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Toxic Mold Litigation, Second Edition / Edition 2

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781933264370
  • Publisher: Lawyers & Judges Publishing
  • Publication date: 10/28/2009
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 403
  • Sales rank: 978,304
  • Product dimensions: 5.80 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Joel L. Herz of the Law Offices of Joel L. Herz in Tucson, Arizona, concentrates in complex environmental and related litigation matters. He graduated from the University of Michigan with honors in 1985, and the University of Michigan Law School in 1987. From 1987 to 1994, Mr. Herz practiced in the environmental and litigation practice groups with the New York office of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver and Jacobsen. Over the past 22 years, he has handled more than 100 mold and other environmental proceedings or litigations for clients, including NL Industries, 3M, and Fruit of the Loom. His litigation practice includes cases under Superfund, environmental insurance, and various state environmental laws, as well as toxic tort and mold actions. He has achieved substantial victories for private clients in environmental cases, such as In re FV Steel and Wire Co, 372 B.R. 446 (Bankr. E.D. Wis. 2007) and Halliburton v. NL Industries, Inc.,553 F. Supp 2d (S.D. Texas 2008) affirmed per curium. He also counsels and assists clients concerning environmental compliance and how to limit environmental risks in transactions. He was the original co-editor of Toxic Mold Litigation (Lawyers & Judges Publishing, 2005). Joel L. Herz is AV rated by Martindale-Hubbell.

Ernest L. Greer is Managing Shareholder of Greenberg Traurig, LLP's Atlanta office and Chair of the Atlanta Litigation Practice Group. His practice consists of the representation of clients in various complex litigation matters, including class action, construction, commercial, products liability, and employment litigation. He serves as construction counsel for numerous corporations and government entities and has wide-ranging trialexperience representing construction industry clients in multi-million dollar actions. He is admitted to practice in Georgia. Mr. Greer was listed by Chambers & Partners USA Guide
Richard J. Valladares is a Shareholder in the Litigation Practice Group of Greenberg Traurig, LLP's Atlanta office. He has experience in numerous areas of litigation, including construction, products liability, insurance coverage, complex commercial, class action, and personal injury defense. Mr. Valladares' litigation and trial experience extends throughout all phases of a dispute, including pre-litigation negotiations, administrative investigations, trial, and appeal. In addition, he advises a wide array of clients, from Fortune 500 companies to the smallest entrepreneur, on dispute resolution and litigation avoidance techniques. He is admitted to practice in Georgia and New Jersey.

Ryan C. Grelecki is an associate in the Commercial Litigation group of Greenberg Traurig, LLP's Atlanta office. His practice focuses on a variety of complex commercial and business-related litigation, including construction litigation. Ryan has had a variety of experiences in all aspects of the litigation and dispute resolution processes, including the taking of fact and expert witness depositions, drafting and arguing various substantive motions and hands-on experience in trial, mediation and arbitration. Ryan received his J.D. from the Florida State University College of Law, where he served as Notes & Comments Editor and Writing & Research Editor for the Florida State University Law Review. He also served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Robert L. Hinkle, Chief Judge of the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida. Ryan received undergraduate degrees in Marketing and Religion from The College of William & Mary.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1. Mold
Barry L. Bellovin, Esq.
1.1 Legal Aspects of Mold Litigation Overview
1.2 Legal Theories
1.3 Insurance Issues
1.4 Statute of Limitations

Chapter 2. Evidentiary Standards in Toxic Mold Litigation
Dennis I. Wilenchik, Esq. and Adam S. Polson, Esq.
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Expert Witness Evidentiary Standards
A. The Frye "General Acceptance" Test
1. The Frye procedure
2. The trial court's discretion under Frye
B. The Daubert Test
1. Subsequent case law interpreting Daubert
2. The Daubert procedure
C. States Applying a Hybrid System or Their Own Evidentiary
Standards
D. Rule 703 of the Federal Rules of Evidence
2.3 Evidentiary Standards for Mold-Related Injuries and Diseases
A. Manual of Scientific Evidence
B. Allergic Reactions Resulting From Exposure to Mold
C. Infection Resulting From Exposure to Mold
D. Injury and Disease Resulting from Exposure to Toxic Mold
1. Infant lung hemorrhage
2. Cancer
3. Brain damage and other cognitive deficiencies
4. Fibromyalgia
5. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity
6. Sick Building Syndrome
7. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
8. Reactive Airway Dysfunction Syndrome
2.4 Causation
A. General Causation
B. Specific Causation
1. Case law illustrating causation principles
2.5 Preparing Data for Trial
2.6 Conclusion
Endnotes

Chapter 3. Sampling and Analysis for Mold Contamination in the Indoor Environment
Linda D. Stetzenbach, Mark P. Buttner, and Sean P. Abbott
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Planning for the Monitoring of an Indoor Environment
3.3 Methods for Sampling and Analysis
A.Analysis
1. Culture analysis
2. Microscopic analysis
3. Additional analytical methods
4. Molecular biology
5. Limitations to current analysis methods
B. Air Sampling
1. Impactor samplers for culture-based analysis
2. Impactor samplers for microscopic-based analysis
3. Filter sampling
4. Gravity/settle plate sampling
5. Limitations to air sampling
C. Source/Surface Sampling
1. Culture-based surface sampling
2. Microscopy-based surface sampling
D. Interpretation of Data
References

Chapter 4. The Current Science of Mold
Ryan C. Kuhn, Ph.D. and Mindy Olivares, M.S.
4.1 Introduction to Mold
4.2 Conducting a Mold Investigation
4.3 Air Sampling
4.4 Surface Sampling
4.5 Data Interpretation Consideration
A. Laboratory Selection
B. Measuring Units
C. Background Debris
D. Standardized Interpretation of Data
E. Determining Human Exposure to Mold
4.6 Current Guidance Documents

Part II

Chapter 5. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Arizona
Dennis I. Wilenchik, Esq.
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Possible Explanations for Arizona's Mold Problems
A. The Pace of Construction in Arizona
B. Building Materials Used in Arizona
C. Arizona's Warm Temperatures
D. Homeowners' Contribution to the Mold Problem
5.3 Typical Claims Asserted by Plaintiffs in Arizona
A. Introduction
B. Negligence
C. Implied Warranty of Habitability
D. Breach of Contract or Breach of Express Warranty
E. Landlord/Tenant Issues
F. Other Potential Causes of Action and Homeowner Complaints
G. Damages
5.4 Recent Construction Legislation in Arizona
A. HB 2620 (2002), SB 1311 (2004), and SB 1374 (2006): Purchaser
Dwelling Action; Opportunity to Repair
B. A.R.S. n 12-2602
5.5 Reported Mold Case Law in Arizona
5.6 Admissibility of Expert Witness Testimony in Arizona
5.7 Conclusion
Endnotes

Chapter 6. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in California
Eric S. Fisher, Esq. and Ryan C. Grelecki, Esq.
6.1 Introduction
6.2 California Mold Legislation
6.3 Potential Causes Of Action
A. Negligence
B. Breach of Fiduciary Duty
C. Strict Liability
D. Breach of Warranty
E. Constructive Eviction
F. Violation of Business and Professions Code Section 17200
6.4 Damages
A. Personal Injury Claims
B. Property Damage Claims
6.5 Statutes Of Limitations
6.6 Admissibility Of Scientific Evidence Or Expert Testimony
6.7 Insurance Coverage Issues
Endnotes

Chapter 7. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Delaware
Douglas F. Schleicher, Esq. and Julie Beddingfield, Esq.
7.1 Introduction
7.2 State and Local Enforcement Authority
A. Delaware State Housing Authority
B. Local Cities and Municipalities
7.3 Private Rights of Action
A. Contractual Claims for Economic Loss
1. Implied warranty of habitability (residential)
2. Warranty of habitability (commercial leases)
3. Implied warranty of construction in a skillful and workmanlike
manner
B. Torts
1. Negligence (premises liability)
2. Professional negligence
3. Strict products liability
4. Negligent misrepresentation (professional)
5. Implied warranty of fitness for intended purpose
(professionals)
6. Negligent workmanship/construction
7. Fraudulent misrepresentation (sale of property)
8. Negligent misrepresentation (sale of property)
9. Innocent misrepresentation (sale of property)
Endnotes

Chapter 8. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Florida
David B. Weinstein, Esq. and Kimberly S. Mello, Esq.
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Personal Injury Claims
8.3 Workers' Compensation Claims
8.4 Class Actions
A. Class Certification Denied
B. Class Certification Granted
8.5 Property Damage and Building Defect Claims
8.6 Florida's Construction Defect Law
A. Application
B. Procedure
1. Service of the notice of claim
2. Procedure following receipt of the notice of claim
3. Effect on litigation
8.7 Insurance Coverage
8.8 Florida Mold Legislation
A. Application
B. Licensing, Fees, and Additional Requirements
C. Prohibitions and Penalties
8.9 Conclusion

Chapter 9. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Georgia
Ernest L. Greer, Richard J. Valladares, and Ryan C. Grelecki
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Potential Causes of Action
A. Tort Claims
1. Sellers of real estate
2. Real estate agents or brokers
3. Architects, designers or general contractors
B. Breach of Contract
C. Breach of Implied Warranties
1. Implied warranty of good workmanship
2. Implied warranty of habitability
9.3 Class Actions
9.4 Potential Defenses
A. Statute of Limitations
B. Statute of Repose
C. Spoliation
D. Right to Repair
9.5 Damages and the Economic Loss Doctrine
9.6 Admissibility of Scientific Evidence or Expert Testimony
9.7 Georgia Mold Legislation
9.8 Insurance Coverage
A. First-Party Property Coverage
B. Third-Party Liability Coverage
C. Absolute Pollution Exclusion
D. Bad Faith Claims
Endnotes

Chapter 10. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Illinois
Edward Eshoo, Jr., Esq.
10.1 Introduction
10.2 First-Party Property Insurance Coverage
10.3 Residential Real Property Disclosure Act
10.4 Personal Injury and Property Damage Claims
A. Standard for Admissibility of Experts
B. Statutes of Limitations and Repose
10.5 Third-Party Liability Insurance
10.6 Mold Legislation
Endnotes

Chapter 11. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Indiana
Abigail A. Clapp, Esq. and Matthew Levinstein
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Potential Causes of Action
A. Negligence
1. Sellers of real estate
2. Builders
B. Breach of Contract
C. Breach of Implied Warranties
1. Implied warranty of good workmanship
2. Implied warranty of habitability
3. Implied warranty of quiet enjoyment
D. Fraud
E. Workers' Compensation
11.3 Class Actions
11.4 Potential Defenses
A. Statute of Repose
B. Spoliation of Evidence
C. Contractual Provisions
11.5 Damages
A. Attorneys' Fees and Costs
B. Cost of Repair versus Diminution of Value
C. Opportunity to Repair
D. Application of the Economic Loss Doctrine
11.6 Admissibility of Expert Testimony
11.7 Indiana Mold Legislation
11.8 Insurance Coverage
A. Absolute Pollution Exclusion Provisions
B. Mold-Specific Exclusion Provisions
11.9 Conclusion
Endnotes

Chapter 12. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Massachusetts
David M. Governo, Esq., Marianne E. Brown, Esq., and
Sarah E. O'Leary, Esq.
12.1 Introduction
12.2 Massachusetts Common Law Theories
A. Negligence
1. Claims of negligence
2. March 2009 plaintiffs' verdict: Herman v. Sullivan
3. Negligence per se
B. Breach of Contract
C. Breach of Express Warranty
D. Breach of Implied Warranty
1. Warranty of fitness
2. Warranty of habitability
E. Nuisance and Negligent Maintenance
12.3 Massachusetts Statutory Claims
A. Landlord-Tenant Laws
1. Quiet enjoyment
2. Warranty of habitability
3. Reprisal statutes
B. Massachusetts Consumer Protection Law
12.4 Procedural Considerations
A. Statutes of Limitation
1. Negligence
2. Breach of contract
3. Breach of express warranty
4. Breach of implied warranty
5. Consumer bad faith statute
B. Claims Against The Government
C. Statute of Repose
12.5 Insurance Considerations
A. Policy Coverage
B. Claims Litigation
1. Homeowner's insurance
2. General liability policies
3. Disability insurance
Endnotes

Chapter 13. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in New Jersey
Patrick J. Perrone, Esq., Richard J. Valladares, Esq. and Ashley Turner
13.1 Introduction
13.2 Potential Causes of Action
A. Negligence
1. Professional sellers of real estate
2. Builders
3. Subcontractor liability
B. Breach of Contract
C. Breach of Implied Warranties
1. Implied warranty of good workmanship
2. Implied warranty of habitability
3. Implied warranty of quiet enjoyment
D. Fraud or Negligent Misrepresentation Claims
E. Workers' Compensation
13.3 Class Actions
13.4 Potential Defenses
A. Statute of Repose
B. Spoliation
C. Contractual Provisions
13.5 Damages
A. Attorneys' Fees and Costs
B. Cost of Repair versus Diminution of Value
C. Opportunity to Repair
D. Economic Loss Doctrine
13.6 Admissibility of Scientific Evidence or Expert Testimony
13.7 New Jersey Mold Legislation
13.8 Insurance Coverage
A. Absolute Pollution Exclusion
B. Mold-Specific Exclusions
1. Personal lines and commercial lines property
2. Personal lines liability
13.9 Conclusion
Endnotes

Chapter 14. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in New York
Richard J. Valladares, Esq. and Ryan C. Grelecki, Esq.
14.1 Introduction
14.2 Tort Actions
A. Negligence
B. Misrepresentation
C. New York Consumer Protection Statute
D. Medical Monitoring Claims
14.2 Contract Actions
14.3 Potential Defenses to Mold Claims
A. Defenses to Personal Injury Claims
1. Statute of limitations
2. Causation
B. Defenses to Property Damage Claims
14.4 Insurance
14.5 Conclusion
Endnotes

Chapter 15. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Oregon
Kelly Vance, Esq.
15.1 Introduction
15.2 Insurance Issues Affecting Oregon Mold Claims
15.3 Standard of Proof for Experts in Oregon
15.4 Negligence, Breach of Contract and the Economic Loss Rule
15.5 Oregon Toxic Mold Decisions
A. Strader v. Grange Mutual Insurance Company
B. O'Hara v. David Blain Construction, Inc.
C. Haynes v. Adair Homes, Inc.
1. Economic loss doctrine
2. Challenges to plaintiff's medical expert
3. Attorney fees
Endnotes

Chapter 16. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Pennsylvania
Douglas F. Schleicher, Esq. and Julie Beddingfield, Esq.
16.1 Introduction
16.2 State and Local Enforcement Authority
A. Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection
B. Local Regulations
16.3 Potential Private Rights of Action
A. Contract Claims
1. Contractual claims for economic loss
2. Implied warranty of habitability (residential)
3. Implied warranty of habitability (commercial)
4. Implied warranty of construction in a good and workmanlike
manner
5. Breach of lease
B. Pennsylvania Unfair Trade Practices and Consumer Protection
Law
C. Residential Real Estate Disclosure Law
D. Tort Actions
1. Negligence (premises liability)
2. Professional negligence
3. Intentional infliction of emotional distress
4. Strict products liability
5. Medical monitoring damages
6. Negligent misrepresentation (professional)
7. Implied warranty of fitness for intended purpose
(professionals)
8. Negligent construction
9. Intentional misrepresentation/failure to disclose (sale of
property)
10. Negligent misrepresentation (sale of property)
11. Innocent misrepresentation (sale of property)
16.4 Insurance Coverage
Endnotes

Chapter 17. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in South Carolina
Eric Fosmire, Esq.
17.1 Introduction
17.2 Right to Cure Residential Construction Defects
17.3 Statutes of Limitations and Repose
17.4 Insurance Issues
A. Trigger of Coverage
B. Duty to Defend
17.5 Joint and Several Liability
17.6 Theories of Liability in Mold Actions
17.7 Class Actions
17.8 Experts
17.9 South Carolina Toxic Mold Case Law
Endnotes

Chapter 18. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Texas
Stephen Pate, Esq. and Rhonda M. Sigman, Esq.
18.1 Introduction
18.2 Mold Litigation in Texas
A. The Statute of Limitation and Accrual of Action Issues
B. Difficulties in Maintaining Personal Injury Claims
1. General requirements
2. Expert testimony
C. Insurance Litigation
1. Statutory claims under the Texas Insurance Code Chapters 541
and 542 (Formerly Articles 21.21 and 21.55)
2. Trigger of insurance coverage
3. "Ensuing loss" provisions
D. Texas Mold Legislation
Endnotes

Chapter 19. An Overview of Toxic Mold Litigation in Washington
Kelly Vance, Esq.
19.1 Introduction
19.2 Construction Negligence Claims in Washington
19.3 Washington Standards for Admissibility of Expert Evidence
19.4 Reported Mold Cases
19.5 Insurance Issues
Endnotes

Chapter 20. Overview of Toxic Mold Case Law in Other States
Richard J. Valladares, Esq., Ander Krupa, Esq., and Ryan C. Grelecki, Esq.

Internet Resources

About the Editors

About the Contributors

Index
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