Touched by Angels

( 27 )

Overview

New York City is alwaysin need of miracles . . .

And this Christmas is no exception. Thank heavens the divinely inspired, if somewhat ditsy, angelic trio—Shirley, Goodness, and Mercy—is availableto answer three heartfelt prayers this sacred holiday season . . . and to impart important lessons along the way. And Goodness knows (as do Mercy and Shirley) that the three lonely women to whom they’ve been assigned ...

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Touched by Angels

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Overview

New York City is alwaysin need of miracles . . .

And this Christmas is no exception. Thank heavens the divinely inspired, if somewhat ditsy, angelic trio—Shirley, Goodness, and Mercy—is availableto answer three heartfelt prayers this sacred holiday season . . . and to impart important lessons along the way. And Goodness knows (as do Mercy and Shirley) that the three lonely women to whom they’ve been assigned have a lot to learn:

A dedicated inner-city school teacher,Brynn needs to teach her troubled studentshow to dream . . .

Shy and dutiful Hannah must learnto follow her own heart . . .

And frustrated small-town-girl-turned-Broadway-wannabe Jenny needs to discover thathome is where love truly lies.

It’s time for the angels to shine . . . and toprove once again that when you wish upon a star,you get much more than just a pretty song!

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061083440
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/1/1995
  • Series: Angel Series, #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 128,227
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 6.75 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Debbie Macomber

Debbie Macomber has more than 100 million copies of her books in print, and her stories about home and family have a worldwide audience and have been translated into twenty-three languages. In addition to being a #1 New York Times bestseller in fiction many times over, she also has an enormous following among knitters as the author of dozens of pattern and craft books. In 2008, she launched a branded line of knitting products through Leisure Arts, the company that publishes her knitting guides. Debbie and her husband, Wayne, have four children and nine grandchildren, and split their time between Washington State and Florida. This is Debbie’s second picture book co-authored with Mary Lou Carney; their first, The Truly Terribly Horrible Sweaer . . . That Grandma Knit, was published in 2009.

Biography

Publishing did not come easy to self-described "creative speller" Debbie Macomber. When Macomber decided to follow her dreams of becoming a bestselling novelist, she had a lot of obstacles in her path. For starters, Macomber is dyslexic. On top of this, she had only a high school degree, four young children at home, and absolutely no connections in the publishing world. If there's one thing you can say about Debbie Macomber, however, it is that she does not give up. She rented a typewriter and started writing, determined to break into the world of romance fiction.

The years went on and the rejection letters piled up. Her family was living on a shoestring budget, and Debbie was beginning to think that her dreams of being a novelist might never be fulfilled. She began writing for magazines to earn some extra money, and she eventually saved up enough to attend a romance writer's conference with three hundred other aspiring novelists. The organizers of the conference picked ten manuscripts to review in a group critique session. Debbie was thrilled to learn that her manuscript would be one of the novels discussed.

Her excitement quickly faded when an editor from Harlequin tore her manuscript to pieces in front of the crowded room, evoking peals of laughter from the assembled writers. Afterwards, Macomber approached the editor and asked her what she could do to improve her novel. "Throw it away," the editor suggested.

Many writers would have given up right then and there, but not Macomber. The deeply religious Macomber took a lesson from Job and gathered strength from adversity. She returned home and mailed one last manuscript to Silhouette, a publisher of romance novels. "It cost $10 to mail it off," Macomber told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in 2000. "My husband was out of work at this time, in Alaska, trying to find a job. The children and I were living on his $250-a-week unemployment, and I can't tell you what $10 was to us at that time."

It turned out to be the best $10 Macomber ever spent. In 1984, Silhouette published her novel, Heartsong. (Incidentally, although Heartsong was Macomber's first sale, she actually published another book, Starlight, before Heartsong went to print.) Heartsong went on to become the first romance novel to ever be reviewed in Publishers Weekly, and Macomber was finally on her way.

Today, Macomber is one of the most widely read authors in America. A regular on the New York Times bestseller charts, she is best known for her Cedar Cove novels, a heartwarming story sequence set in a small town in Washington state, and for her Knitting Books series, featuring a group of women who patronize a Seattle yarn store. In addition, her backlist of early romances, including several contemporary Westerns, has been reissued with great success.

Macomber has made a successful transition from conventional romance to the somewhat more flexible genre known as "women's fiction." "I was at a point in my life where I found it difficult to identify with a 25-year-old heroine," Macomber said in an interview with ContemporaryRomanceWriters.com. "I found that I wanted to write more about the friendships women share with each other." To judge from her avid, ever-increasing fan base, Debbie's readers heartily approve.

Good To Know

Some outtakes from our interview with Macomber:

"I'm dyslexic, although they didn't have a word for it when I was in grade school. The teachers said I had 'word blindness.' I've always been a creative speller and never achieved good grades in school. I graduated from high school but didn't have the opportunity to attend college, so I did what young women my age did at the time -- I married. I was a teenager, and Wayne and I (now married nearly 37 years) had four children in five years."

"I'm a yarnaholic. That means I have more yarn stashed away than any one person could possibly use in three or four lifetimes. There's something inspiring about yarn that makes me feel I could never have enough. Often I'll go into my yarn room (yes, room!) and just hold skeins of yarn and dream about projects. It's a comforting thing to do."

"My office walls are covered with autographs of famous writers -- it's what my children call my ‘dead author wall.' I have signatures from Mark Twain, Earnest Hemingway, Jack London, Harriett Beecher Stowe, Pearl Buck, Charles Dickens, Rudyard Kipling, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, to name a few."

"I'm morning person, and rip into the day with a half-mile swim (FYI: a half mile is a whole lot farther in the water than it is on land) at the local pool before I head into the office, arriving before eight. It takes me until nine or ten to read through all of the guest book entries from my web site and the mail before I go upstairs to the turret where I do my writing. Yes, I write in a turret -- is that romantic, or what? I started blogging last September and really enjoy sharing bits and pieces of my life with my readers. Once I'm home for the day, I cook dinner, trying out new recipes. Along with cooking, I also enjoy eating, especially when the meal is accompanied by a glass of good wine. Wayne and I take particular pleasure in sampling eastern Washington State wines (since we were both born and raised in that part of the state).

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    1. Hometown:
      Port Orchard, Washington
    1. Date of Birth:
      October 22, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Yakima, Washington
    1. Education:
      Graduated from high school in 1966; attended community college
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

The young man wore a staple in one ear. Brynn Cassidy tried not to stare as he paraded past her and slouched down in the desk in the farthest corner of the classroom. His nose was decorated with a safety pin. The fact that his hair was cut in a Mohawk style and dyed orange shouldn't faze her. She'd been told what to expect.

Manhattan High School wasn't St. Mary Academy, the parochial girls' high school where she'd taught for the last two years. But teaching here was an opportunity she couldn't let pass her by. She'd accepted this position to test her theories and gain experience in dealing with students from a disadvantaged neighborhood.

Next, a young lady entered the room in a miniskirt, blouse and no bra. Her hair, pitch-black and stringy, covered her far better than her choice of outfits. She glanced around, shrugged, and claimed the seat closest to the door as if it were important to make a fast getaway.

The room filled quickly. The school building itself was said to be dilapidated and run-down, but that didn't trouble Brynn. St. Mary Academy was a turn-of-the-century structure with high ceilings and lovely polished wood floors that smelled of lemon oil.

When Brynn learned Manhattan High in the Washington Heights area had been constructed in the early 1950s, she'd expected it to be an improvement, but she was wrong. Like so many other schools, Manhattan High had been forced to make some difficult budget choices. Thanks to three failed school bond levies, modernizing the classrooms was on the low end of the priority list.

"Will everyone kindly take a seat," Brynn instructed nervously. She stood in front of the classand was ignored, which wasn't surprising since the bell had yet to ring.

Looking for something constructive to do, she walked over to the badly chipped blackboard and wrote out her name.

The bell rang, and several of the kids stopped talking long enough to indicate their irritation at being interrupted. The level of conversation increased once the bell finished.

Brynn returned to the front center of the room and waited. She'd learned early in her teaching career never to outshout her students. It only made her look foolish, and it didn't work. After five full minutes of being ignored, she went to the wall and flipped the light switch a couple of times. This technique had worked elsewhere but had only a mild effect upon the class. The level of talking decreased momentarily while several glanced her way, then quickly continued their ongoing conversations.

Brynn decided she had no option but to wait them out. It demanded the longest fifteen minutes of her life to stand in front of that classroom until thirty people voluntarily gave her their attention.

It might have taken longer if the boy, Hispanic from the look of him, hadn't raised his right hand and snapped his fingers. Ten or so other Hispanics stopped talking and turned around on their seats. An African American followed suit, and several of the others clustered together went silent.

The class had divided itself along ethnic lines, Brynn noted. The Hispanics sat in the front, the African Americans chose the back.

Once silence reigned, Brynn stepped forward. "Good morning," she said with her brightest smile. "My name's Miss Cassidy-

'Why ain't you married?"

"Because I'm not," she answered simply, preferring not to get trapped in a conversation about herself "I'm your teacher, and —""You're new, ain't you?"

"Yes," Brynn answered politely. "As you already know, we're involved in an experimental program called Interdisciplinary Learning."

"That doesn't sound like something a nice girl like you should be teaching," one of the boys called out.

Despite herself, Brynn smiled. "We'll be spending three hours together each afternoon, exploring senior English, world history, and social science. You'll notice how the classes are grouped along parallel lines."

"is she speaking English?" one girl whispered loudly, leaning toward another.

Brynn decided it would be best to explain the concept in simpler terms. "The classes we'll be studying are connected by subject. We'll read The Diary of Anne Frank for the English portion, the history section will involve the study of World War Two, and in the last part of the session I'd like to discuss the justification for war and other value clarification."

"All three hours will be spent with you?"

"That's right," Brynn said. "You'll know me better than any other teacher, and by the same token, I'll know you. I'd like it if we could work together as a team."

"If we're going to be spending this much time with one teacher, then it only seems right that you tell us something about yourself first," the Hispanic boy who'd quieted the class said. Since she owed him a favor, she agreed.

"What do you want to know?"

"How long you been teaching?"

"This is my third year,"

"If she lasts the first week," someone suggested under their breath.

"I'll last," Brynn assured them. "I'm too young to retire and too stubborn to quit."

"Where'd you come from?"

"Rhode Island."

"Why'd you decide to teach here?"

"She's a fool, that's why," someone answered for her.

"That's not true," Brynn countered. "As I explained earlier, we're involved in an experimental program that's being sponsored by the federal government. I was asked to participate."

"Why'd you do it?"

The questions were making her decidedly uncomfortable. "Part of the agreement would be that a portion of my student loan would be forgiven."

"Forgiven?"

"That's the word the government used."

"Where'd you teach before?" a Chinese girl asked, her gaze shyly meeting Brynn's.

"St. Mary Academy. It's a private school for girls near Rochester."

" La de da," one of the boys said in a high-pitched voice...

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 27 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 27 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 10, 2002

    Wonderful Uplifting Holiday Book!

    For those that may or may not believe in angels, this is one for the Holidays that will help you to believe. An awesome book. Debbie has outdone herself again. You'll laugh and cry and believe in angels before you finish this book.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2013

    Angelic read

    Read the angel series out of order but it was a great story in itself. Found myself reading in the early morning hours instead of sleeping. Great book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2013

    Love love

    Debbie Macomber love all of your books Thank You

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 10, 2012

    Amy to jonathon

    Go too angel result one

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 13, 2012

    Great book Love the Debbie Macomber books

    Everything that Debbie Macomber writes is good. This one was a gift as I had already read it. It came in plenty of time for mt friends birthday.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2011

    Quick, fun read

    Enjoyed is book during the Christmas Season.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2013

    Dhend

    I suc

    0 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2012

    Love Debbie's angel series

    Another wonderful story by Dennis Macomber!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 30, 2012

    Excellent

    Love Debbie Macomber books!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 19, 2012

    Great continuation of beloved characters

    Love the characters.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 11, 2012

    Katie

    A few weeks ago

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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