BN.com Gift Guide

Towards a Flexible Labour Market: Labour Legislation and Regulation since the 1990s

Overview

Taking as its starting point the authors' earlier work on Labour Legislation and Public Policy, this book provides a detailed account and critical analysis of British labor legislation and labor market regulation since the early 1990s. Referring back to the earlier history, and filling in the gaps in the early and mid-1990s, the work concentrates mainly on the legislation and policy measures in the employment sphere of the New Labour governments which have been in power since 1997, placing those developments in ...

See more details below
Paperback
$59.75
BN.com price
(Save 14%)$70.00 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (11) from $9.02   
  • New (6) from $33.50   
  • Used (5) from $9.02   
Sending request ...

Overview

Taking as its starting point the authors' earlier work on Labour Legislation and Public Policy, this book provides a detailed account and critical analysis of British labor legislation and labor market regulation since the early 1990s. Referring back to the earlier history, and filling in the gaps in the early and mid-1990s, the work concentrates mainly on the legislation and policy measures in the employment sphere of the New Labour governments which have been in power since 1997, placing those developments in the context of the relevant aspects of European Community law.

The work argues for an understanding of this body of legislation and regulatory activity as being directed towards the realization of a flexible labor market, and shows how this objective has been pursued in three intersecting areas, those of regulating personal or individual employment relations, regulating collective representation, and promoting work. It explores the methods of regulation which have been used, developing a taxonomy of regulation and a notion of 'light regulation' to characterize some recent legislative interventions. It considers how far the administration of Prime Minister Tony Blair has fulfilled its promises or claims of 'fairness at work,' 'welfare to work,' and 'success at work,' and is of interest to academics studying British and European labor or employment law, employee relations or human resource management, labor market economics, and contemporary politics.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780199217885
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • Publication date: 5/10/2007
  • Series: Oxford Monographs on Labour Law Series
  • Pages: 290
  • Product dimensions: 9.10 (w) x 6.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Paul Davies is Cassel Professor of Commercial Law in the London School of Economics Mark Freedland is Professor of Employment Law in the University of Oxford

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents


Table of Cases     xiii
Table of Legislation     xv
Abbreviations     xxiii
Introduction     1
From collective laissez-faire to labour market regulation     1
The labour policy of New Labour     5
The scope of the book     12
Personal Work Relations and Managerial Adaptability     15
The law and management of personal work relations-context and policy     15
Regulation of personal work relations under the Major administration 1990-97     24
Basic labour standards and general worker protection     27
Recognition of human and equality rights in personal work relations     32
Modifying legislation to non-standard employment     34
The positive construction of managerial adaptability and public service reform     35
The first phase of the Blair administration, 1997-2001     42
Basic labour standards and general worker protection     46
Recognition of human and equality rights in personal work relations     53
Modifying legislation to non-standard employment     55
The positive construction of managerial adaptability and public service reform     58
The second phase of the Blair administration, from 2001 onwards     60
Basic labour standardsand general worker protection     63
'Family-friendly' measures     63
Tribunal reform and dispute resolution     64
Flexible working     67
Working time     70
Pensions     71
Gangmasters: and criminal liability for health and safety     78
Recognition of human and equality rights in personal work relations     81
Modifying legislation to non-standard employment     87
The positive construction of managerial adaptabilit and public service reform     91
TUPE, Wilson and Palmer, and the Employment Relations Act 2004     91
Public service reform     94
Teachers and firefighters     97
The 'Agenda for Change' in the NHS     98
The 'two-tier workforce', the 'Warwick Accord', and the TUPE Regulations     101
Collective Labour Law     105
The policy context in 1997     105
Industrial conflict law: continuity with some change     110
Continuity     110
Change: the position of individual workers     112
Change: industrial action ballots     114
Freedom of association and the recognition of trade unions     114
Freedom of association     114
Trade union recognition      118
Underlying principle     119
Detailed design     121
The impact of the procedure and further reform     126
Mandatory consultation of employee representatives     130
Background     130
Union policy: mandatory consultation as a route to collective bargaining     132
EU policy on employee involvement     134
Background     134
Participation and the European Company     135
Works councils and similar bodies in continental Europe     137
From subject-specific consultation to European Works Councils     139
National consultation arrangements     144
Assessment     145
Mandatory consultation and British labour law     146
Subject-specific consultation     146
Transposition of the EWC and SE Directives     148
The framework Directive and the ICE Regulations     150
Assessment     156
Conclusions: partnership?     159
Promoting Work     163
'Welfare to Work'     163
Labour market conditionality     170
Availability for work     170
Actively seeking work     171
Jobseeker's agreements      172
New Deals     173
Jobseekers     173
The disabled and long-term sick     175
Lone parents     178
Older workers     180
Conclusion     181
Making work pay     182
The National Minimum Wage (NMW)     182
The NMW and Wages Councils     182
Setting the NMW     185
Impact and enforcement     187
Conclusion     188
Tax credits     190
Incentives to work and the relief of poverty     190
Development of policy to 2002     192
Development of policy, 2002 and after     194
Operation in practice     196
Conclusion     197
Reducing barriers to work     198
Disability discrimination     199
Age discrimination     203
'Family friendly' policies     209
Training     211
Migrant workers     216
International setting and conclusions     223
Conclusion-A New Way Found?     229
The contingent path to labour market regulation     229
'Welfare to Work'     233
The role of the social partners     236
Individual employment relations, managerial flexibility, and labour market regulation     240
A critical task for employment law     247
Index     251
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)