×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Tracy Lawrence
     

Tracy Lawrence

5.0 1
by Tracy Lawrence
 
An appreciation of family, simple pleasures, and old-fashioned love permeates Tracy Lawrence's telling self-titled new album. Sounding like a man revitalized, Lawrence, who's hit a few rough patches in his time, luxuriates in these archetypal, mainstream country feel-good songs, even the ones that detail his own missteps. The forthright ballad "Getting Back Up" drives

Overview

An appreciation of family, simple pleasures, and old-fashioned love permeates Tracy Lawrence's telling self-titled new album. Sounding like a man revitalized, Lawrence, who's hit a few rough patches in his time, luxuriates in these archetypal, mainstream country feel-good songs, even the ones that detail his own missteps. The forthright ballad "Getting Back Up" drives home the key lyric -- "But as bad as it's been/I'm not givin' in" -- with finger-picked guitars, booming drums, and a mournful pedal steel in support of Lawrence's intense vocal. The folksy, shuffling "That Was Us" recounts the juvenile hijinks of an earlier, rambunctious time, the twist being that the wild boys Lawrence describes snap to in a crisis and come to the aid of a farmer too sick to bring in his crop. Boasting an infectious rhythm and bright, singsong melody, the album-closing "I Won All the Battles" finds a bemused Lawrence reflecting on the folly of satisfying his need to be right by winning petty arguments with the woman he loved, only to lose her in the end. The buoyancy of his vocal -- and the utter lack of self-pity -- bespeaks a satisfied mind. Lesson learned, the hard way. Move on.

Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Liana Jonas
There's a reason why Tracy Lawrence is on his ninth studio release, and a listen to the honky-tonk good album opener "Crawlin' Again" off his self-titled release reminds listeners why. Here, Lawrence's simple and lighthearted approach to addressing heartache is a refreshing and sorely needed touch in contemporary music -- country and otherwise. Look at these lyrics: "It takes a mama 20 years to make a boy a man/and another woman 20 seconds to have him crawlin' again." "Lawrence" wrote two sentences to describe what musicians fill four-minutes worth of song to express. Then there's the twangy and laid-back title track, where Lawrence, with no trickery or Shakespearean prose, expresses one of people's most fundamental desires: to live well, fully and simply. "Sit down in the porch swing/sip a little ice tea/play with the kids in the yard/it's time to get lazy/had enough crazy/life ain't gotta be so hard." You can't top that. Lawrence's ability to plainly and vividly portray life's moments is sheer artistry. This is best evidenced on "What a Memory," an ode to a mother-son relationship that could make a steer cry. Musically speaking, this set is noticeably more scaled down -- simple guitar lines, 4/4 rhythms, and vocals -- compared to Lawrence's past efforts. His minimalist musical style is in winning tandem with his delightfully direct and honest approach to songwriting. Together, you couldn't ask for more abundant fare. Tracy Lawrence is simply a great, real piece of work. It restores faith in jaded audiences who believe music has degenerated into one huge bucket of cookie-cutter swill. Less is so much more sometimes, and if artists can pull this off successfully, as Lawrence does here, God bless them.

Product Details

Release Date:
10/23/2001
Label:
Warner Bros Mod Afw
UPC:
0093624818724
catalogNumber:
48187
Rank:
22699

Related Subjects

Tracks

Album Credits

Performance Credits

Tracy Lawrence   Primary Artist
Alison Brown   Banjo
Eric Darken   Percussion
Sonny Garrish   Steel Guitar,pedabro
Owen Hale   Drums
B. James Lowry   Acoustic Guitar
Gary Lunn   Bass
Liana Manis   Background Vocals
Brent Rowan   Banjo,Electric Guitar
Aubrey Haynie   Mandolin
Wes Hightower   Background Vocals
Gary W. Smith   Keyboards

Technical Credits

Tracy Lawrence   Producer
Butch Carr   Engineer
Flip Anderson   Producer
Maude Gilman   Art Direction
Lori Turk   Groomer
Marla Cannon-Goodman   Composer

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews

Tracy Lawrence 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Tracy Lawrence, credited with hits such as ''Alibis,'' ''If the World Had a Front Porch,'' ''Time Marches On,'' and ''Lessons Learned,'' is back in full force with an album that is sure to touch the heart of any true country music fan. In this self-titled album, the Arkansas native stated that he wanted to ''explore his country roots and to get back to the basics of country music,''and has succeeded in doing so. The album opens with the delightfully fun ''Crawlin' Again'' which describes the primal need men have for a woman's love. Next, he leads into a chain of ear-catching melodies including his current single ''Life Don't Have to be so Hard,'' the sweet ''Meant to Be,'' the foot-tapping ''She Loved the Devil Out of me'', and the lyrically clever ''GOD's Green Earth.'' Tracy's ''All Over It'' will remind listeners of Alan Jackson's hit ''Right on the Money,'' while ''It's Hard to Be an Outlaw'' and ''Whole Lotta Lettin' Go'' describes Tracy's attempt to overcome his past ghosts. Two songs that really stand out and scream for attention are ''Getting Back Up'' and ''What a Memory.'' Both songs have a heart-wrenching effect and are the epitome of the soul of country music. ''Getting Back Up'' describes the heartache and trials of a man's struggles to regain his footing after a relationship gone sour. ''What a Memory'' narrates a touching story of a dying mother's love for her only son. These two ballads will no doubt take Tracy to the top of the charts. I for one found this album a refreshing return to the elements that made country music such a dominant force in the music industry. It skillfully avoids the pop-country blend that Nashville seems to be adopting. Tracy filtered through the dirt and sand that country music has evolved into and has found a golden nugget with this album. Not only is it inspiring for the soul but is even better for the ears.