Tower of Babble: How the United Nations Has Fueled Global Chaos

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Overview

In this follow-up to his bestselling expose about Saudi Arabia's support of global terrorism, Dore Gold, a former ambassador to the United Nations, reveals how the United States faces a dangerous world filled with terrorists and troubling regimes because the United Nations has created a global crisis with its moral relativism. Asserting that the United Nations has failed in its mission to preserve peace, that anti-American and anti-democratic forces have hijacked the UN, Gold argues that United Nations, founded ...

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Tower of Babble: How the United Nations Has Fueled Global Chaos

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Overview

In this follow-up to his bestselling expose about Saudi Arabia's support of global terrorism, Dore Gold, a former ambassador to the United Nations, reveals how the United States faces a dangerous world filled with terrorists and troubling regimes because the United Nations has created a global crisis with its moral relativism. Asserting that the United Nations has failed in its mission to preserve peace, that anti-American and anti-democratic forces have hijacked the UN, Gold argues that United Nations, founded in 1945 to hold individual nations accountable to a community with common democratic values, has abandoned the guidelines for acceptable conduct and punishment of its violators. Gold carefully documents this devolution, starting with the Cuban Missile crisis to the 2003 war against Iraq and beyond.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Bound to be one of the most controversial critiques in the public debate on the UN.” —Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State

“An exceptionally valuable and timely book . . . Shocking . . . Gold brings us face to face with the reality that, even with the passing of the Soviet Union, the UN’s moral failings have not much diminished.” —Commentary

“Most conservatives, of course, realize by now that abolishing, or withdrawing from, the United Nations is never going to happen. Instead, they’re seeking to bring it to heel. The strategy is outlined by former Israeli ambassador to the UN Dore Gold in his book Tower of Babble.” —Los Angeles Times

“Dore Gold’s excellent book Tower of Babble documents the UN’s shortcomings.” —New York Sun

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781415917336
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/29/2008
  • Format: MP3
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Ships to U.S.and APO/FPO addresses only.

Meet the Author

Dore Gold, author of the New York Times bestseller Hatred’s Kingdom, served as Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations from 1997 through 1999 and has been a diplomatic envoy to numerous international leaders. Ambassador Gold, who earned his Ph.D. in international relations and Middle East studies from Columbia University, lives in Jerusalem, where he runs the Jerusalem Center for Public Affairs.
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Read an Excerpt

CHAPTER 1

The Erosion of Standards

The United Nations was really an American idea. Indeed, as one former U.S. ambassador to the UN put it in the 1970s, "At first the UN was seen as the instrument of American ideologues."1 The UN's founders established the organization to promote American values and principles on a global scale.

Created in the aftermath of the Allied victory in World War II, the world body had actually been conceived well before the defeat of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in 1945. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt had shown his enthusiasm for an international organization as early as the 1930s. The United States had never joined the League of Nations, which had been created after the First World War, but Roosevelt became the first president to send American observers to Geneva to sit in on League sessions. Roosevelt was not naïve, however. He saw the League's flaws. The organization failed to counter the rise of the Axis powers in the 1930s, the invasions of Ethiopia, Manchuria, and the Rhineland, and ultimately the outbreak of the Second World War. Thus, when Roosevelt and British prime minister Winston Churchill drew up the Atlantic Charter in August 1941-even before the United States had entered the war-they called for "a wider and permanent system of general security." It was in fact FDR who first used the term "United Nations." On January 1, 1942, less than a month after Pearl Harbor, the countries allied against the Axis powers signed the "Declaration by United Nations," a title that Roosevelt proposed. Churchill had preferred the name "Allied Nations."2

Months later, according to the notes of his trusted aide Harry Hopkins, President Roosevelt explained to British foreign secretary Anthony Eden that the new international body he envisioned "should be world-wide in scope . . . but, finally, that the real decisions should be made by the United States, Great Britain, Russia, and China, who would be the powers for many years to come that would have to police the world."3

At 1944's Dumbarton Oaks Conference outside of Washington, FDR reiterated his conception of the new international body. Specifically he described an organization that would enforce peace through the world's "four policemen": the United States, Great Britain, China, and the USSR.4 If an aggressor "started to run amok and seeks to grab territory or invade its neighbors," FDR explained to reporters at the time of Dumbarton Oaks, the UN would "stop them before they got started."5 This was precisely the model the great powers drew up for the UN at the conference. As such, the UN was designed first and foremost to avoid the failures that had plagued the League of Nations. FDR was a realist, a point he drove home in an October 1944 campaign address in New York City in which, when he spoke about the UN, he reminded his listeners, "We are not fighting for, and we shall not attain a utopia."6 For Roosevelt, the engagement of the United States and the other great powers was vital to give teeth to the organization's international security measures.

Franklin Roosevelt died on April 12, 1945, but the plan for the UN survived. In fact, within two weeks of Roosevelt's death, the UN's founding conference would convene in San Francisco, where the UN Charter would ultimately be drafted and signed. The four policemen, along with France, became the permanent members of the UN Security Council, which would eventually include ten additional rotating members. It would be responsible for safeguarding international peace and security. Yet the UN...

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Table of Contents

Introduction : the roots of chaos 1
Ch. 1 The erosion of standards 25
Ch. 2 Failure foreshadowed : the first tests for the UN in Israel and India 45
Ch. 3 The cold war freeze : from Korea to Cuba 71
Ch. 4 Igniting war, undermining peace : the Six-Day War and the struggle over Resolution 242 91
Ch. 5 The return of the UN? : the 1991 Gulf War victory and the lead-up to another war 111
Ch. 6 Impartial to genocide : the UN in Rwanda 135
Ch. 7 "Scenes from hell" : the UN and the Srebrenica massacre 155
Ch. 8 Institutionalized moral equivalence : the International Criminal Court 175
Ch. 9 The UN backs terrorism 197
Conclusion : from moral equivalence to world order 221
App The paper trail 239
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2005

    Another Outstanding Effort from Mr. Gold

    Another sobering and richly documented work that should be required reading for every American. Mr. Gold provides frightening evidence of the U.N. as an enabler of tyrants, terrorism, genocide, corruption and anti-Semitism. Mr. Gold outlines how the U.N. has metamorphsized from a institution of noble intent to an organization that is far beyond dysfunctional. The U.N. and its leadership, embracing a philosophy of moral relativism, have done a stunning disservice to mankind. Mr. Gore provides the proof.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2004

    Shocking Eye Opener

    Devastating. I¿m very pleased -- and outraged -- at the same time. Very pleased at having found such a terrific read on something so important to America¿s relationship to the world. Outraged because I would have liked to think better of the UN, and the shocking evidence uncovered here makes that impossible. After reading the thrilling pages of Gold¿s expose, the evidence is undeniable: the UN was not only defective from the start, but it has directly aggravated all of the conflicts that have come before it, and even through its willful inaction, spread violence and lawlessness. I can no longer look at the genial image of Secretary-General Kofi Annan, or his top aides, without thinking of the thousands of victims of the Rwanda genocide that they abandoned, or the hostages in Sebrenica taking misguided refuge in UN ¿safe havens,¿ awaiting slaughter. Or the scandalous coverups and corruption recently uncovered in post-war Iraq. Aside from these inexcusable betrayals of its mandate, the UN ¿ as shown in ¿Tower of Babble¿ ¿ was defective in a much deeper sense. Gold traces the UN¿s destructive role in the word, including its hopelessly politicized institutions, to a fatal flaw: a moral blindness to the distinction between aggressor and victim, between threat and threatened. The case against the UN, and for an alternative coalition-based diplomacy, is resoundingly made. The moving narrative and evocative photographs will forever haunt my image of this once prized organization. No followers of current events can afford to miss this brilliant expose.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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