×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tracking Tyrannosaurs: Meet T. rex's fascinating family, from tiny terrors to feathered giants
     

Tracking Tyrannosaurs: Meet T. rex's fascinating family, from tiny terrors to feathered giants

by Christopher Sloan, Xing Lida (Illustrator), Liu Yi (Illustrator)
 

See All Formats & Editions

This book highlights a newly discovered T. rex relative in China with a coat of downy feathers! This one-ton predator is the largest known animal to ever have walked the Earth. This discovery was made public in April 2012, and is a timely addition that sets this book apart from other dinosaur titles. 

We meet 19 kinds of tyrannosaurs—including seven new

Overview

This book highlights a newly discovered T. rex relative in China with a coat of downy feathers! This one-ton predator is the largest known animal to ever have walked the Earth. This discovery was made public in April 2012, and is a timely addition that sets this book apart from other dinosaur titles. 

We meet 19 kinds of tyrannosaurs—including seven new species discovered in the last two years—that came before T. rex. The names are strange, like Bistahieversor and Zhuchengtyrannus. The creatures were strange, too, and many of the newly discovered ones caught scientists by surprise. 

Filled with engaging, lifelike illustrations by Xing Lida, Tracking Tyrannosaurs explains to kids how T. rex, the most famous, ferocious dinosaur of all-time was only one of many tyrannosaurs that lived on Earth for over 100 million years!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Selected as a 2014 Outstanding Science Trade Book for Students K-12 by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and the Children’s Book Council
Children's Literature - Vicki Foote
Fascinating facts about tyrannosaurs are featured in this nonfiction historical overview that also covers recent discoveries. Bold and detailed illustrations add drama to details about the first find, as well as accounts of the kinds of dinosaur bones that have been found in the last ten years. A tyrannosaur is defined in the first chapter, and representations of a dinosaur family tree and a tyrannosaur family tree presented. The second chapter highlights each of the various types, from the Guanlong to the Allioramus. A “Dino Database” about each dinosaur relates the pronunciation of its name, its meaning, where it was found, and when it lived. There is a large map that indicates the sites where dinosaur remains have been excavated. The third chapter discusses how new tools and finds are continually enabling scientists to add to their knowledge about the behavior of the species. Sidebars called “Tyranno Facts” add information such as the fact that tyrannosaurs replaced each tooth about every two years. “Tyrannosaur Trackers” throughout the text primarily feature individual paleontologists. Photographs show such things as fossil bones in the ground, a scientist working in a laboratory, and tyrannosaur teeth. The text is part of the “National Geographic Kids” series. A table of contents, a glossary, an index, and a list of other resources are included. The exciting action-filled illustrations will appeal to readers, and all of the information makes this text an outstanding resource for libraries and schools. Reviewer: Vicki Foote AGERANGE: Ages 9 to 12.
School Library Journal
12/01/2013
Gr 5–7—Having a rock star like T. rex in one's family tree pretty much ensures that other tyrannosaurids will find themselves languishing in the wings like amp-toting roadies, but Sloan's new genealogical work certainly pops the spotlight on some nifty critters. The readable text investigates the evolutionary path of this predatory family, providing both a general "Dinosaur Family Tree" as well as a more specific "Tyrannosaur Family Tree"—from the Jurassic through the Cretaceous—to that final line in the rock above which no dino fossils have been found. From that point, Sloan delves into particular "branches." A global location map (including continental-drift insets) is provided, and some nine species are given facing-page units. These are graced with information boxes, size comparisons, a "Dino Database," and, more importantly, a clear presentation of what is known about that dinosaur, including its discovery and physical attributes, and what its existence means on the evolutionary tree. Included are such "new" finds as agile little Guanlong and the 30-foot-long Yutyrannus, surprisingly covered in "long, thick, hairlike feathers." All this is accompanied by some eye-catching, realistic artwork—informative in its own right. Slim, readable, informative, and with a feathery, toothy Yutyrannus clomping through a snowy landscape on the cover, this title will spend a good part of its life out in circulation.—Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781426313752
Publisher:
National Geographic Society
Publication date:
09/24/2013
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 10.90(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Formerly a Senior Editor and Director of Mission Projects for National Geographic magazine, CHRISTOPHER SLOAN specializes in ancient civilizations, early humans, and prehistoric life. He has written seven children's books, which have appeared on numerous best book lists, including School Library Journal Best Books of the Year, Booklist Editors' Choice, Garden State Children's Book Award, Outstanding Science Trade Books for Students K-12 (NSTA/CBC), and the Children's Literature Choice List.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews