Track that Scat!

Overview

When Finn and her dog Skeeter set out on a hike to cure their restless feet, they literally take a step into nature. A big gooey step...right into scat (also known as poop). And just like the animal it comes from, scat comes in all shapes and sizes. Scat, along with foot or paw tracks, can tell a lot about the creature who produced it. As Finn's hike takes her further into the woods, she happens along some scat and tracks from a variety of woodland creatures. Pairing punchy rhyme with science writing, Lisa ...
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Overview

When Finn and her dog Skeeter set out on a hike to cure their restless feet, they literally take a step into nature. A big gooey step...right into scat (also known as poop). And just like the animal it comes from, scat comes in all shapes and sizes. Scat, along with foot or paw tracks, can tell a lot about the creature who produced it. As Finn's hike takes her further into the woods, she happens along some scat and tracks from a variety of woodland creatures. Pairing punchy rhyme with science writing, Lisa Morlock has created the perfect nature guide, providing detailed descriptions of the prints, diets, and behaviors of the animals that Finn and Skeeter encounter along their hike. Watch your step!
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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Stepping in animal poop is rarely cause for celebration, but it is for a girl named Finn in a story that invokes not one, not two, but three meanings of the word “scat.” On a wildlife walk with her basset hound, Finn introduces her brand-new sneakers to a potpourri of animal scat: “Three-toed web prints grouped together./ Nearby floats a long tail feather./ With one trop-plop, Finn’s foot goes splat./ Oh no! She steps into... goose scat!” Morlock describes each animal’s habits and excrement in (extremely) detailed paragraphs: “Rabbits eat their own poop. When the scat comes out the first time, it’s in soft, moist pellets.” In addition to Bradshaw’s more fancifully painted spreads, the animals’ tracks and scat are depicted as they might appear in an animal identification guide. Nature-minded readers who are more careful than Finn about watching where they step will find plenty of information about what animals leave on the forest floor. Ages 4–8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
Animals that leave tracks may also leave scat, also known as their fecal droppings, along the way. A girl named Finn and her dog, Skeeter, go exploring and find a variety of both. On the trail, Finn first steps on rabbit scat, goose scat, and raccoon scat. Rhyming verse tells of the happenings, and flamboyant illustrations add to the dramatic effect. Paragraphs in smaller print provide facts about each animal, and sketches define the shape of the tracks and scat. Each page shows Finn stepping into scat, and turning to the next page reveals the animal. She finds tracks and scat of a red fox and a skunk. Then scat falls from a chickadee onto her boots. At bedtime, her mom finds the stinky boots. The facts about each animal includes how it moves and leaves tracks, a description of its diet and scat, and the behaviors and sounds it makes, such as the raccoon that chatters, snarls, and growls when it is upset. The large and amusing illustrations of each animal along with Finn and her adorable dog highlight all the happenings. The rhyming verses are fun, and the factual information is interesting, although those facts might need to be read by an adult because of the more advanced vocabulary and small print. The unusual subject matter becomes educational in this clever handling of the habits of these woodland creatures. Reviewer: Vicki Foote
School Library Journal
K-Gr 2—If the need arises to teach children how to identify wild animal scat, start with this picture book. A simple story in rhyme introduces Finn and her dog, Skeeter, as they track wild creatures through the woods surrounding their house. "Finn slows below a chickadee/that's singing in a maple tree./The bird takes flight. Finn feels a splat./New boots are blotched by songbird scat." Invariably, she steps in the scat each creature has left behind. Three paragraphs about each animal, among them a Canada goose and raccoon, offer facts, including a description of its sounds and the shape of its tracks and scat. The large spreads are inviting, and the dog, a basset hound, is cute, cute, cute, and the gross factor is likely to draw kids in.—Stephanie Farnlacher, Trace Crossings Elementary School, Hoover, AL
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585365364
  • Publisher: Sleeping Bear Press
  • Publication date: 2/1/2012
  • Pages: 32
  • Sales rank: 405,426
  • Age range: 6 - 10 Years
  • Product dimensions: 10.10 (w) x 10.10 (h) x 0.30 (d)

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