Towards a New Architecture

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Overview

For the Swiss-born architect and city planner Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, 1887-1965), architecture constituted a noble art, an exalted calling in which the architect combined plastic invention, intellectual speculation, and higher mathematics to go beyond mere utilitarian needs, beyond "style," to achieve a pure creation of the spirit which established "emotional relationships by means of raw materials." The first major exposition of his ideas appeared in Vers une Architecture (1923), a compilation ...
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Towards a New Architecture

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Overview

For the Swiss-born architect and city planner Le Corbusier (Charles-Edouard Jeanneret, 1887-1965), architecture constituted a noble art, an exalted calling in which the architect combined plastic invention, intellectual speculation, and higher mathematics to go beyond mere utilitarian needs, beyond "style," to achieve a pure creation of the spirit which established "emotional relationships by means of raw materials." The first major exposition of his ideas appeared in Vers une Architecture (1923), a compilation of articles originally written by Le Corbusier for his own avantgarde magazine, L'Esprit Nouveau. The present volume is an unabridged English translation of the 13th French edition of that historic manifesto, in which Le Corbusier expounded his technical and aesthetic theories, views on industry, economics, relation of form to function, the "mass-production spirit," and much else. A principal prophet of the "modern" movement in architecture, and a near-legendary figure of the "International School," he designed some of the twentieth century's most memorable buildings: Chapel at Ronchamp; Swiss dormitory at the Cite Universitaire, Paris; Unite d'Habitation, Marseilles; and many more.

Le Corbusier brought great passion and intelligence to these essays, which present his ideas in a concise, pithy style, studded with epigrammatic, often provocative, observations: "American engineers overwhelm with their calculations our expiring architecture." "Architecture is stifled by custom. It is the only profession in which progress is not considered necessary." "... a cathedral is not very beautiful ..." and "Rome is the damnation of the half-educated. To send architectural students to Rome is to cripple them for life." Profusely illustrated with over 200 line drawings and photographs of his own works and other structures he considered important, Towards a New Architecture is indispensable reading for architects, city planners, and cultural historians-but will intrigue anyone fascinated by the wide-ranging ideas, unvarnished opinions and innovative theories of one of this century's master builders.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781614276050
  • Publisher: Martino Fine Books
  • Publication date: 4/1/2014
  • Pages: 312
  • Sales rank: 497,158
  • Product dimensions: 6.14 (w) x 9.21 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction V
Argument 1
The Engineer's Aesthetic and Architecture 9
Three Reminders to Architects
I Mass 21
II Surface 33
III Plan 43
Regulating Lines 65
Eyes Which Do Not See
I Liners 85
II Airplanes 105
III Automobiles 129
Architecture
I The Lesson of Rome 149
II The Illusion of Plans 175
III Pure Creation of the Mind 199
Mass-Production Houses 225
Architecture of Revolution 267
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2000

    How better to learn about Corbusier than from Corbusier

    I had seen some of Corbusier's work and always thought it to be cold and undesirable because of his use of concrete as one of his main building materials. After reading his book, I began to see not only why he used concrete but also began to see his idea of how space should function. Towards A New Architecture explains Corbusier's idea of 'houses as machines for living in.' He gives three examples of modern inventions that are very efficient and inhabitable, ocean liners, airplanes, and cars, and explains how a building should meet the needs of it's inhabitants the way these examples do. Towards A New Architecture helped me appreciate architecture from a new viewpoint.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

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