and the burdens of social status- somewhat similer to Cannery Row, a somewhat better novel by Steinbeck

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2013

    &flat

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted April 26, 2013

    Book Club

    When I first read the book, I thought this is the worst piece of crap I have ever read. But once we started to discuss this in the book club I realized this is how someone who lives in a crack house today would see the world. The book is about 5 men who have no intention of ever working only how to get by.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 10, 2004

    A pointless novel lacking direction.

    This book has good writing but lacks direction. We all know that John Steinback is a good writer but this novel just didn¿t hold my appeal. There were funny parts in this book that you could laugh at and have a good time with but I didn¿t seem to understand all of it. There were also sad parts in this book that really hits home with people that have gone through some situations like this. This novel did not seem to, in the end, teach you a lesson that you could take away and use in life. This book would be a good book if he would include a lesson to use in life, so at the end of the day when you finish this book you can learn something from it.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2004

    I ENJOYED THIS NOVEL

    John Steinbeck described the real life of paisanos after WW1. Each caracter was individual. The most of all I like Danny's caracter because he was very honest and good friend. The last chapter was too touching.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2004

    A Masterpiece of American Literature

    Tortilla Flat is truly one of Steinbeck's many masterpieces -- funny, touching, and exciting all at once. The novel is about Danny, a paisano from Monterey, his friends, and all of their crazy drunken antics. The stories in Tortilla Flat are charming and hilarious. Some of the best include the tale of Teresina Cortez, who fed her nine children solely tortillas and beans, and the chapter about Sweets Ramirez and her vacuum cleaner. The main characters are lovable too. Who could forget the child-like Pirate, the ingenious Pablo, the kind Jesus Maria, or the sharp Pilon? I would definately recommend Tortilla Flat to anybody who is not offended by excess alcohol. This is a book that everybody should read!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2003

    i don't like the ending -_-;;

    Tortilla Flat was the book I chose for my book project, and although I didn't read it eagerly as I do with other books but I thought it was a good book. I love the friendship that unfolds. I just don't like the ending how Danny had to die...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 23, 2003

    Tortilla Flat, not really that great

    Tortilla Flat was an ok book. I had to read it for English class, so I just kept doggedly reading. It started off really slow, but after awhile I was able to compare the power of friendship among the friends to the world today. If you like John Steinbeck's works, you ,might want to try this one.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2003

    Great Work

    A very interesting story, that illustrates change and adjustment very well. Each character mentioned has a distinct personality and life story that is different from everyone elses. This book is very well written with its own plot and setting, but maintains Steinbeck's major theme of the life of the lower and working classes. A good book to read if you want a great story in less than 300 pages.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 7, 2002

    Big Name, Small Value

    Tortilla Flat is a readable novel by an author whose reputation far exceeds the talent he shows here. Boring, un-interesting, dry, slow, un-original are a few words I would use to desribe this novel. The sad part is that Tortilla Flat is at least half-way decent, which makes it better than some of his other, un-deservedly famous works. If you have plenty of time and not many other options then this might be worth a look; if not, steer clear.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 1, 2001

    It was good

    Tortilla Flats, by John Steinbeck was a book of reality. The novel starts out slow, but adventure increases as the novel continues on. The novel is about a group of friends who come upon sudden wealth by aquiring two houses. The adventures they go through are realistic and funny. I personoly found the novel amusing. The plot was unclear to me at until the very end of the novel. I thought the novel was about a bunch of mexican friends who get drunk all the time. Its true point was about friendship and how all friends stay together through hardships. The one friend Danny, was a sympathic soul. He helped his friends in need by giving them a house when they are homeless. Danny is such a good friend he never asked his fellow roomates for any money. The novel contained Steinbecks unique style of writting, and his use of strong imagery. I enjoyed this novel.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 51 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)